Seminars and Colloquia at ESO Garching and on the campus

December 2018

20/12/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The production of dust in galaxies
Francisca Kemper (ESO)

Abstract

The evolution of interstellar dust reservoirs, and the evolution of galaxies themselves go hand-in-hand, as the presence of dust alters evolutionary drivers, such as the interstellar radiation field and the star formation history, while at the same time, the dust is being formed and altered by processes taking place in galaxies. Indeed, dust can often even be used as a tracer of physical conditions. The exact mineralogical composition, the size and the shape of dust grains, are all affected by the physical conditions. Due to the more permanent nature of solids, dust grains provide a historical record of its processing history, while interstellar gas will only ever probe the present conditions.

I will discuss our recent results on the Magellanic Clouds, Local Group galaxies, the Milky Way, AGN tori, and starburst galaxies, and highlight future observational opportunities open to astronomers to continue the study of interstellar dust in galaxies.

19/12/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Synergic Cosmology Across the Spectrum
Stefano Camera (University of Torino)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Constraining dark matter models with strong gravitational lensing
Giulia Despali (MPA)
18/12/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The Conformal Standard Model
Hermann Nicolai (MPI for Gravitational Phys.)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Flows of baryon in the CGM
Hadi Rahmani (GEPI, Paris Observatory)

Abstract

Circumgalactic medium (CGM), the interface between the interstellar medium and the intergalactic medium (IGM), is a complicated site of entwined gas from the IGM accretion and galactic outflows. QSO absorption line systems are unique tools to probe such gas phases that still remains undetected in emission. Combining the morpho-kinematics of the host galaxy absorber extracted from IFU observations and absorption lines kinematics lead us unraveling the nature of the CGM gas. Here, I present the results of our recent CGM studies using MUSE observations and discuss the possible scenarios for the origin of the gas seen in absorption.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — From the large scale structures to galactic scales: how does the cosmic web influence galaxy formation?
Corentin Cadiou (IAP, Paris)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — New Insights into the BOSS Small-Scale Lensing Discrepancy
Johannes Lange (Yale University)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Massive stars, integral field spectroscopy & serendipitous discoveries
Anna McLeod (University of California Berkeley, Texas Tech University)

Abstract

Massive stars strongly influence their immediate surroundings during their lifetimes (via e.g. protostellar jets, strong stellar winds, ionising radiation, supernovae). On larger scales, feedback from massive stars regulates the formation and evolution of entire stellar clusters and dominates the mass and energy cycle in star-forming galaxies like the Milky Way. Qualitatively, the effect of massive stars on their environment is well understood, but a solid quantitative, observational analysis is still missing. The results of recent feedback observations of a variety of structures and environments within (Galactic and extragalactic) massive star-forming regions will be shown, carried out with the integral field spectrographs MUSE and KMOS at the Very Large Telescope. I will discuss the advantages (and caveats) of integral field spectroscopy in tracing and quantifying feedback from massive stars, describe the bigger picture that connects feedback on small (cloud) scales to that on large (galactic) scales, and showcase two serendipitous discoveries

17/12/18 (Monday)
17:15, HS2, Physik TUM Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Ions and biomolecules in water - ultrafast motions and electric interactions
Thomas Elsaesser (Max-Born-Institut, Berlin)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Adaptive Optics for Astronomy
Sylvain Oberti (ESO)

Abstract

In this talk, I will introduce the motivations of adaptive optics for astronomy, the basic atmospheric physics and technical principle. Then, we will focus on the limitations of adaptive optics and possible remedies. Finally, I will briefly present the main adaptive optics modes offered at the VLT and in the future at the ELT, and their relevance for science. Real observation examples will be provided as illustration.

14/12/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — The properties of the Galactic population of cataclysmic variables from Gaia DR2
Anna Francesca Pala (ESO)

Abstract

Cataclysmic Variables (CVs) are close interacting binaries containing a white dwarf accreting from a low-mass star. CVs are the best type of systems to test our understanding of the evolution of compact, interacting binaries, as they are numerous, relatively bright, and both stellar components are structurally simple. Nonetheless, there are a number of discrepancies between current population CV models and observation that undermine our confidence in understanding the evolution and formation of more complex systems, such as black hole binaries, X-ray transients or SN Ia progenitors. The most striking disagreements are: (i) the predicted CV space density (de Kool 1992) is about 1-2 order of magnitude higher than observed  (e.g. Pretorius & Knigge 2012); (ii) the observed average mass of CV white dwarfs is significantly higher (~0.8 M_sun, Zorotovic et al. 2011) than predicted by the binary population synthesis models (<0.6 M_sun, Politano 1996).

