Seminars and Colloquia at ESO Garching and on the campus

September 2019

16/09/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Galaxy formation with feedback from individual massive stars
Thorsten Naab (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Data-driven Astronomy, Machine Learning versus Deep Learning
Nima Sedaghat (ESO)

Abstract

In the first half of the talk we will go over a brief introduction to deep learning together covering the history, differences with machine learning and its recent advances. Then we will review the general use cases, starting with typical ones like classification, regression and finishing with auto-encoders.

In the second half, we will detail two exemplar data-driven applications in astronomy: a) TransiNet: real-time transient detection using ConvNets, b) "Letting spectra speak for themselves!

11/09/19 (Wednesday)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — The Physical and Chemical Evolution of Starless and Prestellar Cores
Yancy Shirley (Univ. of Arizona)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — ASPECS: The ALMA Spectroscopic Survey of the UDF
Gergö Popping (ESO)

Abstract

Thanks to ALMA our understanding of gas and dust in galaxies over cosmic time and their connection to other galaxy properties has improved dramatically. I will discuss a number of the results from the ALMA large program ASPECS, a spectroscopic survey at 1 and 3 millimeter with ALMA of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. This survey marks the deepest observations of a 4.2 arcmin^2 contiguous area on the sky and pushes our understanding of gas and dust in high-redshift galaxies even further. The aims of this survey include measuring the cosmic evolution of the molecular gas density and the gas properties of galaxies; the deepest measurement of the 1 millimeter continuum number counts and it’s connection to the underlying galaxy population; improving our understanding of dust obscuration at high redshift; and constraining the [CII] luminosity (function) of high-redshift galaxies. I will present the main survey design and after that focus on some of the individual results of the survey, guided by the interest of the audience.

10/09/19 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — UVIT study of hot stars in old star clusters of our galaxy
Ram Sagar (Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore)

Abstract

It is well known that old stellar populations are dominated by evolved short-lived hot stars (Teff  > 10, 000 K). Such stars emit most of the light in the Ultra-Violet (UV) and have similar optical colours over a wide range of temperatures because the optical passbands are far enough down the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of their spectral-energy distributions. They are therefore inconspicuous in optical images of old star clusters in comparison to the large numbers of main-sequence stars and red giants. But, far-ultraviolet (FUV) and near-ultraviolet (NUV) imaging of old stellar populations provide a unique opportunity for the studies of white dwarfs, blue stragglers stars (BSSs), post asymptotic giant branch star and compact binaries etc. Since they are easily discerned in the rarefied topography of Far UV/Near UV colour magnitude diagrams. Consequently, a number of space missions including Hubble Space Telescope have imaged a number of globular and a few old open star clusters since they are not only ideal objects but also span a broad range of stellar populations in both age and chemistry, as well as a variety of environments.

In light of the above, a key science project on this topic has been identified by the ASTROSAT, India’s first multi-wavelength (X-ray to optical) space-born astronomy mission launched successfully on 28 September 2015.  Life time of the mission is 5 years. Five scientific payloads are mounted on the ASTROSAT. One of them is UV Imaging Telescope (UVIT).  It has spatial resolution of ~1.2 arc-sec, large field of view (~ 28 arc-min diameter) and also has number of filters in both FUV and NUV regions.  UVIT observations, therefore, provide very useful observations for extracting the properties of UV bright stellar populations in a star cluster. A few results published recently will be highlighted in this talk along with future Indian Space mission in UV as well as encouraging capabilities of recently installed Indo-Belgian 3.6 meter optical telescope located in central Himalayan region of India.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — The Planes of Satellite Galaxies Problem of LCDM
Marcel Pawlowski (AIP)
09/09/19 (Monday)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — The Quantum Einstein's Equations of Loop Quantum Gravity
Kristina Giesel (FAU Erlangen-Nuernberg)
04/09/19 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — P/2016 G1: an impact in the main belt, in slow motion
Olivier Hainaut (ESO)

Abstract

P/2016 G1 is an "active asteroid", i.e. a main belt asteroid that suddenly displayed a cloud of dust. We observed its evolution for a few month, and could re-constitute the details of what happened to it using a few millions of test particles, a little detective work, and hydrodynamics simulations of nuclear weapon explosions.

03/09/19 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — ALMA as a new survey telescope to study the cosmic baryon cycle
Anne Klitsch (ESO)

Abstract

The cosmic baryon cycle is key to our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. Open questions are: How do baryons cycle into and out of galaxies? What physical processes drive the dramatic change in the cosmic star formation rate history? What galaxies harbor half of the star formation activity in the universe enshrouded in dust? I show how we transform ALMA into a survey telescope acquiring more than 2000h of observing time. I present measurements of the molecular gas across cosmic time offering new clues on the evolution of the star formation rate history. Furthermore, I highlight new results from our search for the dusty star-forming galaxies.

August 2019

14/08/19 (Wednesday)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
ORIGINS Cluster Lecture
Talk — Binary Neutron Star Mergers
Zi-gao Dai (Nanjing University)
13/08/19 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Stellar Forensics with the most powerful explosions in the Universe
Maryam Modjaz (NYU)

Abstract

Supernovae (SNe) and Long-duration Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are exploding stars and constitute the most powerful explosions in the universe. Since they are visible over large cosmological distances, release elements heavier than Helium, and leave behind extreme remnants such as black holes, they are fascinating objects, as well as crucial tools for many areas of astrophysics, including cosmology. However, for many years the fundamental question of which stellar systems give rise to which kinds of explosions has remained outstanding, for both Type Ia SNe used for cosmology as well as for Superluminous SNe and long-duration GRBs that must originate from special kinds of massive stars. I will discuss the exciting recent progress that we have made on this question in key areas by publishing and thoroughly analyzing the largest data sets in the world at the time. I will conclude with an outlook on how the most promising venues of research - using the existing and upcoming innovative large time-domain surveys such as ZTF and LSST - will shed new light on the diverse deaths of stars.

07/08/19 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy
Henri Boffin (ESO)

Abstract

I will provide for those that couldn’t attend a succinct and very biased account on the ESO workshop on Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy that took place July 22-26 and attracted more than 130 participants.

06/08/19 (Tuesday)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — UV gas distributions and photochemistry in protoplanetary disks
Nicole Arulanantham (University of Colorado)

Abstract

As the two most abundant molecules in protoplanetary disks around young stars, H2 and CO are critical tracers of the planet formation environment. We have used the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST-COS) to observe emission from electronic transitions of both molecules at ultraviolet wavelengths. The UV spectral features were fit with a 2-D radiative transfer model to reproduce the radial distributions of gas in the inner disks around a sample of T Tauri stars. By combining kinematic information from UV-H2 and UV-CO for the first time, we provide a more complete census of molecular structure in the planet forming regions of our sample of young disks. In addition, the UV radiation field is critical in regulating photochemical reactions within the disk. We have used the HST-COS spectra to reproduce the LyA profile and FUV continuum reaching the gas. We compare our results to emission from CN (observed with ALMA) and HCN (observed with Spitzer-IRS), which are chemically dependent on UV photons.

05/08/19 (Monday)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Seminar
Talk — Formation and Dissolution of Star Clusters: A Simple, Unified Picture
Michael Fall (STSCI, Baltimore) (STScI, Baltimore)

July 2019

31/07/19 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Relict filaments of stars discovered by GAIA
Giacomo Beccari and Tereza Jerabkova (ESO)

Abstract

Observations in the infrared and sub-mm using the Herschel and ALMA suggest that stars form in high mass density filaments in giant molecular clouds while embedded star clusters and high mass stars reside at the intersection of filaments, hubs and ridges. What imprint does the star formation in filaments leave in young stellar populations just emerging from their natal molecular clouds? In this informal discussion we show that GAIA-DR2 data allow us to answer this question.

30/07/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Designing the optimal fusion experiment
Sophia Henneberg (IPP Greifswald)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — A stellar halo surrounding Omega Cen
Annalisa Calamida (STScI)

Abstract

I will present results from a catalog of ~1.8 million Omega Cen member stars derived from DECam photometry covering a field of view of ~5x5 degrees  across the cluster and HST data for the innermost regions. The unprecedented accuracy of DECam photometry, the depth and field coverage, combined with HST data for the cluster core, allowed me for the first time to derive the global stellar density profile of Omega Cen based on star counts of red-giant and main-sequence stars from 1 to ~140 arcminutes.

The King and Wilson models fail to reproduce the outermost shape of Omega Cen density profile suggesting that the interaction with the Galactic tidal field and the presence of potential escaper (extra-tidal) stars need to be taken into account to explain the observations. The best fit of Omega Cen density profile is found with the SPES models which include potential escaper stars, confirming the presence of a stellar halo around the cluster. 

29/07/19 (Monday)
14:15, Room 313, MPP, Foehringer Ring 6, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Theory Seminar
Talk — Hepp bound for Feynman integrals
Erik Panzer (Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford)
14:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — The diffuse soft X-ray background and the nature of the Galactic halo: the promise of eROSITA and (maybe) XQCSat from mapping and spectroscopy
Dan McCammon (Univ. of Wisconsin)
26/07/19 (Friday)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — An Up-close view of turbulent, clumpy galaxies
Deanne Fisher (Swinburne Univ. of Technology)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — An ALMA+ACA measurement of the shock in the Bullet Cluster
Luca Di Mascolo (MPA)
25/07/19 (Thursday)
16:15, LMU room A348, Theresienstr. 37, Munich | ESO Garching
Arnold Sommerfeld Lectures
Talk — What is Dark Matter?
Hitoshi Murayama (UC and LBL Berkeley)
14:00, TUM Physik, Garching | ESO Garching
Theoretical High Energy Physics Seminar
Talk — An EFT approach to black hole perturbations
Enrico Trincherini (SNS Pisa)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
SESTAS
Talk — Multigrid methods for solving Einstein field equations and general-relativistic hydrodynamics simulations
Patrick Cheong (Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong)
24/07/19 (Wednesday)
16:15, LMU room A348, Theresienstr. 37, Munich | ESO Garching
Arnold Sommerfeld Lectures
Talk — When a Symmetry Breaks
Hitoshi Murayama (UC and LBL Berkeley)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — An Up-close view of turbulent, clumpy galaxies
Deanne Fisher (Swinburne Univ. of Technology)
23/07/19 (Tuesday)
17:15, LMU room B052, Theresienstr. 39, Munich | ESO Garching
Arnold Sommerfeld Lectures
Talk — Quantum Universe
Hitoshi Murayama (UC and LBL Berkeley)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — A powerful multi-scale and multi-phase wind in a local AGN
Mattia Sirressi (Stockholm University (from September 2019))

Abstract

I will present the results of my master thesis project on quasar feedback and outflows, which have been submitted for publication to MNRAS and announced at https://arxiv.org/abs/1906.00985.

The Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) play a major role in the evolution of the galaxies, thanks to their ability to launch powerful outflows. The detection of nuclear X-ray winds, as well as ionised and molecular galactic outflows provide direct evidence of the so called feedback processes in action, whose physics is nevertheless poorly understood. 

I have studied a local AGN hosting a powerful nuclear X-ray wind, using ALMA observations in order to trace, at galactic scales, the molecular ISM kinematics. I found the signature of a possible molecular outflow with v~200 km/s that is potentially able to suppress the star-formation activity. By comparing the energetics of this putative outflow with that of the nuclear wind, I tested the blast-wave AGN feedback scenario favouring a momentum-driven outflow over an energy-driven model. 

I will introduce the scientific background, present the data analysis and discuss the possible interpretations of the results and their implications.

11:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Compressive Sensing in Cosmology: reconstruction of 1D signals
Diego Barbosa (Los Andes University)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Modelling the radiative transfer of Lyman alpha emission in large cosmological volumes
Siddhartha Gurung-Lopez (CEFCA)
22/07/19 (Monday)
17:15, LMU, H030, via Amalienstr. 54, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Topological Photonics
Alex Szameit (University of Rostock)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Star formation and feedback in the brightest lensed starburst galaxies at z ~ 2–4
Raoul Canameras (MPA)
19/07/19 (Friday)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Role of buoyancy, turbulence and cooling in the intracluster medium
Rajsekhar Mohapatra (ANU)
18/07/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — The mystery of multiple populations in globular clusters
Carmela Lardo (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)
Download video |

Abstract

The discovery that stars in globular clusters do not fit within the traditional picture of hosting stars with the same age and chemical composition has led to a renewed interest in globular cluster studies. Indeed, it has been discovered that these complex systems host stars with variations in many elements like helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sodium (a.k.a. multiple populations). Several scenarios have been put forward to explain the origin of the observed variations, but none of them is able to entirely reproduce observations. After more than 30 years from the discovery of multiple populations, their origin is still a mystery. In this talk, I provide an outline of observations of multiple populations and I attempt to highlight topics that are particularly uncertain and which new theoretical and observational studies are likely to lead to important advances.

Video

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10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Gravity for astronomers
Tom Richtler (Universidad de Concepción)

Abstract

Conceiving gravity as a force that emerges from an unknown microscopic structure, is a new paradigm. Recent progress in the description of gravity as an entropic force enables predictions/"post"-dictions for galaxy dynamics. When disks can be used to determine galaxy masses, these predictions are confirmed with an impressive precision, the well-known MONDIan phenomenology (Milgrom/Bekenstein).

However, deviations as "dark matter poor" or "dark matter rich" galaxies are found for elliptical galaxies. These are still obstacles for a satisfactory and more complete understanding of gravity. 

09:00, Excellence Cluster, Seminar Room in the Basement | ESO Garching
ORIGINS Cluster Visitor Talk
Talk — Neutrino oscillations in IceCube
Philipp Eller (Penn State University)
17/07/19 (Wednesday)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Low energy comsic rays in the Galactic ISM
Fiona Panther (UNSW Canberra)
16/07/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The Search for CP Violation in Neutrinos
Michael Wilking (Stony Brook Univ.)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Galaxies lacking dark matter in the Illustris simulation
Moritz Haslbauer (Bonn University)

Abstract

Any viable cosmological model in which galaxies interact predicts the existence of primordial and tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs). In particular, in the standard model of cosmology (LCDM), according to the dual dwarf galaxy theorem, there must exist both primordial dark matter-dominated and dark matter-free TDGs with different radii. I use the hydrodynamical cosmological Illustris-1 simulation to identify tidal dwarf galaxy candidates and study their present-day physical properties. In particular, I will discuss the positions of galaxies in the radius-mass plane depending on their nonbaryonic content and compare it with observational data. I will explain the implications of the dual dwarf theorem for a LCDM cosmology. Finally, I will discuss the occurrence of NGC 1052-DF2-type objects.

11:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — The Beta-Skeleton view of the cosmic web
Jaime Forero-Romero (Los Andes Univ.)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — CMB spectral distortions from the coherent oscillations of axions
Bryce Cyr (McGill Univ.)
10:00, Excellence Cluster, Seminar Room in the Basement | ESO Garching
ORIGINS Cluster Visitor Talk
Talk — Searching for new physics using machine learning techniques
David Handl (LMU)
15/07/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — 'Hubble tension': what can we learn from an inverse distance ladder with strong gravitational lenses and Type Ia supernovae?
Stefan Taubenberger (MPA)
12/07/19 (Friday)
09:45, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO Talk
Talk — Dynamical fate of planetary systems in star clusters with N-body simulations
Francesco Flammini (Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool Univ.)
11/07/19 (Thursday)
14:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Observing Angular Momentum Transfer in Star Formation: Disk Formation, Binary Formation and Wind Launching
Yichen Zhang (RIKEN)

Abstract

How angular momentum is redistributed during accretion of material toward the central protostar is a key issue to understand the formation of stars, which is related to the disk formation, binary formation, as well as outflow launching. In this talk, I will report some of our recent results related to these topics, using high-resolution high-sensitivity observations of ALMA towards both low and high-mass protostellar objects. In the massive protostellar source G339.88-1.26, we detect rotational features in various molecular emissions. Based on their spatial distributions and kinematics, we find that they trace different parts of the envelope-disk system, such as the inner Keplerian disk, the outer Keplerian disk, and the infalling-rotating envelope surrounding the disk. These results indicate that an ordered transition from an infalling-rotating envelope to a Keplerian disk, accompanied by change of chemical composition, is a valid description, not only for low-mass protostellar sources as previous studies have shown, but also for massive sources, which supports a similar way of forming massive stars as low-mass stars. In the massive protostellar source IRAS07299-1651, the observations reveal a forming massive binary with an apparent separation of 180 au. From the line-of-sight velocity difference of the two protostars measured from hydrogen recombination lines, the binary is estimated to have a minimum total mass of 18 Msun, consistent with several other metrics. The hydrogen recombination line also reveals a rotating ring around the primary. The results suggest that disk fragmentation at several hundred au may have formed the binary, and much smaller disks are feeding the individual protostars. In the low-mass protostar NGC1333 IRAS4C, we detected a rotating outflow.  As the distance to the central source increases, the rotation velocity of the outflow decreases while the outflow radius increases, which gives a flat specific angular momentum distribution along the outflow. The mean specific angular momentum of the outflow is about 100 au km/s. Based on reasonable assumptions on the outward velocity of the outflow and the protostar mass, we estimate the range of outflow launching radii to be 5-15 au. Such a launching radius is more consistent with a slow disk wind launched from relatively large radii on the disk. These results provide promising targets for future close-up studies of disk formation, binary formation, and outflow launching, and how angular momentum is transferred among these components to allow accretion happens.

11:00, Excellence Cluster, Seminar Room in the Basement | ESO Garching
ORIGINS Cluster Visitor Talk
Talk — Origin of the obscuration in AGNs
Keiichi Wada (Kagoshima Univ., Japan)
10/07/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Tests of General Relativity and the Black Hole paradigm with GRAVITY
Oliver Pfuhl (MPE)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — VLT in the 2030s
Antoine Mérand, Bruno Leibundgut, Michael Sterzik (ESO)

Abstract

We will briefly report on the recent workshop “The VLT in 2030” which was held in Garching two weeks ago: https://eso.org/sci/meetings/2019/VLT2030.html. After the introduction, we will discuss what you may have learned at the workshop, if you attended, or answer questions you may have, if you did not attend the workshop.

09/07/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — University of Helsinki
Oleg Lebedev (The Higgs and Cosmology)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — On the effect of stellar- and AGN-triggered galactic outflows in cosmological simulations of late-type galaxies
Milena Valentini (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa)

Abstract

Stellar feedback triggers galactic outflows and is a crucial component in simulations of galaxy formation. Galactic outflows contribute to the continuous interaction between galaxies and their surrounding medium, and allow for the interplay between stars and the different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM).

I investigate the impact of galactic outflow modelling on the formation and evolution of a disc galaxy, by performing a suite of cosmological simulations with initial conditions of a Milky Way-sized halo. In this talk, I will show how sensitive the general properties of the simulated galaxy are to the way in which stellar feedback triggered outflows are implemented, comparing results obtained by adopting different galactic outflow models. I will discuss the key requirements that a feedback model must have to be successful in producing a disc-dominated galaxy and the crucial importance of galactic outflows in reproducing observational features of present-day disc galaxies.

Also, I will show how the inclusion of AGN feedback impacts on the evolution of galaxies and on their properties, and I will discuss the key interplay between AGN and stellar feedback across cosmic time in cosmological simulations. I will focus on how feedback energy from the central BH couples to the different phases of the ISM, how the joint AGN and stellar feedback guarantees the large-scale cosmological accretion of gas on to the forming galaxy, controls the BH growth, triggers galactic outflows, and determines the BH-galaxy co-evolution. 

I will discuss the connection between chemical evolution and gas dynamics, to interpret observations of metal abundance in the ISM and circumgalactic medium. I will also present results that show the impact of the AGN feedback on the metal content of ISM and stars in galaxies, comparing predictions from my simulations with observations. 

11:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — The effect of gravitational recoil on black hole growth and scaling relation
David Izquierdo Villalba (San Sebastian)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — The impact of black holes on the survival of star clusters
Long Wang (Uni. of Bonn)
08/07/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Galactic outflows in the TNG50 simulation
Dylan Nelson (MPA)
05/07/19 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Metric Gaussian Variational Inference
Jakob Knollmueller (MPA)
12:00, Excellence Cluster, Seminar Room in the Basement | ESO Garching
ORIGINS Cluster Visitor Talk
Talk — The time evolution of heavy quarkonium in a non-equilibrium quark-gluon plasma
Miguel Escobedo (EHU, Spain)
04/07/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — What Processes Shape our Milky Way's Disk?
Hans-Walter Rix (MPIA, Heidelberg)
Download video |

Abstract

It is often said that the Milky Way can serve as a 'model organism' to explore and understand the physical mechanism that shape galaxies from random initial fluctuations into the beautiful island universes we see today.

This statement is true, but easily said and much harder to make a reality. Over the last years I have collaborated with a number of students, post-docs and visitors at MPIA combining spectral surveys and now Gaia to turn this Galactic Archeology mantra into astrophysical insights.

In this talk I will synthesize some of this effort, focusing on two aspects of our Galaxy's main component, its disk: what sets the overall radial profile of the disk,  and what sets its vertical structure? The answers to both questions are linked to the question of how much dynamical memory loss our Galaxy has incurred --  its exceptionally quiescent history. I believe we are now considerably closer to understanding why disk galaxies look the way they do.

Video

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14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — Probing Fundamental Physics and Cosmic Structure with current and future Microwave Surveys
Mike Niemack (Cornwell University)

Abstract

The cosmic microwave background (CMB) has proven to be a powerful probe of the physics and cosmology of our universe. CMB observations are helping to address fundamental questions, such as the nature of dark energy and dark matter, and are being used to constrain the physics of inflation at energies a trillion times higher than the Large Hadron Collider. Recent measurements have led to exciting progress in several areas, from improved constraints on cosmological parameters via CMB polarization to the discovery of galaxy clusters and characterization of their large-scale velocities. One focus of our current research is combining measurements from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) with optical galaxy surveys to characterize pairwise galaxy cluster velocities. Beyond the ACT, the CCAT-prime and Simons Observatory projects are building six-meter-aperture ultra-high optical throughput telescopes to illuminate many times more microwave detectors than existing telescopes. With CCAT-prime we plan to pursue new galaxy cluster and carbon intensity mapping measurements to understand the epoch of reionization in addition to CMB research. These high-throughput telescopes are designed to work together with smaller aperture telescopes in a next generation “Stage-IV” CMB survey, which we will use to probe models of inflation, light relics, and cosmic structure with unprecedented precision.

03/07/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Simulations for Cluster-Based Cosmology
Camille Avestruz (Argonne Nat. Lab/U Michigan)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Planets or not planets? The ALMA/MUSE revolution in young planet detection
Stefano Facchini (ESO)
02/07/19 (Tuesday)
14:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Seminar
Talk — Interacting Outflow Phases: Kinematics Multiwavelength Signatures
Aditi Vijayan (RRI Bangalore)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Characterising the Circum-Galactic Medium: Observations and Simulations
Ramona Augustin (LAM)

Abstract

Understanding the processes of gas flows in and out of galaxies is crucial in galaxy evolution studies. Yet, observations of the faint and diffuse Circum-Galactic Medium (CGM), where these processes take place, remain challenging.

The most efficient approach to detect this faint and diffuse gas is in absorption towards bright background quasars. However, to investigate the CGM we need to also identify the galaxy counterpart and connect it to the absorption feature.

In this context we characterised counterparts to Damped Lyman-alpha Absorbers (DLAs) at z~1 using HST broad-band images. We measured their stellar masses and find them to be generally less massive than the average galaxy population. We also discovered their complex morphology and environments, challenging the interpretation of CGM studies in absorption.

Beyond absorption, prospects to map the CGM in emission will offer new information on its extent and clumpiness. To optimise observing strategies of the CGM in emission, we have made predictions from dedicated cosmological zoom-in RAMSES simulations. We post-processed galaxy halos with an emission model to create mock integral field observations. Using the instrument model, our results indicate that ELT/HARMONI will enter a regime of low surface brightness typical of the CGM which is not attainable with current facilities.

11:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Strong lens simulations: the 'un'-natural telescopes to probe galaxy formation and Hubble constant
Sampath Mukherjee (Uni. of Liege)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Machine Learning for CMB physics
Moritz Munchmeyer (Perimeter Institute)
01/07/19 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Introduction to Influence Theory: From Foundational Physics to a New Approach to Unification
Kevin Knuth (State Univ.of New York at Albany)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — GLaD: Gravitational Lensing and Dynamics combined analysis to unveil properties of high-redshift galaxies
Giulia Chirivi (MPA)

June 2019

28/06/19 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
27/06/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Galaxy Cluster Evolution over the Past 10 Billion Years
Michael McDonald (MIT Kavli Institute)
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Abstract

In recent years, the number of known galaxy clusters at high redshift has grown dramatically thanks in large part to the success of surveys utilizing the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effect. In particular, surveys carried out by the South Pole Telescope have facilitated the discovery of hundreds of new distant clusters, allowing us to trace, for the first time, the evolution of clusters from shortly after their collapse (z~2) to present day (z~0). In this talk, I will highlight recent efforts by our group to understand the observed evolution in the most massive clusters, including: the enrichment history of the intracluster medium, the merging history of clusters, the cooling and formation of cool cores, the growth of central cluster galaxies, and the evolution of the central radio-loud AGN.  In addition, I will attempt summarize the current state of ongoing and planned SPT surveys, and the synergies with current and future observatories including eRosita and Athena.

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26/06/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — The Formation History of Galaxies: Star Formation and Quiescence
Corentin Schreiber (Oxford)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Update on the Zwicky Transient Facility
Shri Kulkarni (Caltech)
25/06/19 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Downsizing of Star Formation: Weighing Dark Matter Haloes Hosting Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies
Kirsten Hall (Johns Hopkins University)

Abstract

Powerful quasars can be seen out to large distances. As they reside in massive dark matter haloes, they provide a useful tracer of large-scale structure. Stacking far-infrared and sub-millimeter maps on the locations of quasars has proved a useful tool in studying quasars and their environments. We stack Herschel-SPIRE images at 250, 350, and 500 μm at the location of 11,235 quasars in 10 redshift bins spanning 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 3.5. The unresolved dust emission of the quasar and its host galaxy dominate on instrumental beam scales, while extended emission is spatially resolved on physical scales of order a megaparsec. This emission is due to dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) clustered around the dark matter haloes hosting quasars. We measure radial surface brightness profiles of the stacked images to compute the angular correlation function of DSFGs correlated with quasars. We then model the profiles to determine large-scale clustering properties of quasars and DSFGs as a function of redshift. We adopt a halo model and parametrize it by the most effective halo mass at hosting star-forming galaxies, finding log(M_eff/M_⊙)=(13.8+/0.1) at z = 2.21-2.32, and, at z = 0.5-0.81, the mass is log(M_eff/M_⊙)=(10.7+/-0.2). Our results indicate a downsizing of dark matter haloes hosting DSFGs between 0.5 ≤ z ≲ 2.9. The derived dark matter halo masses are consistent with other measurements of star-forming and sub-millimeter galaxies. The physical properties of DSFGs inferred from the halo model depend on details of the quasar halo occupation distribution in ways that we explore at z > 2.5, where the quasar HOD parameters are not well constrained.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Unveiling modified gravity using cosmic voids
Enrique Pailas (PUC, Chile)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — ALMA measurement of Variable Accretion in Deeply Embedded Protostars
Logan Francis (UVic)

Abstract

The earliest stages of star formation begin with the gravitational collapse of a molecular cloud core to a protostar and circumstellar disk, both surrounded by an extended envelope of gas and dust. The protostar assembles most of its mass through accretion from the disk during its youngest, deeply embedded period, with the accretion rate expected to be variable due to disk instabilities, planet/companion interaction, and other mechanisms. However, direct constraints on the accretion rate for the youngest stage are difficult to obtain in the optical and near-IR due to extinction by nascent dust. Millimeter observations can indirectly trace changes in the accretion rate by monitoring the temperature response of the dusty disk and envelope to a change in the accretion luminosity. The strongest response is expected at the spatial scales of the disk, which can be measured using the the high resolution provided by the Atacama Large (sub)Millimeter Array (ALMA). In this seminar, I will discuss techniques for time domain surveys with interferometers, and present preliminary results from our ongoing ALMA surveys to measure accretion variability in a sample of deeply embedded protostars.

24/06/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Normal Hydrogen Rich Supernovae and their progenitors
Alexandra Kozyreva (MPA)
19/06/19 (Wednesday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Biermann Lectures
Prof. Anatoly Spitkovsky (Princeton University)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Early-type Galaxies: Climbing to the Top of the Mass Ladder
Eric Emsellem (ESO)
10:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
HEG Seminar
Talk — Spectral variability signatures of diffusive shock acceleration in blazar jets
Markus Boettcher (North-West University Potchefstroom, ZA)
18/06/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Steps beyond the Standard Model: searching for simplicity
Mikhail Shaposhnikov (Ecole Polytechnique Fed. de Lausanne)
17/06/19 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Quantum thermalization of closed systems and its breakdown
David Luitz (MPI for Physics of Complex Systems (Dresden))
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Comparing Ray-by-Ray and Fully Multidimensional Neutrino Transport in 3D Core-Collapse Supernova Simulations
Robert Glas (MPA)
14/06/19 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
13/06/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Chemical evolution of the Milky Way
Else Starkenburg (Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam)
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Abstract

The Milky Way halo consists of old and metal-poor stars amidst bound substructures such as globular clusters and satellite dwarf galaxies. A comparison of stellar abundance ratios and kinematics between typical halo stars and these bound substructures reveals many interesting patterns that give us clues about their chemical evolution - a process called Galactic archaeology. The lowest metallicity stars that still exist today probably carry the imprint of very few supernova and push Galactic archaeology to its limits. These stars represent our best observational approach to understand the First Stars and the early Galaxy. In this talk I will review cosmological modelling predictions for observations of these very old and metal-poor stars as well as observational efforts and results. In particular, I will present results of the Pristine survey, a Franco-Canadian photometric survey of the Milky Way halo designed to efficiently decompose the metallicity structures of the Milky Way halo. I will show how we can use this great discriminatory power to hunt successfully for the very rare extremely metal-poor stars, to study metal-poor dwarf galaxies, and to search for stellar structures in the halo.

