GRB 990510 Sky Region

The object of study is the remnant of a mysterious cosmic explosion far out in space, first detected as a gigantic outburst of gamma rays on May 10. Gamma-Ray Bursters (GRBs) are brief flashes of very energetic radiation — they represent by far the most powerful type of explosion known in the Universe and their afterglow in optical light can be 10 million times brighter than the brightest supernovae. The May 10 event ranks among the brightest one hundred of the over 2500 GRB''s detected in the last decade. To the left is a reproduction of a short (30 sec) centering exposure in the V-band (green-yellow light), obtained with VLT ANTU and the multi-mode FORS1 instrument on May 11, 1999, at 03:48 UT under mediocre observing conditions (image quality 1.0 arcsec).The optical image of the afterglow of GRB 990510 is easily seen in the box, by comparison with an exposure of the same sky field before the explosion, made with the ESO Schmidt Telescope in 1986 (right).The exposure time was 120 min on IIIa-F emulsion behind a R(ed) filter. The field shown measures about 6.2 x 6.2 arcmin 2. North is up and East is left.

Credit:

ESO

About the Image

Id:eso9926c
Type:Observation
Release date:18 May 1999
Related releases:eso9926
Size:2732 x 1332 px

About the Object

Name:GRB 990510
Type:• Early Universe : Cosmology : Phenomenon : Gamma Ray Burst
• X - Stars
Distance:z=1.619 (redshift)

Image Formats

Large JPEG
1.6 MB
Screensize JPEG
222.5 KB

Wallpapers

1024x768
361.4 KB
1280x1024
605.6 KB
1600x1200
886.1 KB
1920x1200
1.0 MB
2048x1536
1.3 MB

Colours & filters

BandTelescope
Optical
V
Very Large Telescope
FORS1
Optical
R
ESO 1-metre Schmidt telescope

Notes: Right image obtained by the 1-metre Schmidt telescope, the left was taken using the VLT.

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