Using the second data release from the ESA Gaia mission, we carry out the first population study of a volume-limited sample of CVs to accurately constrain their space density. In addition, by combining the distance to the systems with archival ultraviolet spectroscopy we are able to derive precise measurements of their white dwarf masses. I present here the results from this study which allow us to carry out a critical test for the current models of compact binary evolution.

13/12/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Detection of the Missing Baryons in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium
Fabrizio Nicastro (INAF, Rome)

Abstract

It has been known for decades that the observed number of baryons in the local Universe falls about 30-40% short of the total number of baryons predicted by Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis, inferred by density fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background and seen during the first 2-3 billion years of the universe (redshift z>2-3) in the so called “Lyman-α Forest". While theory provides a reasonable solution to this paradox, by locating the missing baryons in hot and tenuous filamentary gas connecting galaxies, it also sanctions the difficulty of detecting them because they’re by far largest constituent, hydrogen, is mostly ionized and therefore virtually invisible in ordinary signal-to-noise Far-Ultraviolet spectra. Indeed, despite the large observational efforts, only a few marginal claims of detection have been made so far.

Here I will first review the observational efforts pursued over the past 15 years by several groups and will then present our recent results that show that the missing baryons are indeed found in a tenuous warm-hot and moderately enriched medium that traces large concentrations of galaxies and permeates the space between and around them. I will show that the number of OVII systems detected down to the sensitivity threshold of our data, agrees well with numerical simulation predictions for the long-sought hot intergalactic medium, and its detection adds a fundamental tile to the long-standing missing baryon puzzle. Finally, I will comment on the implications of these new results for future high resolution X-ray missions (e.g. Athena).

14:00, TUM, James-Franck-Str., Garching | ESO Garching
TUM HEP Seminar
Talk — Searching for Dark Matter at the Cosmic Dawn
Julian Muñoz (Harvard)
11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — Quasar Radiation Pressure as a Driver of Galactic Outflows
Tiago Costa (MPA)
12/12/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Density Split Statistics – measuring and modelling higher order moments of the galaxy and matter density field
Oliver Friedrich (LMU)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Nobel Prizes 2018
Adam Rubin, Dominika Wylezalek, Francesco Belfiore, Remco van der Burg, Sthabile Kolwa, Alexandra Shelest (ESO)

Abstract

Join us for the traditional presentation of this year Nobel Prize laureates.

11/12/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — How Glasma evolves to Quark-Gluon Plasma: from turbulent attractor to perfect fluid
Raju Venugopalan (Brookhaven National Laboratory)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — How to tackle a giant Star: multi-wavelength studies of cool, evolved stars, using VLTI and HST
Gioia Rau (NASA/Goddard)

Abstract

The chemical enrichment of the Universe is considerably affected by the contributions of Giant stars. Giant and supergiant stars are surrounded by a hot layer called the chromosphere, which could likely powers Magneto-Hydrodynamic Alfven waves that drive their mass loss. Toward the end of their life, on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB), stars produce heavy chemical elements, molecules, and dust, which, through the mass loss provided via their stellar winds, are placed into the interstellar medium.

This talk will explore ongoing work modeling high-resolution spectroscopic observations with Hubble Space Telescope instruments (Rau et al. 2018, subm.), to reveal the role of the chromosphere in driving K-M giant and supergiant winds. Our results include estimates of wind and chromospheric parameters, mass-loss rates, and fundamental stellar parameters.

In addition, ground-based interferometric measurements with high-angular resolution instruments from VLTI, such as MIDI (Rau et al. 2015, Rau et al. 2017), GRAVITY (Wittkowski et al. 2018), help to test geometrical and dynamical models describing the behavior of the outer AGB atmospheres at various spatial scales. In this way we are able to unravel the role of molecules and dust in their extended atmospheres.Future plans include the use of high-angular resolution instruments such as VEGA at CHARA, and MATISSE at VLTI, to better understand the behavior of cool stars outer atmospheres at various spatial scales.

11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — (topic to be announced)
Satadru Bag (IUCAA)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Planetesimal formation during protoplanetary disk buildup
Joanna Drążkowska (TUM)

Abstract

Dust growth in protoplanetary disks is the first step towards planet formation. Models of dust growth are typically computed on a backdrop of fully formed class II protoplanetary disk model. However, studies of the mass budget of class II disks suggest that at this stage significant portion of solids must already be locked in larger objects, such as kilometre-sized planetesimals. I will present the results of my recent work concerning dust growth and planetesimal formation during protoplanetary disk buildup and its further evolution.