 

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14:00, TUM Garching, Physik Department, HS 2 | ESO Garching
Theoretical High Energy Physics Seminar
Talk — Rock 'n' Roll Solutions to the Hubble Tension
Lisa Randall (Harvard Univ.)
12/06/19 (Wednesday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Colloquium
Talk — Measuring the heavens: from the human eye to ELTs
Roberto Gilmozzi (ESO)
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Abstract

Observational astronomy, a field several thousand years old, has been dominated for most of its history by the human eye, which acted as both optics and detector. Important discontinuities provided enormous advances both in collecting area and detectors (e.g. the telescope, photographic plates, solid state detectors etc), increasing immensely the parameter space of discovery. Today most of these advances are close to their full potential and new progress is mostly predicated on ever larger telescopes. I will give a brief overview of the history of the field, discuss some of the solutions developed to produce larger and larger primaries and describe some of the science driving this effort. Finally, I will touch on the current development of Extremely Large Telescopes and on future possibilities.

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14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Pushing MUSE at its edge (~ 9300 Å): Probing Quasars Circum-galactic Medium at the Cosmic Dawn
Emanuele Paolo Farina (MPIA)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Extreme Plasma Astrophysics
Dmitri A. Uzdensky (Univ. of Colorado Boulder)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — 15 years of star forming galaxy Main Sequence
Paola Popesso (Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universität München)

Abstract

How and when the stellar mass content of galaxies is assembled is still one of the main questions of galaxy evolution studies. The existence of a very tight relation between the galaxy star formation rate (SFR) and the stellar mass (M*) suggests that most galaxies form their stars at a level mainly dictated by their stellar masses and regulated by secular processes. Such relation, called the Main Sequence (MS) of star forming galaxies, is in place from redshift ~0 up to ~4 and it is considered one of the most useful tools in astrophysics to study the evolution of the  star formation activity in galaxies.

More than 500 papers in the literature explored in the past 15 years, with a variety of star formation rate indicators and techniques, how the slope and scatter of the relation evolve across cosmic time. I will show that, when all of the selection effects are taken into account, all these results point to a rather consistent  picture, with surprising consequences for the cosmic star formation history of the Universe.

11/06/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Imaging and detection of charged particles using the Medipix and Timepix chips
Michael Campbell (CERN)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Disc-Jet-Wind interaction in black hole X-ray binaries
Efrain Gatuzz (ESO)

Abstract

X-ray binaries, composed of a compact object (neutron star or black hole) orbiting around a companion star, constitute an excellent environment to study accretion phenomena, one of the most promising challenges in modern astrophysics. Outstanding open topics include the interplay between outflows (in the form of collimated winds or relativistic jets) and discs, the accretion-radiation energy balance, the radiative feedback and the relation between relativistic jets and the fundamental properties of the black holes (e.g. spin). Here, we report the analysis of two black hole low mass X-ray binaries, 4U 1630-47 and IGR J17091-3624, using X-ray high-resolution spectra. In the case of 4U 1630-47, we found that the absence of lines in the transitional state cannot be attributed to an evolution of the plasma caused by thermal instabilities. For IGR J17091-3624 we identified a local X-ray absorber during a hard-intermediate accretion state. This is the first detection of a local not-outflowing absorber simultaneously with a compact jet emission.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Voids as cosmological laboratories
Carlos Correa (Uni. Cordoba, Argentina)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Deuteration of N2H+ and HCO+ in the prestellar core L1544
Elena Redaelli (MPE)
07/06/19 (Friday)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Fermi Bubbles blown by a Galactic wind: simulations & observations
Prateek Sharma (IISc Bangalore, MPA)
06/06/19 (Thursday)
13:45, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Lectures
Talk — Alternative Models of Dark Matter: Ultra Light fields, Part II
Elisa Ferreira (MPA)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Lectures
Talk — Alternative Models of Dark Matter: Ultra Light fields, Part II
Elisa Ferreira (MPA)
05/06/19 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — DeepThought DPR: Distributed peer review enhanced with natural language processing and machine learning
Wolfgang Kerzendorf (Michigan State University)

Abstract

While ancient scientist often have patrons to fund their work, peer review of proposals for the allocation of resources is a foundation of modern science. A very common method is that proposals are evaluated by a small panel of experts (due to logistics and funding limitations) nominated by the grant-giving institutions. The expert panel process introduces several issues - most notably: 1) biases introduced in the selection of the panel. 2) experts have to read a very large number of proposals given a very limited time. Distributed Peer Review promises to alleviate several of the described problems. In this process, the task of reviewing is distributed among the proposers. Each proposer is given a limited number of proposals to review and rank. The process promises – among others – making grant allocation more transparent, making the voices of junior scientists heard, and lowering the load of review tasks on the senior academics. We present the result of an experiment running a distributed peer review process for allocation of telescope time at the European Southern Observatory. We have introduced several enhancements to the ‘classic’ distributed peer review, including using natural language processing and machine learning algorithms in identifying research expertise, and the addition of a step to provide an evaluation of the reviews encouraging the reviewers to provide useful feedback. The results of our experiment show a very high success rate in predicting the expertise of reviewers given proposals. The general experience has been overwhelmingly praised by the participating community (using an anonymous feedback mechanism). I will give an overview of our experiment in this talk.

04/06/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The ECHo experiment
Loredana Gastaldo (Uni Heidelberg)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Pyxel: The imaging detector simulation framework
David Lucsanyi (ESA)

Abstract

Pyxel is a novel, end-to-end detection chain simulation framework in Python, designed to host and combine existing and new models, i.e. code simulating instrumental effects such as optical diffraction, charge deposition by cosmic rays, charge diffusion, detector Point Spread Function, readout noise sources, Charge Transfer Inefficiency in CCDs or persistence in CMOS-based imaging detectors.

This simulation framework has been developed in order to alleviate the need for re-developing a new specific simulation tool for every new instrument onboard space mission or ground observatories and instead share and transfer resources and knowledge.

Pyxel is an easy-to-use, flexible and multi-purpose tool to support instrument development during all phases, e.g. to generate synthetic data, support data processing and analysis , estimate performance, understand criticalities, investigate problem areas or trade between different technologies.

It is developed at the European Space Agency in collaboration with the European Southern Observatory, and will be released soon as an open-source software. Our goal is to establish a worldwide collaboration based on Pyxel to share simulation codes and resources, initiate and facilitate the knowledge transfer within the instrumentation community.

03/06/19 (Monday)
17:15, HS2, Physik TUM Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy: The Swiss Army Knife for understanding spin-orbit phenomena
Justin Shaw (NIST, Boulder, Colorado)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Astronomy outreach as a tool for diplomacy & peace: Experiences from the Columba-Hypatia project
Francesca Fragkoudi (MPA)

May 2019

31/05/19 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Bayesian population studies of short gamma-ray bursts
Michael Burgess (MPE)
29/05/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Properties of metal-poor transitional and degenerate brown dwarfs
Zenghua Zhang (Observatory of Paris)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Measuring Masses of Single Stars through Relativistic Deflection
Kailash C. Sahu (Space Telescope Science Institute)

Abstract

In a reprise of the famous 1919 solar-eclipse experiment that confirmed general relativity, the nearby white dwarf Stein 2051B passed very close to a 19th magnitude background star in 2014. As it passed in front, Stein 2051B caused a deflection of the background star's image by ~2 milliarcsec, which we observed with HST at 8 different epochs. This allowed us to determine the mass of Stein 2051B using this technique of astrometric microlensing for the first time outside the solar system. Our measured mass of Stein 2051B, the sixth- nearest white dwarf, provides confirmation of the physics of degenerate matter, and lends support for white-dwarf evolutionary theory. The recent Gaia data allow accurate prediction of many such upcoming events which can be used to determine accurate masses of single stars.

28/05/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The Amplitudes Frontier
David Kosower (IPhT)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — (topic to be announced)
Christine Simpson (Chicago)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Formation of Supermassive Black Holes from Population III.1 Seeds
Jonathan Tan (UVA)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Planets or Dust Clumps? Searching for Planets within Evolved Disks
Michael Ireland (Australian National University)

Abstract

There are now a long list of direct imaging “planet” discoveries (some with question marks in their title) that have shown to be unexpected infrared disk features. These objects include T Cha, LkCa 15 and HD 169142. I will outline why these features were unexpected based on naive radiative transfer models, and why the planet hypothesis was often preferred in the past. I will show that our current knowledge of the distribution and luminosity of giant planets explains why direct imaging is so hard, will explain how disk features can be much brighter than previously expected due to “exotic” dust compositions, and how radiative acceleration, dust settling and gas drag sorts dust grains to create such “exotic” dust. Finally, if I haven’t run out of time, I will discuss alternative approaches to detecting giant planets, in particular spectro-astrometry of accretion shocks in the context of objects like PDS 70 and GSC 6214b.

27/05/19 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Physics of the Bacterial Flagellar Motor
Ashley Nord (Ctr. de Biochimie, de Montpellier)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — FFT-based forward modeling for radio interferometric gravitational lens observations
Devon Powell (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Introduction to Optical and Infrared Detector Systems for ground based astronomy
Derek Ives (ESO)

Abstract

A basic introduction is given to optical and IR detectors for ground based astronomical instrumentation. This will include a bottom up description of the techniques employed by the manufacturers to give the very best performance demanded by us.

It will also include a brief description of the external detector electronics required to drive these beasts as well as touching on some of the characterisation testing we do here at ESO. Real devices will be on show.

24/05/19 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Stellar Models: Current Status, Main Problems and Future Directions
Marco Limongi (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma)

Abstract

Stars constitute the building blocks of much of the visible Universe, therefore the understanding of their evolution and nucleosynthesis is a key astrophysical goal for the future. In particular, the knowledge of the structure, evolution and nucleosynthesis of stars, both as single objects and as part of stellar aggregates, is crucial for our understanding of the chemical evolution of the galaxies, of the resolved stellar populations in Galactic and extragalactic environments, for the definition of standard candles to be used in the cosmic distance ladder, for robustly measuring ages, for dating the oldest stellar systems and in turn the universe itself.

However, despite the great effort of several groups over the last 30 years devoted to achieve a satisfactory level of accuracy and reliability of the stellar evolutionary codes, the predictive power of the present stellar models is still limited by a number of uncertainties due to the poor knowledge of some fundamental physical phenomena.

In this talk I will review the current status of the most updated stellar models, their uncertainties and what we plan for the future to improve the most important limitations of their predictive power.

23/05/19 (Thursday)
14:30, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — We're going to the Moon. I'll bring the Lego...
Alastair Bruce (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh)

Abstract

Journey with a space-race geek who never got to see a Saturn V fly and still won't forgive himself for missing a Space Shuttle launch. We're going to the Moon, Apollo-style — I’ll bring the Lego.

11:00, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — We're going to the Moon. I'll bring the Lego...
Alastair Bruce (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh)

Abstract

Journey with a space-race geek who never got to see a Saturn V fly and still won't forgive himself for missing a Space Shuttle launch. We're going to the Moon, Apollo-style — I’ll bring the Lego.

22/05/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — We're going to the Moon. I'll bring the Lego...
Alastair Bruce (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh)

Abstract

Journey with a space-race geek who never got to see a Saturn V fly and still won't forgive himself for missing a Space Shuttle launch. We're going to the Moon, Apollo-style — I’ll bring the Lego.

12:00, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — We're going to the Moon. I'll bring the Lego...
Alastair Bruce (Royal Observatory, Edinburgh)

Abstract

Journey with a space-race geek who never got to see a Saturn V fly and still won't forgive himself for missing a Space Shuttle launch. We're going to the Moon, Apollo-style — I’ll bring the Lego.

10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Raman scattering of laser guide-star photons: from forgotten nuisance to observatory asset
Frédéric Vogt (ESO)

Abstract

The presence of Raman-scattered laser guide-star photons above the VLT was first reported in 2017. Here, I will present the outcome of a series of dedicated follow-up observations of the 4LGSF up-link laser beams acquired with MUSE and ESPRESSO.

From a series of MUSE observations acquired over a 27 month period, we find evidence that dust on the primary and secondary mirror of the telescope is responsible for up to (60+-5)% of the laser light contaminating MUSE WFM-AO observations. As such, laser lines provide an ideal, non-invasive means to monitor the scatter properties of the UT4 telescope mirrors on a sub-nightly basis. This could allow, for example, to assess (with a single metric) the qualitative impact of operating with high-particle counts, and the ability of CO2 cleanings to mitigate long-term consequences.

In February 2018, we used ESPRESSO to acquire a high-resolution (R~140'000) spectra of one 4LGSF up-link laser beam. The richness of the Raman spectra associated with the laser beam, revealed in a spectacular fashion by ESPRESSO, provides an ideal and unique means to characterize the as-built accuracy of the ESPRESSO spectrograph.

Altogether, these observations demonstrate that laser guide-star systems at astronomical observatories ought to not only be thought of as mere sub-components of complex adaptive optics systems, but also as powerful monitoring tools and accurate spectral calibration sources: both for existing and upcoming facilities.

21/05/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Imaging Black Holes with the Event Horizon Telescope
Heino Falcke (Radboud University Nijmegen)
12:30, IPP big seminar room 296 (L6 building) | ESO Garching
IPP Talk
Talk — Parker Solar Probe: Initial observations and future perspectives
Marco Velli (UCLA)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — AGN demography with JWST and ALMA
Hugo Messias (ALMA Observatory)

Abstract

With available X-ray surveys getting to extreme deep levels with Chandra (~1e-17erg/s/cm2) and probing harder energies with NuSTAR (8-24keV), one may wonder how JWST or ALMA will contribute to obscured-AGN demography. Although deep spectroscopy will be enabled with spectroscopic instrumentation on board JWST (especially with MIRI) and ALMA, such modes are still regarded as follow-up tools for this purpose. This presentation aims at showing how deep high-spatial resolution NIRCam and MIRI broad-band imaging combined with ALMA can excel in what obscured-AGN demography and host-characterisation is concerned with respect to what is currently achieved by X-ray surveys. I will show one way to pursue a telescope-time-efficient survey aiming at selecting AGN up to redshift 2 (and potentially to redshift 6), and what currently planned JWST GTO and ERS projects lack in that regard. Extra science questions such a JWST-ALMA team-up could address in addition "for free" (e.g., high-redshift source selection) will be briefly highlighted.

11:00, MPA room 006 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Binary accretion models and the Gravitational Wave Background
Magdalena Siwek (CfA)
11:00, MPA room 006 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Multi-line synergies for probing the epoch of reionization
Caroline Heneka (SNS, Pisa)
20/05/19 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Optimized quantum photonics
Gunnar Schroeder (Forschungszentrum Juelich)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The Dark Matter mass function with strong gravitational lensing
Elisa Ritondale (MPA)
17/05/19 (Friday)
16:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
CarSem Seminar
Talk — From star formation to startup scouting
Vlas Sokolov (Data Engineer, INNOSPOT GmbH)
16/05/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Decoding the Magnetic Universe
Sui Ann Mao (Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy)

Abstract

Dynamically important magnetic fields have been shown to play pivotal roles in processes that are closely linked to galaxy evolution. However, how galaxies and their magnetic fields have co-evolved since the early Universe remains an unsolved fundamental question in astro-plasma physics and cosmology. In this talk, I will describe how the advent of broadband radio polarimetry is revolutionizing the field of cosmic magnetism by enabling unambiguous and precise polarization measurements. Then, I will highlight several innovative studies on mapping galactic magnetic fields near and far: from the Milky Way/ nearby galaxies to distant galaxies. I will conclude by discussing the exciting prospects of decoding the origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields with Spare Kilometre Array pathfinders and the next generation radio telescopes.

11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — The Extremely Luminous Quasar Surveys - Understanding the bright quasar population at cosmic noon
Jan-Torge Schindler (MPIA)
15/05/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Numerical Experiments on Star Formation: Mass Functions and Angular Momenta
Lee Hartmann (CfA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — The curious case of the SMC supergiant star LHA 115-S 18
Liz Bartlett (ESO)

Abstract

Since its discovery by Henize (1956), numerous observations have been made of the supergiant B[e] star LHA 115-S 18 (S18). The optical spectrum of the star is characterised by strong emission in the Balmer series and prominent He I lines as well as a wealth of forbidden and permitted low excitation metallic lines. Following the behaviour observed in other sgB[e] stars, the high excitation lines are broader than the metallic lines and exhibit pronounced variability in profile and strength – the Balmer lines evolve from (asymmetric) single peaked to P Cygni profiles and vary in strength by a factor of ∼3 (Zickgraf et al. 1989; Nota et al. 1996). The most dramatic variability, however, is seen in the He II 4686 Å line, which has been observed to transition from absence to being comparable in strength to H Beta, with such changes occurring over short timescales (of the order of months; Shore et al. 1987). Clark et al.(2013) used archival spectroscopic and photometric data to show that whilst S18 trivially satisfies the eponymous classification criteria of LBVs, it does not conform to their typical behaviour as outlined by Humphreys & Davidson (1994): The photometric variability occurs at unprecedented rapidity and these spectral and photometric changes appear completely uncorrelated, in stark contrast to the behaviour of normal LBVs. S18 has been detected at X-ray wavelengths both by Chandra (in 2002) and XMM-Newton in (2003) with L_X~10^33 erg/s, however, in a deeper XMM observations in 2006, the source was undetected, suggesting a factor 10 variability at X-ray wavelengths.

Since mid 2014, S18 has been monitored spectroscopically, with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), and photometrically as part of the OGLE project then the by the Remote Observatory in the Atacama desert (ROAD). In July 2018 a VLT XSHOOTER spectrum revealed that the source was transitioning into its ''hot'' state (in which He II 4686 A is at maximum), a state never monitored and a transition that has never before been observed. We were granted a further 10 hours of observations with XShooter and 14 hours with SALT. The target is also being monitored at X-ray wavelengths as part of the Swift monitoring of the High Mass X-ray Binary population of the SMC. Far from finally revealing the nature of this enigmatic target, however, this dataset, and specifically the XSHOOTER data, has revealed yet more unexpected and unexplained behaviour including a strong UV excess at wavelengths < 360 nm, similar to those reported in Young Stellar Objects (Manara et al. 2016). In this discussion session, I aim to summarise all the data from this "outburst" and, with the help of the participants, finally find an answer to the question "What is LHA 115-S 18?"

14/05/19 (Tuesday)
14:00, MPA room 006 | ESO Garching
EU Research Framework Programme
Talk — EU Grants and Fellowships for Post-Docs in Horizon 2020
Rajima Smailji (EU office, MPQ)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Ruling Star Formation: the galaxy host-halo connection
Paola Popesso (TUM)

Abstract

Central and satellite galaxies are strictly connected to the global and local properties of their host halo, although in very different ways. While the stellar mass of the central galaxy is tightly correlated with the host halo mass, satellites might go through a complex mix of processes involving the erosion of their hot and cold gas and stellar component.

I will show how these connections can be used to understand the distribution of galaxies in the SFR-stellar mass plane up to z~1.2 using SDSS and COSMOS data. I will show that the Main Sequence of star forming galaxies and its scatter as a function of stellar mass are consistent with a re-scaled version of the local relation and distribution, shifted at higher values of SFR according to (1+z)^3. The relations bends at high stellar masses, where central galaxies of massive halos, as groups and clusters, dominate in number. Low mass satellite  dominate the region of quiescence at very low star formation activity at any redshift. I will argue that the MS bending at the high stellar mass end is due to two processes: i) the formation of a bulge component as a consequence of the increased merger rate in groups and clusters, and ii) the cold gas starvation induced by the hot halo environment, which limits the gas inflow onto the disk. The latter process leads to a systematic decrease of the availability of molecular gas at any stellar mass in groups and clusters with respect to lower mass halos. Similarly, the increase of the MS scatter at high stellar masses is explained by the larger spread of star formation histories of central group and cluster galaxies with respect to lower mass systems.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Smallest halos in thermal wino dark matter
Ayuki Kamada (Inst. for Basic Science, Korea)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — The SPHINX simulations of the first billion years of galaxy evolution and cosmic reionisation
Joakim Rosdahl (CRAL, Lyon)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Insights into planet formation from high resolution ALMA observations of protoplanetary disks
Jane Huang (CfA Harvard)

Abstract

Simulations of planet-disk interactions have long predicted that giant protoplanets can induce the formation of rings, spiral arms, and high contrast asymmetries in protoplanetary disks, but for most sources it only recently became possible to detect such structures with the advent of high-resolution, high-sensitivity telescope facilities. I will present the results of the Disk Substructures at High Angular Resolution Program (DSHARP), the first high angular resolution ALMA survey of protoplanetary disks. Concentric rings and gaps are the most common type of substructure observed and can be found in disks spanning a wide range of ages and stellar host spectral types. A small fraction of disks also feature spiral arms or high-contrast asymmetries. The widespread presence of these complex substructures in young disks suggest that giant planet formation may occur readily within a million years. The results of  DSHARP, in conjunction with other recent ALMA studies, suggest that high angular resolution millimeter wavelength observations will be key for characterizing young planet demographics.

13/05/19 (Monday)
17:15, HS2, Physik TUM Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Dynamics of reaction networks
Bernold Fiedler (Freie Uni Berlin)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Towards cosmological simulations with individual stars and a multiphase ISM
Thales Gutcke (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Astrophotos: Improve your paper visually (for public & for yourself)
Mahdi Zamani (ESO)

Abstract

Artifacts, background noises, mosaic overlaps, HDR looks, color balance, more exposures, frame composition, etc. are all issues which removing/improving them completely might not affect your scientific output but could help significantly to share your science with the world outside. The discussion will look into the visual improvements which could be done on images by scientists as part of post-processing and data reduction. The talk will be also a quick surf on deep waters of scientific image processing for outreach purposes at ESO.

10/05/19 (Friday)
10:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — The drive to life on wet and icy worlds
Michael Russel (NASA Jet Propulsion Lab.)
09/05/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Exoplanet Atmosphere Characterization, Present and Future
Laura Kreidberg (CfA Harvard)
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Abstract

We now know that exoplanets abound in the Galaxy, with most stars hosting at least one planet. These recently discovered worlds are much more diverse than the planets in the Solar System, and raise many questions about their formation, evolution, and habitability. To address these questions, we turn to atmosphere characterization, which provides a wealth of additional information about the planets. I will discuss the state of the art in atmosphere studies, focusing on recent high-precision, space-based observations of hot Jupiters and warm Neptunes. These studies have already revealed planetary atmospheric chemistry, climate, and cloud coverage in unprecedented detail, and they are poised for a revolutionary advance thanks to a series of new and upcoming missions. I will conclude with a discussion of prospects for characterization of temperate, terrestrial worlds with future facilities.

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13:45, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Lectures
Talk — Superfluid Dark Matter
Elisa Ferreira (MPA)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Lectures
Talk — Superfluid Dark Matter
Elisa Ferreira (MPA)
08/05/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Axions and the Lightest Dark Matter Candidate
David Marsh (Uni Goettingen)
12:30, IPP, Seminar Room L5 | ESO Garching
IPP Talk
Talk — Energy transfer and electron energization in collisionless magnetic reconnection for different guide-field intensities
Fulvia Pucci (National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Tokyo & Princeton University & PPPL)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Science with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)
Bernhard Schulz (NASA Ames Research Ctr.)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Imaging Planet Formation: the Inevitability of Infrared Space Interferometry
Michael Ireland (Australian National University)

Abstract

Directly detection of radiation from extrasolar planets is the premier method for determining exoplanet atmospheric composition. Direct detection of young giant planets can also probe formation processes near the snow line, which is thought to be where giant planet formation is most likely. Existing instruments have largely failed at detecting a significant population of giant planets. I will outline why they have failed, and what is needed to significantly change this and open up a new subfield of observational exoplanet research. I’ll outline the potential for a METIS and a high contrast VLTI instrument (Hi-5/VIKiNG), and describe why eventually space interferometry is needed. I’ll finish by outlining a pathway for space interferometry, and describe why it isn’t has hard as you might think.

07/05/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Precision predictions for electroweak vector-boson scattering
Stefan Dittmaier (Uni. of Freiburg)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Exoplanet Demographics versus Host Star Mass: Clues to Formation from Direct Imaging
Michael Meyer (Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan)

Abstract

The distribution of planetary companion masses, as well as the integrated surface density of companions over fixed mass ranges provide a wealth of information concerning planet formation processes as well as the subsequent dynamical evolution of planetary systems.  However, decoding this information requires large samples of host stars of differing mass.  Here we review recent direct imaging results (e.g. Reggiani et al. 2016) combining predictions for planetary mass distributions as well as very low mass brown dwarf binaries suggesting a local minimum in the companion mass ratio distribution.  We also present preliminary results for the on-going SPHERE SHINE imaging survey on the ESO VLT (Vigan et al. in preparation).  Using constraints on the surface density distribution of gas giant planets we can fit results from radial velocity, imaging, and other techniques with a log-normal that peaks between 1-10 AU (e.g. Meyer et al. 2018).  Finally, we discuss the implications of these results (the local minima in the companion mass ratio and the local maxima in derived surface density distribution of gas giant companions) as a function of stellar mass.  We explore whether gas giant planet mass functions could be universal when considered in ratio to the host star mass and highlight areas where further work is needed.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Testing Cold Dark Matter on galaxy scales with the HI Velocity Function
Aaron Dutton (NYU, Abu Dhabi)
10:30, ESO room Tucana (A.2.02) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Exocometary Science
Luca Matrà (CfA Harvard)
06/05/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The computational challenges of interpreting large scale structure data
Linda Blot (MPA)
15:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — Star formation and the Nature of Dark Matter
Aaron Dutton (NYU, Abu Dhabi)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Chemical composition and physical properties of gases and volatiles in protostellar envelopes and Planet-forming Disks: A new era of JWST
Liton Majumdar (NASA Jet Propulsion Lab.)
03/05/19 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — On Model Selection in Cosmology
Martin Kerscher (LMU Munich)

Abstract

I will review some of the common methods for model selection: the goodness of fit, the likelihood ratio test, Bayesian model selection using Bayes factors, and the classical as well as the Bayesian information theoretic approaches. I will illustrate these different approaches by comparing models for the expansion history of the Universe. I will highlight the premises and objectives entering these different approaches to model selection and finally recommend the information theoretic approach.

02/05/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Gaia’s view of the Milky Way halo
Vasily Belokurov (University of Cambridge)
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Abstract

It was always hoped that one day we would be able to use Gaia data to pin down the matter distribution in the Milky Way, measure the Galactic accretion history, find new previously unseen dwarf galaxies with unprecedentedly low surface brightnesses and track narrow stellar streams to gauge masses of Dark Matter sub-halos. I will show that all of these hopes came true with the last year’s Gaia Data Release 2.

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April 2019

30/04/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Views into the dark through the Higgs window
Oleg Brandt (Uni Heidelberg)
15:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Gender Forum
Talk — Women in Science - The long history of women scientists from a comparative perspective
Annette Vogt (MPIWG)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The molecular gas reservoirs of z~2 galaxies: Comparing dust continuum and CO observations
Melanie Kaasinen (MPIA, Heidelberg)

Abstract

We compare resolved and unresolved observations of the CO and dust continuum emission from star-forming galaxies at z~2. The molecular gas phase of the interstellar medium is a crucial component of star-forming galaxies, hosting, and providing the fuel for, star formation. Constraining the total mass and spatial distribution of molecular gas is therefore critical to understanding the evolutionary state of a galaxy, which can be characterised by how efficiently, and where, star formation is occurring. To determine the total molecular gas mass of high-z galaxies, the community currently relies on two main approaches: measuring either (1) a CO line luminosity, or, (2) dust continuum emission. These molecular gas tracers have been observed for large samples of high-z galaxies with ALMA, and it is assumed that the two lead to equivalent measurements of the molecular gas content. But, recent low-resolution imaging indicates that the CO and dust continuum may trace different galactic regions, with the dust continuum emission being more centrally concentrated. In this talk I will present our comparisons of the CO and dust-derived molecular gas properties of Main Sequence galaxies at z~2 and will discuss the implications for future molecular gas studies with ALMA.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Magnetizing the universe with dwarf galaxies: A new low-frequency radio continuum perspective
Sarrvesh Sridhar (ASTRON)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — How to detect forming planets?
Judit Szulagyi (ETH Zürich)
29/04/19 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Optimized quantum photonics
Jelena Vuckovic (Stanford University, USA)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Unified Superfluid Dark Sector
Elisa Ferreira (MPA)
10:45, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Hands on tutorial with IllustrisTNG public data
Dylan Nelson (MPA)

Abstract

We will discuss simulation outputs from projects such as IllustrisTNG -- what kind of data exists, and how it can be analyzed. I will go quickly through how to use the IllustrisTNG public data release (online), including its documentation, getting started tutorials, and examples for data analysis.

I will lead a short hands-on tutorial showing some basic data analysis. If you wish to follow along (recommended), please bring your laptop. Before Monday, please register for a TNG data release account if you don’t have one already. After this has been approved, please then request access to the JupyterLab service, which I will use for the tutorial. We won’t have time to do any of this on Monday morning. This will be in Python, although it is also possible to work in IDL or Matlab.

We can discuss how to compare the simulations to any type of observation that people may have, and other topics of interest.