10/12/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Supercomputer insights into the messy physics of galaxy
Volker Springel (MPA)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — UBIK - a Universal Bayesian Imaging Toolkit
Jakob Knollmueller (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — On which scales are metals mixed?
Celine Peroux (Marseille/MPA)
07/12/18 (Friday)
10:30, IPP Lecture Hall D2 (IPP, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Edge localized modes and disruptions - Insights into large-scale plasma instabilities from non-linear magneto-hydrodynamic simulations
Matthias Hölzl (IPP Garching)

Abstract

Large-scale plasma instabilities with the potential of damaging wall structures or reducing their lifetime are a significant concern for magnetic confinement fusion. Among the most critical are disruptions and edge localized modes. Predicting the behavior of such instabilities and their control for ITER and beyond is a challenging task for which input from experiments, theory, and simulations is needed. This presentation describes non-linear MHD simulations of edge localized modes, disruptions and control strategies. The talk will explain why simulations or large-scale instabilities are needed and show that our simulations have already revealed a lot of aspects about the physics of large-scale instabilities. It will also give some insights into the actual work involved "behind the scenes" and challenges we are facing for the future.

06/12/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The IceCube blazar event and associated multimessenger data
Elisa Resconi (TUM)

Abstract

Cosmic particles at the highest energies travel to Earth from deep space. The questions about their origins and the nature of the acceleration mechanisms that power them to energies much higher than the one reached at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, have puzzled astronomers for over a century.

On July 12, 2018 the very first association of high energy neutrinos and electromagnetic waves coming from an extra-galactic source has been announced. The association of high energy neutrinos (in total more than 10) back to its origin has revealed the first source of high energy cosmic rays. The source is one of the brightest known blazar, an active galaxy powered by a super massive black hole and characterized by a strong jetted emission pointing towards us.

In this colloquium, the observation of the first source of high energy neutrinos will be reported together with the discussion about future prospective of the field.

05/12/18 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — 3D accretion disk hydrodynamics: theory and observations meet
Stefano Facchini (ESO)

Abstract

Accretion disks are usually modelled to be axisymmetric. However, whenever a misaligning torque is applied to the accretion disk, this can break in separate annuli, leading to a peculiar evolution. In the last two years, an unexpectedly large number of observations have revealed that this physical mechanism indeed occurs in astrophysical environments. Observational evidence range from quasi-periodic modulation of X-rays binaries, photometric dippers in young stellar object, and in particular high resolution images of protoplanetary disks. The misaligning torque can be different in nature, e.g. a binary system, a misaligned magnetic field, or a misaligned spin of the central black hole. In this discussion, I will show recent results on this topic in different astrophysical scenarios, and discuss the implications focusing in particular on the planet forming disks.

04/12/18 (Tuesday)
18:30, Center for Advanced Studies at LMU, Seestrasse 13, Munich | ESO Garching
LMU Talk
Talk — Exoplanets and the Search for Habitable Worlds
Sara Seager (MIT)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — COSINUS - cryogenic NaI detectors
Karoline Schaeffner (MPP)
16:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
CarSem Seminar
Talk — Spreading the news - public outreach at the MPI
Hannelore Haemmerle (MPA/MPE)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Observational probes of AGN interactions with their host galaxies
Natasha Maddox (LMU)

Abstract

Feedback from AGN is often invoked within galaxy formation models to restrict star formation and prevent simulated galaxies from becoming too large. However, directly observing this feedback has proven to be non-trivial, and indeed the sphere of influence of the AGN with respect to the host galaxy is not well understood. I present some recent observational work that connects activity within the AGN engine to observational signatures throughout the host galaxy, showing that the influence of nuclear activity can indeed extend beyond the central environment.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — An empirical approach to model emission lines of star-forming galaxies from the COSMOS2015 photometry catalog: towards a better design of forthcoming galaxy redshift surveys
Shun Saito (MPA)
03/12/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Search of strongly lensed transients via variability
Dani Chao (MPA)

November 2018

30/11/18 (Friday)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Turbulent cascades in magnetar flares and GRB jets
Andrei Beloborodov (Columbia Univ., MPA)
29/11/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Dynamics of protoplanetary disks: the role of magnetised winds
Geoffroy Lesur (University of Grenoble)

Abstract

The planet-forming region of protoplanetary disks is cold, dense, and therefore weakly ionised. For this reason, MHD turbulence is thought to be mostly absent, and another mechanism has to be found to explain gas accretion. It has been proposed that magnetised winds, launched from the ionised disk surface, could drive accretion in the presence of a large-scale magnetic field. The efficiency and the impact of these winds on the disk structure is still highly uncertain.