25/04/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The empirical bases of the SN-GRB connection
Massimo Della Valle (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte)
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Abstract

We review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are associated with type Ic Supernovae (SNe). Current estimates of SN and GRB rates show that only a tiny fraction of massive stars, likely less than 2%, are able to produce GRBs. The reasons for this small ratio will be discussed.

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11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — (topic to be announced)
Johannes Buchner (MPE)
24/04/19 (Wednesday)
11:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
SESTAS
Talk — New Light on Standard Candles: Testing Hubble Tension using High-precision Observations of Cepheid Variable Stars
Richard I. Anderson (ESO)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Imaging black holes
Jason Dexter (MPE)

Abstract

In the last 6 months, the VLTI/GRAVITY and Event Horizon Telescope experiments have ushered in a new era of spatially resolved studies of event horizon scales around massive black holes. I will discuss the experiments, their first results, and the implications for understanding the role of magnetic fields in black hole accretion and jet launching and for future tests of strong field general relativity.

23/04/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The Cosmological Bootstrap
Daniel Baumann (Univ. of Amsterdam)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Moving and creating cold gas around galaxies
Max Gronke (UCSB)
16/04/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Low-mass dileptons: A thermometer for the hottest stuff in the universe
Torsten Dahms (TUM)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Colloquium
Talk — Imaging Black Holes - First Results from the Event Horizon Telescope
Heino Falcke (Radboud University Nijmegen)
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10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Flying a telescope: the BLAST-TNG experiment
Gabriele Coppi (University of Pennsylvania)

Abstract

BLAST-TNG is a long-duration, high altitude, balloon-borne telescope scheduled to fly in the 2019-2020 season from Antarctica. The data from the 28 day flight will provide new insight into the properties of dust and the role of magnetic fields and its role in the star formation process. BLAST-TNG will observe the sky at three difference wavelength, 250um 350um and 500um, with more than 3000 polarization sensitive KIDs (Kinetic Inductance Detectors) cooled at 270mK.

15/04/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Cosmic gas flows and the distribution of heavy elements in and around galaxies
Freeke van de Voort (MPA)
12/04/19 (Friday)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Merger Shocks in Galaxy Clusters - from Bow Shocks to Runaway Shocks
Congyao Zhang (MPA)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — The role of cluster age on the onset of multiple populations in stellar clusters
Silvia Martocchia (ESO)

Abstract

It is now well established that globular clusters (GCs) host unusual chemical patterns in the form of star-to-star abundance variations in light elements. However, the origin of such multiple stellar populations (MPs) is still far from being understood. The detailed characterisation of MPs is fundamental in our understanding of GC formation, which in turn has consequences for the formation and evolution of galaxies. To this purpose, we have undertaken an HST photometric survey of 13 star clusters in the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) with masses comparable to that of old GCs where MPs have been identified, but with significantly younger ages (from 1.5 - 11 Gyr). We found that the extent of the MPs (in both chemical spread and in the number of stars that show the chemical anomaly) are a strong function of age, with older clusters having more extreme populations. Another surprising result is that we find MPs down to ~2 Gyr old clusters for the first time. This is fundamental as it shows that the formation of MPs is not restricted only to the early Universe, but it continued down to a redshift of at least z=0.17.  This provides another strong link between young massive clusters and the ancient globular clusters, suggesting a common formation/evolution mechanism.  The results presented here represent fundamental constraints for the origin of MPs and might point towards a new and fresh direction into the onset of this complex phenomenon.

11/04/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Quasar-driven winds in galaxy formation
Nadia Zakamska (Johns Hopkins University)
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Abstract

Quasars are now thought to have made critical impact on galaxy formation. Feedback from accretion onto supermassive black holes is frequently implicated in establishing the black hole mass vs galaxy bulge correlations and in limiting the maximal mass of galaxies. In this talk, I will review the indirect evidence for quasar feedback as required by galaxy formation models. I will then review the recent progress on detecting direct evidence for quasar-driven outflows and other types of feedback through multi-wavelength observations. These data may provide direct observational evidence for one of the long-standing paradigms in galaxy formation.

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11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — Predictions of the Pseudo-Complex Theory of Gravity for EHT Observations: Observational Tests
Thomas Boller (MPE)
10/04/19 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — How much does the Milky Weigh?
Laura Watkins (ESO)

Abstract

The mass of the Milky Way is one of its most fundamental properties, important for understanding the MW itself, the past and future of the Local Group of galaxies, and where the MW sits in a cosmological context. Yet mass estimates in the literature are significantly scattered and many estimates differ by more than their uncertainties. Mass estimates rely on accurately measuring total velocities of objects within the MW, but historically we have only been able to measure one component of motion, leaving two components unknown. However, this has changed thanks to recent proper motion measurements from HST and Gaia. I will talk about why knowing the mass of the MW is so important, how we can measure it, why there has been such disagreement in the past, and how recent HST and Gaia measurements are finally bringing better agreement.

09/04/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Precision at the LHC: why and how
Giulia Zanderighi (MPP)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Using sub-millimeter surveys to look for proto-brown dwarf candidates
Oscar Morata (currently ESO visitor)

Abstract

Brown dwarfs (BDs) bridge the mass range between low-mass stars and Jupiter-like planets. BDs are relatively abundant in star forming regions and in the field, but their formation mechanism is still under debate.  Some theoretical descriptions and observational findings support the idea that stars and BDs share a common formation history, but the observational evidence is still not enough to distinguish the competing formation models. The study of the earliest phases of BD formation, the proto-BD phase, when they are still embedded in the parental cloud, and finding BDs formed in isolation with similar properties to low-mass stars would strongly support the star-like scenario as the primary formation mechanism. Our group started more than ten years a project to search and characterize very young proto-BD through a systematic and multi-wavelength exploration in nearby star-forming regions. I will show some of the results of the collaboration that has found a few tens of candidate proto-BDs in Taurus, Barnard 30, and Chamaeleon II, which begin to point out to the formation of BDs as a scaled-down version of low-mass stars.

08/04/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Characterizing the circum/inter-galactic medium in emission around z~3 quasars
Fabrizio Arrigoni Battaia (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Explosive Nucleosynthesis in Core Collapse Supernovae
Marco Limongi (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma)

Abstract

Core Collapse Supernovae are the endpoint of the evolution of massive stars (M > 10 Msun). They play a fundamental role in the evolution of the Universe because, among the other things, contribute to the production of most of the elements (especially those necessary to life), induce star formation when the shock wave following the explosion passes though the interstellar medium, produce neutron stars and black holes, are connected to the GRB events (some of them) and last, but not least, are one of the sources of gravitational waves. Therefore, a good knowledge of these events are needed to shed light on many astrophysical topical subjects.

In this lecture I will mainly focus on the role of core collapse supernovae in then chemical evolution of the matter and, in particular, on the nucleosynthesis occurring during the explosion. I will describe the basic principles of the nuclear burning at high temperatures coupled to the dynamics of the exploding mantle of the star and will show the main products of the various explosive burning.

For sake of completeness I will also briefly discuss the chemical composition of the final ejecta, how it depends on the progenitor star and on the remnant mass. Finally, I will show which is the contribution of a generation of massive stars (i.e., core collapse supernovae) to the global enrichment of the interstellar medium.

04/04/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Neutral and molecular gas outflows as tracers of the impact of radio jets
Raffaella Morganti (ASTRON, the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy & Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen)
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Abstract

Our view of the gas and its physical conditions in the central region of AGN has been enriched by the discover of fast and massive outflows of HI and molecular gas. These outflows can be driven by radiation/winds but also by the interaction of the radio plasma with the ISM. Understanding the origin and quantifying their impact requires to trace their location and derive their physical conditions (density of the gas, mass, mass outflow rate and kinetic energy of the outflow etc.). Particularly interesting has been the finding that in the first phase of their life, jet in radio galaxies can be particularly effective in driving such outflows. This crucial phase is at the heart of the idea of feedback, therefore particularly relevant for studying feedback in action.

In this talk, I will present some of the results we have obtained to trace jet-driven HI and molecular gas outflows down to scales ranging from hundred to tens of pc. The impact of low-power radio jets will be discussed and the comparison with the predictions from numerical simulations will also be presented. Outflows of up to 100 Msun/yr have been found in molecular gas using ALMA while the HI observed with VLBI is showing that the outflowing gas is clumpy as also predicted from numerical simulations. I will describe the kinematics of the gas and its conditions and the relevance they may have for feedback.

 

Video

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11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Splitting growth and geometry to test LCDM with the Dark Energy Survey
Jessie Muir (Stanford Univ.)
03/04/19 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Signatures of multi-phase AGN-driven outflows in optical spectra
Michele Perna (INAF, Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri)

Abstract

Numerous models of galaxy evolution expect that AGN should have a negative feedback effect on star formation in their host galaxy, by injecting energy into the ISM in the form of powerful outflows. In this informal discussion, I will focus on observational evidence of multi-phase outflows in optical spectra of nearby AGN. In particular, I will show which are the best tracers of ionised and atomic outflows among emission and absorption lines commonly observed in optical spectra. Then, I will talk about general outflow properties and their connection with AGN activity. In the last part, I will discuss gas mass outflow rate and related energetics, generally used to estimate the feedback impact on galaxy evolution.

02/04/19 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The Age Distribution of the Milky Way's halo: A Storyteller of Galaxy Formation
Daniela Carollo (INAF, L' Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino)

Abstract

The halo system of the Milky Way is a precious laboratory because it provides unique elemental abundances and kinematic information on the first objects formed in the Universe and encoded in the ancient stars that populate this complex structure. All this information can be used to tightly constrain models of galaxy formation and evolution. In this talk, I will focus on the age distribution and age gradients in the halo system and I will discuss possible formation scenarios of the Galaxy based on these results.

10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — (topic to be announced)
Gaitee Hussein (ESO)
01/04/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Neutron star merger modelling in the era of multimessenger astronomy
Ricard Ardevol (MPA)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Talk
Talk — Galaxy assembly, outflows and the evolution of disks with IllustrisTNG
Annalisa Pillepich (MPIA Heidelberg)

March 2019

29/03/19 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — 2D Deconvolution with Adaptive Kernel
Dirk Nille (MPI für Plasmaphysik)

Abstract

Adaptive Kernel proved to be valuable in the evaluation of 1D profiles of positive additive distributions in inverse problems. This includes modelling photon fluxes as well as heat fluxes from plasma to the surrounding wall in fusion research. This multi-resolution concept is extended to 2D evaluation, aiming at inverse problems arising in the analysis of image data. Approaches for tackling the problem with optimisation routines as well as "classic" Random Walk and Hamiltonian Monte Carlo integration are presented.

14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — New Light on Standard Candles: Cepheids as sensitive stellar laboratories and accurate cosmic yardsticks
Richard I. Anderson (ESO)

Abstract

This talk presents the crucial role that type-I Cepheid variable stars play in improving the understanding of how stars and the cosmos evolve. Starting from the recently reported Hubble constant tension that may imply a need for new physics beyond standard cosmology, I will describe ongoing efforts to measure H0 with an accuracy of 1%. Specifically, I will present an ongoing large observing program operating on both hemispheres that has measured more than 19,000 high-precision radial velocities of Cepheids in support of accurate parallaxes and alternative distance estimates based on Baade-Wesselink-type methods. After highlighting the impact of binaries for accurate parallax determination, I will show that stars physically associated with Cepheids contribute a modest photometric bias of less than 0.23% to H0, which may be further reduced in the future. The second part of the talk discusses Cepheids as sensitive stellar laboratories that probe the effects of rotation on stellar evolution in general and in the context of predicting properties of Cepheid populations, such as the period-luminosity-relation. Time permitting, I will present the curious case of Polaris, our nearest Cepheid, whose Gaia-based luminosity estimate and multi-periodic variability seem to defy theory, thus underlining the urgent need for a more detailed astrophysical understanding of our most important standard candles.

28/03/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Solar interior, helioseismology and neutrinos
Aldo Serenelli (CSIC, Barcelona)
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Abstract

For more than 20 years helioseismology, the study of solar oscillations, has provided an exquisite picture of the solar interior structure. However these oscillations, which are standing acoustic waves in the solar interior, have diminishing amplitudes towards the deep interior and render a blurred picture of the solar innermost core, where most nuclear reactions take place and neutrinos are produced. During the last decade, after the discovery of neutrino oscillations, solar neutrino experiments such as SuperKamiokande, SNO and especially Borexino have continued to develop and improve the accuracy and precision of measurements solar neutrino fluxes. Helioseismic and neutrino constraints offer complementary views of solar interiors and open up the best possibilities to date for testing solar (and stellar) evolution theory as well as a laboratory for particle physics.

The talk will first review the current status of (standard) solar modeling in the context of helioseismic constraints, and discuss where problems and uncertainties lie. About the latter, some emphasis will be placed on recent calculations and experiments of radiative opacities that impact solar and stellar modeling. The second part of the talk will present results of solar neutrino experiments, focusing on Borexino's capabilities to perform solar neutrino spectroscopy, and the constraints on solar interior models that can be obtained. The third part of the talk will briefly discuss the relevance of solar model uncertainties for evolution of low mass stars and the uncertainties in determination of stellar properties based on asteroseismic results might be affected. A short final part will include a discussion of the recent claims of detection of gravity modes (g-modes) in solar oscillations.

Video

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14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Seminar
Talk — Probabilistic Linear Solvers - Treating Approximation as Inference
Simon Bartels (MPI Tuebingen)
27/03/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — 3D Radiation MHD Simulations of Gas and Dust in Protoplanetary Disks
Mario Flock (MPIA Heidelberg)
26/03/19 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Exploring the dimming event of RW Aur A through multi-epoch VLT/X-Shooter spectroscopy
Maria Koutoulaki (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies)

Abstract

The study of the inner gaseous disc of YSOs is crucial to understand the physical processes ruling disc evolution and its connection with planet formation. In this talk, I will present our results on the inner disc properties of the CTTS RW AurA. The RW Aur system has captured the attention of astronomers for its dimming events. By using X-SHOOTER spectra obtained when the star was in a bright and in a dim state, we compare the NIR CO emission in order to shed light on this mystery. In general, the NIR CO emission traces a warm (T=2000-5000K) and dense (NCO>1e12cm-2) gas as expected in the innermost region of discs. Both states need a cool (T=2600K) and dense (NCO=7e20cm-2) gas to reproduce the observations, with the emitting region located just inside the dust sublimation radius. By comparing the SED (from ~300 to ~1000 nm) and the CO emission of both states, we find that the dimming can be due to absorption by a layer of large grains with optical depth slowly declining from 2.8 to 1.6. The accretion rate remains constant (Macc~2e-8 Mo/yr) if one assumes that the same layer of dust also occults the accretion line emitting region. This excludes accretion bursts as the main cause of RW AurA brightness variability.