In this talk, I will review the most recent development in the modelling of these object, emphasising the role played by magnetised winds on accretion and the formation of large structures. I will show how these models could explain several observed features which cannot be explained by classical turbulent disc models.

28/11/18 (Wednesday)
14:30, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Colloquium
Talk — The birth of high angular resolution in Europe: VLTI and adaptive optics
Pierre Léna (Observatoire Paris-Site de Meudon)

Abstract

The current success of the VLT and VLTI in high angular resolution, the generalisation of adaptive optics result from a dream born in the 1970s, emerging in the 1980s during the conceptual design of the VLT, implemented in the 1990s. During three decades, ESO and its European partners took the lead with tenacity. The talk will remind some of the decisive, and sometimes critical, moments of this long story and depicts some of its main actors. 

10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — ESO Science Ambassadors: a (interactive) overview
Chris Harrison, Fabrizio Arrigoni Battaia and Lucy Moorcraft (ESO)

Abstract

During 2018, the fellows and students of ESO (Garching and Vicatura), have been leading a project in 8 ESO member states and Chile. The goals have been to: (1) promote science opportunities for young researchers; (2) take the Supernova experience to the people and (3) raise general awareness of ESO with a focus on the ELT. Overall we had 52 ambassadors carrying out these activities in the member states, including many without an ESO affiliation but were still enthused to help fulfil the aims of the project. In this informal discussion we will give an overview of the project, summarise our experiences, assess the impact that we have had and present the lessons we learnt. There will also be an opportunity to try out some of the hands-on activities that we took to science festivals and donated to educational centres.

 

 

27/11/18 (Tuesday)
15:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Exoplanets in Ondřejov - ground based support of space missions
Petr Kabáth (Ondřejov Observatory)

Abstract

The Exoplanet group in Ondrejov, CZ was founded in 2016. The astronomical Institute Ondrejov operates a 2-m telescope equipped with an Echelle spectrograph. In the seminar an overview about the potential of our ground based support program for exoplanetary missions will be presented. Furthermore, our institute, in cooperation with Tautenburg Observatory and Universidad Catolica de Chile, plans to design a new spectrograph for 1.52m telescope at ESO La Silla observatory, which should contribute to candidate vetting process for PLATO in the future and perhaps for TESS. As an additional program, we are working on characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres which will be also briefly presented in this talk.

12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Deep into the heart of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy with MUSE
Mayte Alfaro (MPIA, Heidelberg)

Abstract

A high fraction of dwarf galaxies host a nuclear star cluster (NSC), which shows characteristics similar to the high-mass and metal complex globular clusters (GCs). This suggests that these type of GCs could be former NSCs, stripped remnants of dwarf galaxies accreted by the Milky Way.

M54 is the closest extragalactic NSC and it lies at the center of its host - the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy (Sgr dSph) - in a privileged position where we can resolve its stellar populations. This high-mass and chemically complex cluster offers the opportunity to understand low-mass galaxy nuclei in the unique stage preceding the total disruption of the host galaxy. I will present a large MUSE data set covering out to ∼2.5 effective radii of M54 from which we extracted ∼6600 member stars. With metallicity and age estimates on this data, we have been able to disentangle the star formation history of this NSC in unprecedented detail, detecting at least three stellar sub-populations. I will explain how these findings might be an evidence of the concurrent action of the two proposed NSC formation scenarios: (i) infall and accretion of GCs by dynamical friction effects, and (ii) in-situ star formation from enriched gas.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — How different are in-situ and ex-situ stellar population properties? - Insights from IllustrisTNG galaxies
Moritz Fischer (MPIA)
10:00, Volans (ESO room E.2.27) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Observations of magnetic fields in Herbig Ae/Be stars
Markus Schöller (ESO)

Abstract

Models of magnetically driven accretion reproduce many observational properties of T Tauri stars. For the more massive Herbig Ae/Be stars, the corresponding picture has been questioned lately, in part driven by the fact that their magnetic fields are typically one order of magnitude weaker. Indeed, the search for magnetic fields in Herbig Ae/Be stars has been quite time consuming, with a detection rate of about 10%, also limited by the current potential to detect weak magnetic fields. Over the last two decades, magnetic fields were found in about twenty objects and for only two Herbig Ae/Be stars was the magnetic fieldgeometry constrained. Also, several studies were undertaken to investigate the time dependence of spectroscopic tracers of magnetospheric accretion (MA). Overall, it seems that while there is proof that MA is present in some Herbig Ae stars, there is less evidence for the Herbig Be stars. In this review talk I will provide an overview about the current state of the MA research in Herbig Ae/Be stars and will give an outlook on what we might expect in the future.

26/11/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Biomolecular structures and dynamics: combining experimental data with computer simulations
Jochen Hub (Univ. des Saarlandes)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Resolution study of core-collapse supernova models in 3D
Tobias Melson (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — Prevalence of neutral gas in centres of merging galaxies
Rajeshwari Dutta (ESO)
23/11/18 (Friday)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Magnetic field evolution of neutron stars
Ashley Bransgrove (Columbia Univ.)
22/11/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The most massive stars
Alex de Koter (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

Massive stars may have been the first sources of light after the Big Bang.  They are potential contributors to the re-ionization of the Universe and have likely played a crucial role in galaxy formation.  The most massive stars today easily outshine the sun by a factor of a million or more, hence provide strong radiative feedback on their host environment.  Through powerful stellar winds and supernova ejecta they enrich their surroundings with newly processed chemical elements, which constitute the building block of terrestrial planets and life. The recent detection of gravitational waves revealed surprisingly high black hole masses, pointing to very massive progenitor stars in binary systems.

In this talk I will first sketch the role of massive stars in the grand scheme of things. Then, I will focus on aspects of the outcome of the formation of the most massive stars, including maximum formation mass, initial mass function, spin rates and multiplicity properties.  Finally, I will present a possible new insight into the formation mechanism of massive close binaries.

21/11/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Deep Spectroscopic Observations of Quiescent Galaxies at High Redshift
Sirio Belli (MPE)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — What can comets tell us about the Solar System history?
Rosita Kokotanekova (ESO)

Abstract

Comets are considered to be leftover planetesimals from the epoch of planet formation. As such, they are believed to still preserve information about the physical conditions in the protoplanetary disc. However, the current comet population also bears the signatures of the dynamical processes during the epoch of planetary migration ~4 billion years ago. Moreover, active comets are known to experience dramatic changes in the current epoch due to sublimation close to perihelion. These considerations imply that many of the primordial properties of comets might have been significantly altered. Therefore, in order to use comets to study the early Solar System, we need to disentangle the signatures of each stage of their evolution.

The complicated history makes comets some of the most interesting and most complex objects in the Solar System and has motivated a number of recent space missions. The latest mission to a comet was ESA/Rosetta which followed comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko along its orbit between 2014 and 2016 and provided unprecedented continuous observations of the comet nucleus. Rosetta answered many long-standing questions in cometary science but it also fueled anew the debate of how pristine comet nuclei are.

In this discussion, I will begin with a brief introduction on the current understanding of comet evolution in the Solar System. I will then proceed to highlight some of the most puzzling discoveries from Rosetta. Finally, I will present the open questions in cometary science which I aim to answer with the help of telescope observations.

 

20/11/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Special Colloquium
Talk — Science and Society: On the Vital Role of Basic Research in Realizing Societies Dreams and Aspirations: The Usefulness of Useless Knowledge
Helmut Schwarz (TU Berlin)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Galaxy Cluster Discussion Group
Talk — X-ray, SZ and dark matter in galaxy clusters
Stefano Ettori (INAF-OAS)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Astronomy at Dome A, Antarctica
Lifan Wang (Department of Physics & Astronomy, Texas A&M University)

Abstract

Dome A, Antarctica is a unique site for astronomical observations. It is a site with a median temperature of -70 degree centigrade in the winter time. The atmospheric turbulence layer has a height of only around 14 meters. The preceptible water vapor is the lowest on the surface of Earth. The austral winter lasts over 3 months with low sky background in the optical and the near IR. These properties enable a broad range of astronomical observations. Both ongoing astronomical activities and future potentials will be discussed. 