25/03/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Lensed galaxies: a unique opportunity to study the kinematics at high redshift
Francesca Rizzo (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — AGN feedback
Chris Harrison (ESO)

Abstract

Supermassive black holes are found inside all massive galaxies. As these black holes grow (through mass accretion) tremendous amounts of energy is released. Current galaxy evolution theory states that this energy must couple to the gas in the host galaxy (and beyond) and consequently heat the gas or driving it away through outflows. Without this so-called “AGN feedback” models cannot reproduce realistic galaxy populations. However, trying to observationally constrain this process has been an on-going challenge for the last two decades. In this KES I will give a simplified overview of the status of the research on AGN feedback, including the different approaches taken by observers and theorists. Most importantly I will try to provide some clarity on what can be considered a very confusing topic to those outside the field!

22/03/19 (Friday)
10:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
HEG Seminar
Talk — The problematic connection between gamma-ray bursts and ultra-high energy cosmic rays
Filip Samuelsson (KTH Stockholm)
21/03/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The conditions and impact of star formation in a multi-phase interstellar medium
Stefanie Walch (University of Cologne)
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Abstract

Star formation takes place in the densest and coldest parts of the interstellar medium (ISM), in dark molecular clouds. These are swept up by multiple supernova explosions on scales of several hundred parsec. While condensing out of the warm ISM, the clouds are continuously fed with fresh gas. Thus, the turbulent substructure and magnetic field properties are imprinted during cloud formation. The formation of dense clouds from the multi-phase ISM, the onset of star formation, and the evolution of the molecular clouds under the impact of stellar feedback from newly born massive stars is studied in high-resolution simulations within the SILCC project. In this talk I will give an overview of the physics and chemistry involved in molecular cloud formation and evolution. After the onset of star formation, the latter is governed by stellar feedback from newly born massive stars. The detailed cloud substructure determines the clouds' vulnerability to stellar feedback processes, in particular to ionizing radiation. Moreover, the ionization state of the gas can be highly variable on scales of tens of parsec due to small-scale turbulent motions within the star-forming clouds, which shield and release the ionizing radiation. This leads to a flickering of the young HII regions on the scale of ~10 pc. On scales of several 100 pc and time scales of tens of Mega-years, the combined feedback from star clusters leads to a reduced star formation rate, such that long depletion time scales are observed.

Video

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11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
ORIGINS Cluster Lecture
Talk — Hunting for the Birthplaces of Supermassive Black Holes in Terabytes of Simulation Data
Michael Norman (Univ. of California)
20/03/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Accretion and Feedback in the Formation of Massive Stars
Rolf Kuiper (University of Tübingen)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — How to (not) find proto-brown dwarfs and why do we care
Oscar Morata (currently ESO visitor)

Abstract

Brown dwarfs populate the lower end of the IMF, and bridge the mass space between low-mass stars and planets. Due to their low mass, there is a strong debate about their formation mechanism(s). In order to confirm or discard those, we need to detect, and characterize, the different stages of brown dwarf evolution, which is no easy task. Ww have followed a systematic approach to the subject in our collaboration, from which we can extract some general lessons, and advice. Nonetheless, interesting and puzzling questions and challenges still remain and it is worth to keep them in mind. 

 

19/03/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The H.E.S.S. view on the Very High Energy Universe
Mathieu De Naurois (Ecole Polytechnique)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Accretion and Feedback in High-Mass Star Formation
Rolf Kuiper (University of Tübingen)

Abstract

In the course of their accretion phase, massive (proto)stars impact their natal environment in a variety of feedback effects such as thermal heating, MHD-driven protostellar jets and outflows, radiation forces, and photoionization / HII regions. Here, I present our most recent simulation results in terms of the relative strength of the feedback components and the size of the reservoir from which the forming stars gain their masses. For the first time, these simulations include all of the feedback effects mentioned above which allows us to shed light on the physical reason for the upper mass limit of present-day stars. Furthermore, we predict the fragmentation of massive circumstellar accretion disks as a viable road to the formation of spectroscopic massive binaries and the recently observed strong accretion bursts in high-mass star forming regions.

To advertise our latest code development, I will also overview the most recent results obtained in a variety of other astrophysical research fields from the formation of embedded Super-Earth planets’ first atmospheres (Cimerman et al. 2017, MNRAS) to the formation of the progenitors of the first supermassive black holes in the early universe (Hirano et al. 2017, Science).

 

11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — The Chirality of Primordial Gravitational Waves
Evan McDonough (Brown University)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
ORIGINS Cluster Visitor Talk
Talk — Exploring the Cosmic Dawn with Supercomputers: Progress and Remaining Challenges
Michael Norman (Univ. of California)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Revealing the Evolution of Comet Nuclei with Ground Photometric Observations
Rosita Kokotanekova (ESO)

Abstract

The complex nature of comets has earned them a spot among the most interesting objects in the Solar System. Comets are believed to still preserve information about the physical conditions in the protoplanetary disc. At the same time they also bear signatures of the epoch of planetary migration ~4 billion years ago, of the time spent in the outer solar system, as well as of their recent activity.

In the past three decades, a great progress in untangling the intricate history of comets has come from the in-situ studies during a series of space missions which culminated with the Rosetta mission between 2014 and 2016. However, with no plans for space missions to further comets in the next couple of decades, we have to rely more on telescope observations to reveal new details about the unanswered questions in cometary science.

In this talk, I will present results from our effort to study Jupiter-family comet nuclei and their source populations in the Centaur region and the Kuiper Belt. This work has demonstrated that ground photometric observations of the rotation and surface properties of comet nuclei can be key for understanding their evolution.

 

18/03/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Quasar and stellar radiative feedback in high-z, massive galaxies
Tiago Costa (MPA)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — A Unified Model of the Emission, Extinction, and Polarization of Interstellar Dust
Brandon Hensley (Princeton Univ.) (Princeton University)
15/03/19 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Luminous Blue Variable stars: mass-loss history and dust production
Claudia Agliozzo (ESO)

Abstract

Massive star evolution is ruled by mass-loss. Through their stellar-winds, massive stars inject mechanical energy and radiation into their surroundings, influencing star formation and galaxy evolution. The generally accepted scenario foresees that very massive stars become Blue Supergiants, enter an instability phase during which they rapidly lose their H envelope through severe mass-loss, and form Wolf-Rayet stars. In this scenario, the unstable Luminous Blue Variable stars (LBVs) have a key role. Observations suggest that LBVs undergo short-duration eruptions, during which they release to the ISM a large fraction of their H-envelope with very high mass-loss rates. Among the many open issues, the mechanism that provokes the LBV instability and violent episodes of mass-loss is not clear, but it has been proposed that it is independent of metallicity, increasing the importance of LBVs in the early Universe. The physical conditions in their ejecta during the giant eruptions seem favourable for the formation and growth of dust. For these reasons LBVs are also candidate producers of dust in the early Universe. However, until recently little has been known about LBV nebulae in low metallicity environments. We carried out a pilot study of LBVs in the Magellanic Clouds with ALMA, VISIR and ATCA, focusing particularly on the mass-loss history and the dust content. I will show some results from our multiwavelength study, compare with Galactic objects, and discuss future perspectives offered by ALMA and the latest generations of instrumentation.

14/03/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE)
Martin C. Weisskopf (NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center)
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Abstract

It has been over 44 years since the last extra-solar X-ray polarization observation was performed. As part of the NASA’s Small Explorer Program a new, exciting mission, will, for the first time, produce image-resolved polarimetry of astronomical sources. I am the Principal Investigator of this mission which includes a significant collaboration with the Italian Space Agency. I shall review the history of astrophysical X-ray polarimetry, discussing various experimental techniques and emphasizing the successful method of tracking the photoelectron in a low-Z gas developed in Italy that has allowed this experiment to proceed. After a discussion of the Observatory and its components, I shall present examples of the scientific advances that can be made by adding imaging polarimetry to the X-ray astronomer’s arsenal of tools for probing diverse questions such as: Was the black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy one million times more active a few hundred years ago? What is the spin the black holes in microquasars? Is there direct evidence for the effects of quantum electrodynamics in the strong magnetic fields in magnetars?

Video

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11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — The molecular gas content of z~2 active galactic nuclei
Chiara Circosta (ESO)
13/03/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — What Comets Can Tell us About Planetesimal Formation
Juergen Blum (TU Braunschweig)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — The last major feeding, star formation and feedback episode of Sgr A*
Sergei Nayakshin (Univ. of Leicester)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Polarization of light and polarimetry with FORS2
Ana Mourão (CENTRA, IST, ULisboa)

Abstract

Magnitude, color, spectrum, and coordinates of light sources are the main parameters measured in most of the astronomical observations. However, the incoming light might show some degree of polarization. Polarimetric measurements allow to unveil important properties of the source and of the light path, otherwise hidden in common observations. We will discuss some aspects of polarization of light and its measurement with the Focal Reducer/low dispersion Spectrograph, FORS2, mounted on the VLT. In 2019 ESO is celebrating the 20th Anniversary of first light for FORS2.

12/03/19 (Tuesday)
14:00, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — ALMA challenges to planet accretion theories
Sergei Nayakshin (University of Leicester)

Abstract

High resolution ALMA observations recently provided strong hints for the presence of giant planets in the annular structures in young protoplanetary discs with separations up to 100 AU. I point out that these observations set unique "live" constraints on the process of gas accretion onto sub-Jovian planets that were not previously available. Using a population synthesis approach we compare the properties of the synthetic planets with the ALMA data at the same age. Applying the widely used gas accretion formulae leads to a deficit of sub-Jovian planets and an over-abundance of a few Jupiter mass planets compared to observations. We find that gas accretion onto planets needs to be suppressed by about an order of magnitude to match the observed planet mass function. This slower gas giant growth predicts that the planet mass should correlate with the age of the protoplanetary disc, albeit with a large scatter. This effect is not clearly present in the ALMA data. I show that the suspected ALMA planets are far more likely to form via gravitational fragmentation of massive protoplanetary discs followed by a partial mass loss. Detailed 3D simulations exemplifying this mode of planet formation will be presented.

12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Mass-loss from evolved stars: recent advances and future prospects from surveys to statistics
Peter Scicluna (ASIAA)

Abstract

Outflows of evolved stars drive the chemical evolution of galaxies in the local Universe. Population models dictate that low- to intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars dominate this process today, while in the early universe, massive stars and supernovae were likely the main contributors. However, many key issues regarding AGB mass loss remain unresolved. Thanks to Spitzer, a number of Local Group galaxies have been observed in detail, revealing the dust-production rates of all evolved stars, and hence the total dust injection rate for the galaxies. However, measuring the gas mass-loss rates outside our galaxy is prohibitive, making it unlikely that a large sample will be available in the foreseeable future, and systematic studies in the Milky Way remain conspicuously absent. The Nearby Evolved Stars Survey (NESS) aims to fill this gap, by targeting a volume-limited sample of roughly 400 sources within 2 kpc, enabling robust statistical studies of local evolved stars. We will derive the dust and gas return rates in the Solar Neighbourhood, and constrain the physics underlying these processes. I will present a detailed description of the project, including the motivation and strategy, and highlight some of our early results. I will also briefly introduce the tools we are developing that will, along with a catalogue containing all raw and reduced NESS data and a compilation of literature data, be released to the community to aid reproducibility.

09:15, ESO Supernova | ESO Garching
FORS 20th Anniversary
11/03/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Unveiling the sources of Reionization using the Lyman-alpha transition: a numerical approach
Enrico Garaldi (MPA)
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — Hunting for gamma-ray pulsars with multi-wavelength observations
Kwan Lok Li (UNIST)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — The role of Interstellar dust on the formation of Complex Organic Molecules
Ankan Das (ICSP, Kolkata, India)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Gaia's impact and potential for pulsating stars and the distance scale
Richard I. Anderson (ESO)

Abstract

The ESA cornerstone mission Gaia has been relentlessly scanning the full sky for nearly 5 years in order to create an unprecedented three-dimensional map of the Milky Way based on astrometric, photometric, and spectroscopic observations of more than 1.7 billion stars. The two first Gaia data releases (DR1, DR2) have already significantly impacted many areas of astronomy and astrophysics. Yet, the best is still to come with Gaia's mission lifetime having been extended to 6.5 years, and further extensions being likely. However, 10 months after DR2, several issues related to Gaia data have surfaced and are worth discussing.

This KES lecture aims to provide a digestible teaser of Gaia's enormous potential for stellar astrophysics and cosmology while addressing some lessons learned since DR2. To this end, the lecture is split into three main parts: i) a brief overview of the Gaia mission as the largest-ever homogeneous all-sky multi-instrument time-domain survey, ii) Gaia's variability processing with a focus on classical Cepheids and other pulsating stars, and iii) Gaia's impact on the distance scale and its relevance for resolving the Hubble tension. 

07/03/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae: kinematic tracers in and around galaxies
Magda Arnaboldi (ESO)

Abstract

Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae (Pne) were mostly studied as secondary distance indicators in late and early-type galaxies, because of the cut-off of their luminosity function at bright magnitudes. With the use of 8 meter and custom built instruments of 4 meter telescopes, they become excellent spatial and kinematic tracers of their parent stellar populations.  In this talk, I will begin with the latest results on the kinematics within galaxies and give examples for the maximal  disk in NGC 628 and multiple disk components in M31. I will then move to the results from the extended Planetary Nebulae Spectrograph (e.PN.S) survey of a sample of local elliptical galaxies (ETGs). While ETGs are either fast and slow rotators at 1 R_e, their stellar halos traced by Pne show an increased  kinematical diversity. By using extended velocity fields out to 5.6 R_e on average, evidence is found for a kinematic transition between inner regions and halos, which depends on the stellar mass and correlates with the spatial transition from the ``in-situ'' to the ``ex-situ'' components  from cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.  I will then present the results based on the kinematics of the halos using Pne for the high mass end of the galaxy population: the cD galaxies in groups and clusters. I will describe how their stellar halos fade into the intra-group/intracluster light and the current measurements of their orbital anisotropy at 50-100 kpc. I will conclude with the constraints on the satellite progenitors of the stars in the outermost regions of these halos/ICL and with a forward look for the use of the ELT.

06/03/19 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — High mass white dwarfs as progenitors for double-detonation supernovae Ia
Thomas Kupfer (University of California at Santa Barbara)

Abstract

A recently proposed SN Ia channel is via the so-called sub-Chandrasekhar double-detonation scenario. In this scenario a white dwarf (WD) is orbited by a core Helium(He)-burning compact hot subdwarf star (sdB/sdO) in an ultra-compact orbit (Porb < 80 min). Due to the emission of gravitational waves, the binary is predicted to shrink until the hot subdwarf star fills its Roche lobe and starts mass transfer. He-rich material is then transferred to the C/O-WD companion which will lead to the accumulation of a He-layer on top of the WD. After accreting a small amount He-burning is predicted to be ignited in this shell. This in turn triggers the ignition of carbon in the core even if the WD-mass is significantly lower than the Chandrasekhar limit. However, the number of known systems is still limited. The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) is a new time-domain survey with a 47 sqd. survey camera. I am scientific lead of a high-cadence survey in the Galactic Plane covering the full inner Plane visible from the northern hemisphere as part of ZTF. The goal of this survey is to uncover the population of short period variable stars in the Galaxy. In this talk I will present the discovery of several ultracompact white dwarf binaries with hot subdwarf companions as well as our strategy to find more systems using ZTF.