19/11/18 (Monday)
17:15, TUM Garching, Physik Department, HS 2 | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — The space radiation environment and its implication for human exploration missions
Thomas Berger (DLR)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Measuring the Size of Convective Cores with Multi-D Simulations
Johann Higl (MPA)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Seminar
Talk — Thick discs in galaxies were most likely not accreted
Sebastien Comeron (University of Oulu)

Abstract

Thick discs are nearly ubiquitous components of the discs of present-day galaxies. They have a larger scale-height and a lower surface-brightness than their thin counterparts. Their formation mechanism has been debated in the literature. It has been proposed that a fraction of their stars has been accreted.

To test whether the above hypothesis holds true for a large fraction of the thick disc stars, we observed a sample of eight nearby edge-on galaxies with the MUSE integral field unit at the VLT.

We built thick disc rotation curves for the observed galaxies. None of them shows evidence for large amounts of retrograde stars. Accounting for those found in the literature, there are 15-20 available thick disc rotation curves, with only one showing clear signatures from retrograde material.

Based on literature numerical studies on dynamical friction, we estimate that at the current cosmic time one in six mergers for which the stars of the accreted galaxy ended in a thick disc were retrograde. This is a growing tension with the observed 1/15-1/20 fraction of galaxies with thick disc retrograde material. Therefore, an accretion origin as the main thick disc formation mechanism is not favoured by observations.

 

16/11/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — A hierarchical model for the energies and arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR)
Francesca Capel (KTH - Sweden)

Abstract

The study of UHECR is challenged by both the rarity of events and the difficulty in modelling their production, propagation and detection. The physics behind these processes is complicated, requiring high-dimensional models which are impossible to fit to data using traditional methods. I present a Bayesian hierarchical model which enables a joint fit of the UHECR energy spectrum and arrival directions with a physical model of UHECR phenomenology. In this way, possible associations with potential astrophysical sources can be assessed in a physically and statistically principled manner. The importance of including the UHECR energies is demonstrated through simulations and results from the application of the model to data from the Pierre Auger observatory are shown. The potential to extend this framework to more realistic physical models and multi-messenger observations is also discussed.

15/11/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — IllustrisTNG: the next generation of hydrodynamical galaxy formation simulations
Annalisa Pillepich (MPIA, Heidelberg)

Abstract

I will describe the numerical efforts to simulate galaxies with the moving-mesh code AREPO across an unprecedented range of halo massses, environments, evolutionary stages and cosmic times. In particular, I will focus on the IllustrisTNG project (www.tng-project.org), a series of three gravity+magnetohydrodynamics cosmological volumes of 50, 100, and 300 Mpc a side, respectively, in a LCDM cosmology. With these, we are capable of both resolving the inner structure of the Universe with thousands among massive groups and clusters of galaxies. I will discuss what is explicitly and empirically solved in gravity+magnetohydrodynamics simulations for galaxy formation in a cosmological context and what is required and what it means to "successfully" reproduce populations of galaxies which resemble the real ones. I will therefore show novel insights allowed by the new simulations, ranging from the assembly of the most massive structures in the Universe to the changes in the star-formation activity and morphological mix of galaxies at early epochs.

14/11/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — New Light on Standard Candles: Cepheids as sensitive stellar laboraties and accurate cosmic yardsticks
Richard Anderson (ESO)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Dynamical clues to the formation of star clusters
Sebastian Kamann (LJMU, Liverpool)

Abstract

The star cluster population of the Milky Way provides a unique window to study the formation history of our Galaxy. The conditions of the epochs when the Milky Way built up most of its stellar mass are preserved in the star clusters we observe to date. However, the physics governing the formation of star clusters are still not entirely understood. For example, ancient globular clusters show subtle differences in the chemical compositions of their stars which appear to be absent in the clusters forming today. Does this suggest that cluster formation varies with mass or cosmic age? In my presentation, I want to show how we can use the stellar dynamics of the clusters to answer such questions. Thanks to satellites such as Hubble or Gaia and powerful spectrographs we can nowadays study the motions of representative samples of stars in clusters of all ages. Using data from the MUSE spectrograph, we could already show that rotation played a crucial role in the formation of globular clusters and that they harbour larger populations of black holes than previously thought. We are further using the data to search for differences in the kinematics of their stellar populations. If detected, such differences put stringent constraints on the mechanisms that led to the formation of multiple populations in globular clusters.

13/11/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — IR Spectroscopic Tracers for (obscured) Galaxies: Galaxy Evolution with SPICA, a Cryogenic IR Telescope
Juan Antonio Fernández Ontiveros (INAF, Rome)

Abstract

The diagnostic power of IR spectroscopy will be of crucial importance to study the galaxy evolution during the dust-obscured phase at the peak of the star formation and black-hole accretion activity (1 < z < 4). The unique suite of spectral lines and dust features present in the mid- to far-IR range allow us to determine the physical conditions in galaxies (e.g. density, ionisation, metallicity) using robust tracers with a feeble response to both extinction and temperature. The SPace IR telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA), a 2.5m cryogenic (< 8K) IR telescope (12-230 micron) currently in competition for the ESA medium-class mission call M5, has been particularly designed to study the physical processes that govern the formation and evolution of galaxies and black holes through cosmic time. Taking advantage of diagnostic tools in the mid- to far-IR range, SPICA will be able to: i) obtain the first spectroscopic determination of both the star-formation rate and black hole accretion rate histories of galaxies in the last 12 Gyr for large statistically significant samples; ii) unveil the role of feedback in galaxy evolution during the last 10 Gyr and explore the detectability of metal-rich inflows in the local Universe, characterising the duty cycle in galaxies; iii) investigate the chemical evolution of galaxies and the dust composition up to z ~ 4; iv) trace the evolution of dust obscured galaxies back to the epoch of reionisation. Finally, I will also discuss the possible synergies between SPICA (planned for ~2030) and future first-class facilities (JWST, ELTs, Athena, SKA).

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — CMB B-modes: optical systematics and novel non-Gaussianity
Adri Duivenvoorden (Stockholm Univ.)
10:00, Tucana (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Where do the spirals come from? Multi-wavelength, high-resolution study of HD 135344B
Paolo Cazzoletti (MPE)
12/11/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Rosetta at comet 67P: deciphering the origin of the solar system, the Earth and life
Kathrin Altwegg (Univ. Bern)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Reconstruction of the nearby galactic dust using Gaia data
Reimar Leike (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — Near-ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Star-forming Galaxies from eBOSS: Signatures of Ubiquitous Galactic-scale Outflows
Johan Comparat (MPE)
09/11/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — UBIK - a universal Bayesian imaging toolkit
Jakob Knollmüller (MPA Garching)

Abstract

The abstract problem of recovering signals from data is at the core of any scientific progress. In astrophysics, the signal of interest is the Universe around us. It is varying in space, time and frequency and it is populated by a large variety of phenomena. To capture some of its aspects, large and complex instruments are build. How to combine their information consistently into one picture? UBIK allows to fuse data from multiple instruments within one unifying framework. A joint reconstruction of multiple instruments can provide a deeper picture of the same object, as it becomes far easier to distinguish between the signal and instrumental effects. Underlying to UBIK is variational Bayesian inference, allowing uncertainty quantification for parameters jointly. The first incarnation of UBIK demonstrates the versatility of this approach with a number of examples.

08/11/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Cosmological tension? New physics or new data challenges
Catherine Heymans (The Royal Observatory, Edinburgh)

Abstract

With the increasing precision of a wide range of cosmological measurements, tensions are starting to appear in the previously concordant model of Cosmology.  Examples are the discordance between direct measurements of the Hubble expansion rate, and the clustering of dark matter, in comparison to their predicted values from the Planck CMB measurements.

In this talk I’ll review cosmological parameter constraints from the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS), a now almost complete ESO survey that studies the growth of structures and the expansion history of the Universe using weak gravitational lensing.   As our analysis also finds a low-redshift universe that is in mild tension with the predictions of the Planck CMB experiment, I’ll discuss whether these recent results are our first hint that the Universe is rather more exotic than the standard LambdaCDM model would suggest, or whether this is a sign that new data challenges lie ahead.

13:30, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Seminar
Talk — Tomo-e CMOS Camera and TAO 6.5-m telescope
Mamoru Doi (Institute of Astronomy, Tokyo)

Abstract

Institute of Astronomy (IoA), School of Science, UTokyo, is operating the Kiso 1.05-m Schmidt telescope since 1974.  A new CMOS camera Tomo-e which has 20 sq. degree of field of view at the Kiso Schmidt telescope is being built.  Tomo-e will use 84 CMOS sensors manufactured by CANON.  I will introduce the design, characteristics, current status, and future plan of Tomo-e.