05/03/19 (Tuesday)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Circumstellar Dust Distribution in Systems with Two Planets in Resonance
Giovanni Picogna (USM)

Abstract

We investigate via numerical modeling the effects of two planets locked in resonance, and migrating outward, on the dust distribution of the natal circumstellar disk. We test whether the dust distribution exhibits peculiar features arising from the interplay among the gravitational perturbations of the planets in resonance, the evolution of the gas, and its influence on the dust grain dynamics. Models show that a common gap also forms in the dust component similarly to what a single, more massive planet would generate and that outward migration leads to a progressive widening of the dust gap and to a decoupling from the gas gap. As the system evolves, a significantly wider gap is observed in the dust distribution, which ceases to overlap with the gas gap in the inner disk regions.

01/03/19 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Tomography of evolved star atmospheres
Kateryna Kravchenko (ESO)

Abstract

Cool giant and supergiant stars are among the largest and most luminous stars in the Universe and, therefore, dominate the integrated light of their host galaxies. These stars were extensively studied during last few decades, however their relevant properties like photometric variability and mass loss are still poorly constrained. Understanding of these properties is crucial in the context of a broad range of astrophysical questions including chemical enrichment of the Universe, supernova progenitors, and the extragalactic distance scale.

Atmospheres of giant and supergiant stars are characterized by complex dynamics due to different interacting processes, such as convection, pulsation, formation of molecules and dust, and the development of mass loss. Dynamical processes in stellar atmospheres impact the formation of spectral lines producing their asymmetries and Doppler shifts. Thus, by studying the line-prole variations on spatial and temporal scales it is possible to reconstruct atmospheric motions in evolved stars. As will be shown in this thesis, a tomographic method is an ideal technique for this purpose. It is applied to pulsating Mira-type stars and RSG stars in order to better characterize their atmospheres and better understand respective mechanisms responsible for their photometric variability and mass loss.

February 2019

28/02/19 (Thursday)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Inflows and Outflows from Low Mass Protostars
Diego Mardones (MPE)
27/02/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Interstellar Chemistry of Simple Molecules in Gas and Ice
Miwa Goto (LMU)
26/02/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — AI at the LHC
Markus Stoye (Imperial College London)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Stellar chemo-kinematics of isolated dwarf galaxies
Salvatore Taibi (Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias)

Abstract

The study of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph) is of great importance to understand galaxy evolution at the low-mass end. In the Local Group (LG) the majority of them are found to be satellites of the Milky Way or M31. Although the closest ones have been studied in great detail, it is hard to constrain if their present-day observed properties are mainly caused by internal or environmental mechanisms.

To minimize environmental effects and gain an insight into their intrinsic properties, we are studying two isolated dSph galaxies in the LG, i.e. Cetus and Tucana, located far beyond the virial radius of the Milky Way and M31. These isolated dSphs, are also interesting because they break the morphology-density relation in the LG.

In this talk I will present results from a sizable spectroscopic sample of individual red giant branch stars taken with the VLT/FORS2 instrument in Cetus and Tucana dSphs. The spectra cover the near-IR CaII triplet wavelength region, from which we have obtained line-of-sight velocities and metallicities ([Fe/H]). The wide-area coverage of our data allowed us to obtain information on the large-scale kinematical and chemical properties of the considered galaxies, such as the possible presence of rotation, metallicity gradients, and multiple chemo-kinematic components. Results on the Cetus and Tucana dSphs place more stringent constraints on the formation mechanisms that led to their present-day morphology.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Probing cosmology with Dark Matter Halo Sparsity from Galaxy Cluster Observations
Pier Stefano Corasaniti (LUTH, Obs. of Paris)
25/02/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Quasar and stellar radiative feedback in high-z, massive galaxies
Tiago Costa (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — The Tully-Fisher Relation
Federico Lelli (ESO)

Abstract

The Tully-Fisher (TF) relation is one of the tightest scaling laws in extra-galactic Astronomy, linking the visible mass of a galaxy to its outer rotation velocity. I will start with a brief historical overview of the TF relation and its application as a distance indicator. I will then focus on the physics behind the TF relation and its implications for dark matter and cosmology. In particular, the small scatter of the TF relation and the lack of residual correlations with galaxy radius lead to a number of non-trivial fine-tuning problems for current models of galaxy formation.

21/02/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Why Circumgalactic Matter Matters for Galaxy Evolution
Jessica K. Werk (University of Washington)
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Abstract

The circumgalactic medium (CGM; non-ISM gas within a galaxy virial radius) regulates the gas flows that shape the evolutionary paths of galaxies. It likely contains most of the metals lost in galaxy winds and enough material to sustain star-formation for billions of years.  Owing to the vastly improved capabilities in space-based UV spectroscopy with the installation of HST/COS, observations and simulations of the CGM have emerged as the new frontier of galaxy evolution studies. In this talk, I will describe observational constraints we have placed on the origin and fate of this material by studying the gas kinematics, metallicity and ionization state of gas 10 - 200 kpc from galaxies’ stars. I will conclude by introducing several exciting new techniques for resolving the gaseous structures in the CGM, and by posing unanswered questions about the CGM that will be addressed with future survey data and hydrodynamic simulations in a cosmological context.

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20/02/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Shaping evolved star winds: new views with ALMA
Liz Humphreys (ESO)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Metals as tracers of galaxy evolution
Francesco Belfiore (ESO)

Abstract

The evolution of galaxies is largely shaped by the interplay between inflows, star formation and feedback processes. Heavy elements are key tracers of this cycle of baryons in and out of galaxies. In this talk I will use observations of nearby galaxies to explore the link between metal enrichment and their history of star formation. While this approach is typically employed in systems where individual stars can be resolved, I will discuss the challenges involved in measuring gas and stellar metallicities from integrated light. I will then explore what can be learnt from applying chemical evolution models to the overall galaxy population, as observed in large spectroscopic surveys.

19/02/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Neutrino Fingerprints of the High Energy Sky
Irene Tamborra (Niels Bohr Institute)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Towards a new paradigm of dust structure in AGN: Dissecting the mid-IR emission of Circinus galaxy
Marko Stalevski (Astronomical Observatory of Belgrade)

Abstract

Recent observations which resolved the mid-infrared (MIR) emission of nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN), revealed that their dust emission appears prominently extended in the polar direction, at odds with the expectations from the canonical dusty torus. This polar dust, tentatively associated with dusty winds driven by radiation pressure, is found to have a major contribution to the MIR flux from scales of a few to hundreds of parsecs. When facing a potential change of paradigm, case studies of objects with the best intrinsic resolution are essential. One such source with a clear detection of polar dust is a nearby, well-known AGN in the Circinus galaxy. Motivated by observations across a wide wavelength range and on different spatial scales, we proposed a phenomenological model consisting of a thin dusty disk and a large-scale polar outflow in the form of a hyperboloid shell. With detailed radiative transfer modeling, we demonstrated that such a model is able to explain the peculiar MIR morphology on large scales seen by VLT/VISIR and the interferometric data from VLTI/MIDI which probe the small scales. In contrast, while providing a good fit to the integrated MIR spectrum, the dusty torus model fails to reproduce the spatially resolved interferometric data. Our results call for caution when attributing dust emission of unresolved sources entirely to the torus and warrant further investigation of the MIR emission in the polar regions of AGN. We put forth the disc + wind model of Circinus as a prototype for the dust structure in the polar dust AGN population.

10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Interpreting the proto-planetary disks dust radii measured by ALMA surveys
Giovanni Rosotti (Leiden Observatory)
18/02/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Unravelling the formation history of the Milky Way with Galactic surveys and cosmological hydrodynamical simulations
Robert Grand (MPA)
14/02/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Chemical Characterization of Extrasolar Planets
Nikku Madhusudhan (Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge)
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Abstract

Exoplanetary discoveries in the past two decades have unveiled an astonishing diversity in the physical characteristics of exoplanetary systems, including their orbital properties, masses, radii, equilibrium temperatures, and stellar hosts. Exoplanets known today range from gas-giants to nearly Earth-size planets, and some even in the habitable zones of their host stars. Recent advances in exoplanet observations and theoretical methods are now leading to unprecedented constraints on the physicochemical properties of exoplanetary atmospheres, interiors, and their formation conditions.

I will discuss the latest developments and future prospects of this new era of exoplanetary characterization. In particular, I will present some of the latest constraints on atmospheric chemical compositions of exoplanets, made possible by state-of-the-art high-precision observations from space and ground, and their implications for atmospheric processes and formation conditions of exoplanets. The emerging framework for using atmospheric elemental abundance ratios for constraining +the origins and migration pathways of giant exoplanets will be discussed along with their implications for smaller rocky planets. A survey of theoretical and observational directions in the field will be presented along with several open questions on the horizon.

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11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — X-ray, SZ and dark matter in galaxy clusters
Stefano Ettori (INAF, Bologna)

Abstract

Galaxy clusters are dark-matter dominated systems enclosed in a volume that is a high-density microcosm of the rest of the universe. What is their true mass scale? What are the statistical properties of the represenatative population? How does their detectability depend on baryon physics? We have learnt a lot on these fundamental questions with our current projects, like XMM-Newton Cluster Outskirts Project (X-COP) and CLASH. More has to be understood and will be the focus of our next XMM-Newton Heritage Cluster Project that will pave the way in using the next generation of observatories, like XRISM eROSITA Euclid Athena, to construct a consistent picture of the formation and composition of galaxy clusters.

13/02/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Probing the protosolar disk using dust filtering of the gas giants in the early Solar System
Troels Haugbolle (Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen)
12:00, MPE room III X2 209 | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Methanol ice in L 1544
Miwa Goto (USM)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — The variable sky through different eyes
Liliana Sandoval Rivera (Texas Tech Univ.)
10:15, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Unconscious bias: what is it, what does it do and what we can do about it
Sara Lucatello (INAF, Padova)

Abstract

The unconscious brain processes are an important part of everyday life, but what effect do they have on our work, on the choices we make in the professions and our interplay with colleagues? I will present a few findings and discuss possible measures to adopt in order to make the workplace a fairer environment.

12/02/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Errors on Errors: Refining Statistical Analyses for Particle Physics
Glen Cowan (Royal Holloway, Univ. of London)
15:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Gender Forum
Talk — Genderismus. How 'gender' became a populist thing
Paula-Irene Villa (Chair of Sociology and Gender Studies Dept. LMU)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — From lunar eclipses to exoplanet atmosphere observations
Fei Yan (University of Göttingen)

Abstract

Transit spectroscopy is one of the main techniques for exoplanet atmosphere characterisation. Since a lunar eclipse has a similar geometry as exoplanet transit, it can be used to observe the Earth transiting the Sun. In this talk, I will present three lunar eclipses observations and three topics we learnt from these observations: Earth’s transmission spectrum, Rossiter-McLaughlin effect of the Earth transiting the Sun, stellar line’s center-to-limb variations during lunar eclipse. I will also present how we apply these knowledge to exoplanet atmosphere characterisations, especially the detection of sodium, hydrogen and helium in exoplanet atmospheres.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Evidence for Cosmic Hemispherical Asymmetry
Tarun Souradeep (IUCAA)
11/02/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Thermal instability and multiphase gas in the circumgalactic medium
Prateek Sharma (currently MPA)
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Talk
Talk — Why are there black holes at the centres of galaxies
Nadine Neumayer (MPIA, Heidelberg)
10:45, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — HORIZON: Beyond the Edge of the Visible Universe
Eiichiro Komatsu (MPA)

Abstract

In collaboration with a renowned movie director Hiromitsu Kohsaka, who is specialised on full-dome movies (which you would watch in a full-dome projection of the planetarium), we have created the world’s first full-dome movie on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In this 45-minutes movie, you will learn the history and physics of the CMB in an intuitive manner, with incredible computer graphics and beautiful original music. Actors and actresses are real people, but most of the other stuff are CGs.

While we cannot show this movie yet in the full-dome of ESO Supernova, I will show this on a flat screen. Enjoy! The trailer is available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQbZi4wfoaw

07/02/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The New Era of Stellar Physics
Matteo Cantiello (Flatiron Institute, New York)
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Abstract

Stellar astrophysics is undergoing a renaissance driven by new observational and theoretical capabilities. Wide-field time-domain surveys have uncovered new classes of stellar explosions, helping to understand how stars evolve and end their lives. Gravitational-wave astronomy is providing exciting insights in the properties of the final remnants of massive stars. Asteroseismology, the study of waves in stars, is also producing dramatic breakthroughs in stellar structure and evolution. Thanks to space astrometry, accurate distances are now available for an unprecedented number of galactic stars. From the theoretical standpoint, it is increasingly possible to study aspects of the three-dimensional structure of stars using targeted numerical simulations. These studies can then be used to develop more accurate models of these physics in one-dimensional stellar evolution codes.

I will review some of the most important results in stellar physics of the last few years, and highlight what are the most relevant puzzles that still need to be solved. I will put particular emphasis on the physics of massive stars, which are the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae, gamma-ray bursts and the massive compact remnants observed by LIGO.

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06/02/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Shaping an new model for low- and high-mass star-formation
Alvaro Hacar Gonzalez (Leiden Observ.)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Constraining the infalling envelope of embedded protostars: BHR71 and its hot corinos
Yao-Lun Yang (UT-Austin)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Gravitational time delays and the measurement of H_0
Sherry Suyu (MPA)

Abstract

Strong gravitational lenses with measured time delays between the multiple images can be used to determine the Hubble-Lemaître constant (H_0) that sets the expansion rate of the Universe. Measuring H_0 is crucial for inferring properties of dark energy, spatial curvature of the Universe and neutrino physics.  I will describe techniques for measuring H_0 from lensing with a realistic account of systematic uncertainties, and show the latest results from the H0LiCOW program.  I will show the bright prospects of gravitational lens time delays as an independent and competitive cosmological probe.

05/02/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — A pragmatic approach to formal fundamental physics
Daniel Friedan (Rutgers University)
04/02/19 (Monday)
17:15, HS2, Physik TUM Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Plasmonics - hot fields and hot electrons
Stefan Maier (LMU)
16:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — The growth of large-scale structure in the Universe, seen through X-ray vision
Aurora Simionescou (SRON)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Distance measurements with type II supernovae: II supernovae: from the expanding photosphere method to automated spectral fitting
Christian Vogl (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — MUSE reveals metal-enriched absorbers in the circum-galactic medium (CGM) of a radio galaxy at z=2.9
Sthabile Kolwa (ESO)

January 2019

31/01/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Stellar Population Models
Claudia Maraston (University of Portsmouth)

Abstract

Stellar population synthesis models describing the energetic emission and stellar mass distribution of galaxies and star clusters are the essential analysis tool in astrophysics and cosmology. They are used to determine the physics of stellar systems (formation ages, star formation history and chemical composition) and dark matter fractions from data, to predict the spectral energy distribution of simulated galaxies, to trace cosmic time for constraining cosmological parameters , to predict the number, mass and location of stellar remnants giving origin to gravitational waves. Given their widespread use and core role, the accuracy of population synthesis models needs to be constantly improved for keeping pace with progress in instrumentation.

In this talk I shall appraise the progress made over the past two decades focusing on the most significant leaps - the treatment of late stages of stellar evolution and the inclusion of detailed chemistry - which starting from Munich have stimulated substantial work around the globe. I shall then introduce the next step in population model calculations, which will leverage the exploitation of current and future data and hopefully provide the solution to some current puzzles, including the universality of the Initial Mass Function.

11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — The First Quasars and their surroundings... A tale from your favorite MUSE
Emanuele P. Farina (MPIA/MPA)
30/01/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Giant Planet Formation in the Pebble Accretion Scenario
Bertram Bitsch (MPIA)
12:15, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Formation of Interstellar Complex Organic Molecules (COMs): An ab initio Molecular Dynamics Study
Natalia Inostroza (Universidad Autonoma de Chile)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — Astrophysical Imaging with Information Field Theory
Julia Stadler (Durham University)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Recent advances in fitting heterogeneous datasets
Peter Scicluna (ASIAA)

Abstract

As astronomy advances, the biggest gains are often found by combining different kinds of data in a single analysis, e.g. combinations of photometry, spectroscopy, imaging etc. However, such combinations pose a number of statistical challenges that inhibit simple analyses and require new tools to solve them. A key challenge is self-consistently combining data with radically different statistical and systematic uncertainties. I will highlight some recent advances in forward-modelling astronomical data that dramatically improve this situation, before presenting a new tool to fit general combinations of observations.

29/01/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Probing the neutrino mass with calorimetric electron capture spectroscopy
Andrea Giachero (INFN of Milano-Bicocca)
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Elemental abundances and chemical enrichment in the hot intracluster medium
Francois Mernier (MTE-ELTE, Budapest)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Galactocentric variation of the gas-to-dust ratio and its relation with metallicity
Andrea Giannetti (Istituto di Radioastronomia, Bologna)

Abstract

The assumption of a gas-to-dust mass ratio is a common approach to estimate the basic properties of molecular clouds, from (sub)mm continuum observations of the dust. In the Milky Way a single value is used at all galactocentric radii, independently of the observed metallicity gradients. Both models and extragalactic observations suggest that this quantity increases for decreasing metallicity Z, typical of the outer regions in disks, where fewer heavy elements are available to form dust grains. We investigate the variation of the gas-to-dust ratio as a function of galactocentric radius and metallicity, to allow a more accurate characterisation of the quantity of molecular gas across the galactic disk, as derived from observations of the dust.

Observations of the optically thin C18O (2-1) transition were obtained with the APEX telescope for a sample of 23 bright star-forming regions in the far outer Galaxy (Rgc>14 kpc). From the modelling of this line and of the spectral energy distribution of the selected clumps we compute the gas-to-dust ratio and compare it to that of well-studied sources from the ATLASGAL TOP100 sample in the inner galactic disk. The gas-to-dust ratio is found to increase with galactocentric radius, whereas the dust metallicity decreases, the most common situation also for external late-type galaxies, suggesting that grain growth dominates over destruction. The predicted gas-to-dust ratio is in excellent agreement with the estimates in Magellanic clouds, for the appropriate value of Z.

11:00, MPE room III X2 209 | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — The environmental effect on galaxy evolution at z=2: high CO excitation, galaxy interactions, and the sub-M* population
Rosemary Coogan (Univ. of Sussex)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Radiative transfer through gas and dust
Martin Glatzle (MPA)
28/01/19 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Magnetic tweezers to study gene machines at the single-molecule level
David Dulin (FAU, Erlangen-Nuernberg)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The oxygen abundance of nearby galaxies from IFU data
Igor Zinchenko (currently at MPA)
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Gas phase Elemental abundances in Molecular cloudS (GEMS)
Asuncion Fuente (OAN, Madrid)
24/01/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Cosmic and other Bell Tests
Anton Zeilinger (Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information Austrian Academy of Sciences and University of Vienna)

Abstract

In experiments on Bell’s theorem the possibility is tested whether local realistic explanations of the correlations between entangled particles can explain the observed correlations. In the talk, I will first discuss possible loopholes in tests of Bell‘s Inequalities. I will then focus on the so-called freedom of choice loophole. This loophole is related to the demand that the measurements of correlations on two (or in principle more) entangled particles are free and independent. I will then in detail report on tests of Bell’s Inequality where cosmic sources are used to provide independent random input for the measurements t entangled photons. In the first experiment, stars within our Milky Way were used and in the second one, distant quasars. Another experiment has used choices of random numbers by humans. These numbers were directed to 13 experiments located globally at 12 different places. Finally, I will briefly mention the implementation of quantum cryptography between Europe and China using the Chinese quantum satellite Micius.

23/01/19 (Wednesday)
11:00, MPE Old Seminar Room 209 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Simulation of eROSITA Observations of Supernova Remnant Candidates
Gerson Rodrigues (HEG, MPE)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — ELT Instrumentation Q&A
Joël Vernet, Ralf Siebenmorgen, Vincenzo Mainieri, Suzanne Ramsay (ESO)

Abstract

As a sequel to the Q&A session on the ELT telescope, the Project Scientists of the ELT instruments will provide an opportunity to ask question on those facilities.

A short introduction to METIS, HARMONI, MICADO+MAORY, MOSAIC and HIRES instruments will be given. Thereafter, the floor will be open for questions.

22/01/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Asymptotic symmetries of gravity
Marc Henneaux (Univ. of Brussels)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Accurate imaging in radio interferometry: Optimal gridding and degridding
Haoyang Ye (University of Cambridge)

Abstract

The discussion on the choice and performance of different gridding functions can be dated back to 1960s by Liz Waldram in Radio Astronomy group at Cavendish. In radio interferometry imaging process, the Fourier transform relation between the visibility data and the sky brightness distribution is usually implemented by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), where a procedure called ‘gridding’ of convolving visibilities with a chosen gridding function is needed to assign visibility values into uniformly sampled grids. The spheroidal function has been widely used to suppress aliasing effects since early 1980s. We proposed "Least-misfit gridding function" under the criteria of minimising the difference between the DFT and FFT results. It is proved to have a better aliasing suppression performance than the spheroidal function on simulated dataset. It also minimises the DFT and FFT difference, outperforming the spheroidal function at least 10^2 times with the same gridding width and image cropping ratio. The least--misfit gridding function with a support width of 7 and an image cropping rate of 0.5 is recommended to be applied both into gridding and degridding process, so as to achieve the single precision in terms of the image misfit and visibility misfit respectively. Its application on our newly proposed wide-field imaging method can achieve the single and double precision with the gridding width equals to 7 and 14 respectively.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — How galaxies form stars: the connection between local and global star formation in galaxies
Vadim Semenov (Univ. Chicago)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Sub-arcsecond Resolution Observations of Class 0/I Protostars
Dominique Segura-Cox (MPE)

Abstract

Circumstellar disks are fundamental for accretion and angular momentum distribution during the early phases of star formation. Class 0 objects are the youngest protostars and most embedded in their natal envelopes, and circumstellar disks can form even at this earliest stage of star formation, yet the envelopes enshrouding Class 0 and Class I protostars have made detection of young protostellar disks difficult.  Our high-resolution work with the VLA and ALMA  towards some of the youngest protostars addresses a variety of questions regarding the frequency, dust properties, kinematics, and chemistry at the earliest times. 

21/01/19 (Monday)
17:15, HS2, Physik TUM Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Electronic structure and electron dynamics in two-dimensional materials
Philip Hofmann (Aarhus Univ.)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Joint image-visibility studies of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect
Luca di Mascolo (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — What can we learn about the interstellar medium of nearby (and high-z) galaxies using far-infrared lines?
Rodrigo Herrera-Camus (MPE)
17/01/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Forming Realistic Galaxies: Successes and Challenges
Alyson Brooks (Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey)

Abstract

Just a decade ago it was believed that one could not form realistic dwarf or disk galaxies in cosmological simulations.  The past decade has seen immense progress, through both advances in resolution and development of physically motivated feedback models. Different simulators are generally now capable of forming realistic galaxies that match a wide variety of observed galaxy scaling relations, despite variations in adopted star formation and feedback recipes.

I will discuss the reasons for these successes, but also highlight a couple of areas where simulators are still facing challenges, e.g., in reproducing realistic galaxy bulges.  I will also show that the assumptions simulators have adopted in the classical dwarf regime will lead to widely varying predictions for the properties of ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. Finally, I will highlight future observations that have the potential to tightly constrain the physical conditions required for star formation at the earliest times.

12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — New simulations and observations of highly- complex molecules in star-forming regions
Robin Garrod (Univ. of Virginia)
11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — Identification of AGN behind the Small Magellanic Cloud through the XMM-Newton survey
Chandreyee Maitra (MPE)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special MPA Colloquium
Talk — From Birth to Chirp - Astrophysics of Gravitational Wave progenitors
Selma de Mink (Univ. of Amsterdam)
16/01/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Probing Cosmology with the Dynamics of Voids
Nico Hamaus (LMU)
11:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special MPA Seminar
Talk — Thermal and non-thermal processes in star clusters: observational clues and numerical modeling
Siddharta Gupta (RRI, Bangalore)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special MPA Seminar
Talk — Simulating supermassive black hole formation and evolution
Melanie Habouzit (Flatiron Inst.)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Internal Kinematics of Globular Clusters with HST Proper Motions
Laura Watkins (ESO)

Abstract

Proper motions are crucial to fully understand the internal dynamics of globular clusters. To that end, the High-Resolution Space Telescope Proper Motion (HSTPROMO) collaboration has constructed large, high-quality proper-motion catalogues for 22 GCs in the Milky Way. For most clusters, these catalogues provide the most detailed kinematical data to date, with tremendous potential for improving our understanding of the dynamics and structure of individual clusters. Moreover, the size and diversity of the cluster sample, spanning a broad range of cluster properties (including environment and dynamical state), allows new studies of the GC populations as a whole. I will discuss some of our exciting recent results including: the first 2D kinematical maps for a large sample of GCs; the first directly-measured radial anisotropy profiles for a large sample of GCs; the first dynamical distance and mass-to-light ratio estimates for a large sample of GCs; and the first dynamically-determined masses for hundreds of blue-straggler stars across a large GC sample.

15/01/19 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Strong gravitational lensing as an observational probe of dark matter
Simona Vegetti (MPA)
11:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special MPA Seminar
Talk — Ab initio hydrodynamical simulations on galactic scales
Chia-Yu Hu (Flatiron Inst.)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special MPA Seminar
Talk — Detecting dark matter substructures using cold stellar streams
Nilanjan Banik (Univ. of Florida)
14/01/19 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Synthesis of 2-dimensional Materials for Applications in Electronics
Georg S. Duesberg (Uni Bundeswehr Muenchen)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The Cosmic Baryon Cycle
Celine Peroux (currently at MPA)
11:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special MPA Seminar
Talk — Accurate small-scale supermassive black hole dynamics in galactic-scale simulations
Antti Rantala (Univ. of Helsinki)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special MPA Seminar
Talk — Interaction of matter and high energy radiation: from compact objects to intergalactic medium
Ildar Khabibullin (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations: what they are and how to use them (hands-on with IllustrisTNG)
Dylan Nelson (MPA)

Abstract

I will give a short introduction to galaxy formation simulations, including their overall purpose, motivation, and utility for studying various questions within the context of galaxy formation and evolution. First, I will compare the different types, approaches, and computational methods. I will discuss the common physical ingredients -- which physical processes are typically included in current simulations, 'subgrid' models, and future directions in this front. With reference to Illustris and IllustrisTNG in particular, I will discuss model calibration (tuning), and typical 'caveats' to the use of these types of simulations.

In the second half, we will get practical and discuss the simulation outputs -- what kind of data exists, and how it can be used. I will go quickly through how to use the IllustrisTNG public data release (online), including its documentation, getting started tutorials, and examples for data analysis. We can discuss the creation of synthetic (mock) observations, how to compare the simulations to any type of observation that people may have, and other topics of interest.

11/01/19 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Jaynes's principle and statistical mechanics
Ulrich Schollwoeck (LMU Munich)
10:00, ESO New Cafeteria | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Proxima Centauri b and the detection of exoplanets hidden behind stellar noise
Fabio Del Sordo (Yale University)

Abstract

I will talk about the discovery and confirmation of Proxima b, the current efforts to investigate the presence of other planets orbiting around this star, and the characteristics of Proxima Centauri that act as noise and might hide the imprint of a further planets. I will also outline some of the current ideas to disentangle planetary signal from stellar noise for M Dwarfs and Solar-like stars.

10/01/19 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Raining on Galaxies and Black Holes: Unifying the Micro and Macro Properties of AGN Feeding and Feedback
Massimo Gaspari (Princeton University)

Abstract

Feeding and feedback tied to supermassive black holes (SMBHs) play central role in the cosmic evolution of galaxies, groups, and clusters of galaxies. The self-regulated active galactic nucleus (AGN) cycle is matter of intense debate. I review key results of our numerical campaign to unveil how SMBHs are tightly coupled to the multiphase gaseous halos, linking the inner gravitational radius to the large Mpc scale and vice versa. Massively parallel magnetohydrodynamic simulations show the turbulent plasma halo radiatively cools via a top-down multiphase condensation rain of warm filaments and molecular clouds. The multiphase precipitation inherits the hot halo kinematics and thermodynamics, ultimately establishing a 'cosmic weather'. In the nuclear region, the recurrent collisions between the clouds and filaments promote angular momentum cancellation and boost the SMBH accretion rate through a mechanism known as Chaotic Cold Accretion (CCA). The CCA rapid variability triggers powerful AGN outflows, which quench the macro cooling flow and star formation, while preserving the atmospheres of galaxies, groups, and clusters in global thermal equilibrium throughout cosmic time. I highlight the key imprints of AGN feedback and feeding, such as bubbles, shocks, turbulence, and condensed structures, with a critical eye toward observational concordance, including the X-ray plasma, optical filaments, and radio molecular clouds.

11:00, Room 313, MPP, Foehringer Ring 6, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — On Dark Matter Self Interactions, Viscosity and Cosmic Expansion
Abhishek Atreya (CAPSS, Bose Institute)
09/01/19 (Wednesday)
14:00, Room 313, MPP, Foehringer Ring 6, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — CMB constraints on light primordial black holes
Jan Hamann (UNSW Sydney)
08/01/19 (Tuesday)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies: Results from local and global simulations
Eva Ntormousi (FORTH, Uni Crete)
07/01/19 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Gamma-ray bursts from neutron star mergers
Andrei Beloborodov (Columbia Univ.)