The University of Tokyo Atacama Observatory (TAO) Project is to construct and operate a 6.5m infrared telescope at the summit of Co. Chajnantor (altitude 5640m) in northern Chile by UTokyo.  Thanks to the dry climate and the high altitude, excellent observation condition in the NIR to MIR wavelengths is verified with a pathfinder 1-m telescope miniTAO. The 6.5m telescope has two Nasmyth foci where two facility instruments, SWIMS for the near-infrared and MIMIZUKU for the mid- infrared, will be installed and two folded- Cassegrain foci for carry-in instruments. The telescope including three mirrors are almost completed, and civil work at the site is underway. I will give project overview as well as the current status of TAO project.

07/11/18 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — A new image-differencing method and Its application to precision photometry, surveys for transients, and imaging polarimetry
Lifan Wang (Texas A&M University)

Abstract

I introduce an algorithm that simultaneously map the photometry, astrometry, and PSFs of multiple images to study differential changes. The algorithm employs the most general delta-function convolution kernel. It is coded in Fourier space which makes it adaptable to GPUs for fast data processing. I will discuss problems associated with difference imaging, especially correlated errors generated during image combination and methods to de-correlate background errors. I will show examples of such operations and the limitations of de-correlated images. Differential comparisons of images are widely used in supernova search, exoplanet transit search, and imaging polarimetry.

06/11/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Direct search for light dark matter with the CRESST-III experiment
Federica Petricca (MPP)
14:00, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Talk
Talk — Insights from high resolution (multi-band) spectroscopy - an application to the ejecta of classical novae
Elena Mason (Observatory of Trieste)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Probing the host-BH interplay at the extreme of the AGN luminosity function
Federica Duras (Università Degli Studi Roma Tre)

Abstract

The existence of a long-lasting link between the central black hole mass and various physical properties of their host spheroids is now a matter of fact. Studying the correlations between the two at different ages is then the best way to rebuild their cosmic evolution.

Within this scenario, we have built up two complementary AGN samples able to probe the accreting phases at both a) very high luminosity (>10^47 erg/s) and BH masses (10^9-10  Msol), i.e. the WISSH Sample, and b) very low luminosities (~10^43 erg/s) and BH masses (~10^5 Msol), i.e. studying sources extracted from the SWIFT/BAT catalog.

By performing AGN-dedicated SED-fitting procedures we derived the main physical properties of both the nuclear engine and the host galaxy of these sources, i.e. bolometric luminosities, star formation rates and stellar masses. We will present the accreting and star formation properties of these sources, comparing the two classes of objects. 

Moreover, we are able to constrain the BH-galaxy scaling relation over three orders of magnitudes in mass and to follow its evolution from z~3 to z~0. I will show that while the more massive galaxies populate the typical region of the already observed MBH-Mstar relation, the less massive ones are still on their way to reach the MBH-Mstar locus, especially obscured AGN which seem to be hosted in less massive galaxies compared to unobscured ones, given the same BH.

We will also present a new universal hard X-ray bolometric correction, which spans about 7 orders of luminosity thus allowing to derive more accurate predictions on the accretion history of the AGN and their host galaxies.

05/11/18 (Monday)
17:15, TUM Garching, Physik Department, HS 2 | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Ultrafast spectroscopy of excited state dynamics in dynamics in metal-halide perovskite semiconductors novel functional materials for optoelectronics
Felix Deschler (Univ. of Cambridge)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Coupling 1D and 3D simulations to improve stellar structure models
Andreas Joergensen (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — The shell, multiplexing, version control and other command line goodness
Mathias André (ESO)
View slides |

Abstract

In this talk, we'll first have a look at how to make better use of the shell by looking at some of the most useful commands and how to combine them.

In the second part we'll look at a few other tools that can be useful if you have to write, maintain or run any kind of code: git, tmux and docker. ***Bring your laptop!***

October 2018

31/10/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Chemical Evolution and Gas Flows in Star-Forming Galaxies in 3D
I-Ting Ho (MPIA, Heidelberg)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Q&A session on the ELT telescope
Jason Spyromillo (ESO)

Abstract

The ELT telescope is under construction. In this informal discussion we offer a Question and Answer session on the telescope system. Do you have questions about how the primary mirror works, how the segments are made, the shape of the other mirrors, why is M4 deformable, what does M5 do, how many guide probes do we use, what is a phasing station, is the dome really that big, how much does the telescope weigh, how will we point the telescope? Or more?

30/10/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Revitalizing lens H0 measurements using polarization monitoring
Andy Biggs (ESO)

Abstract

The JVAS and CLASS surveys discovered 22 gravitational lens systems and hopes were high that many time-delay measurements would follow. However, for only three of the systems was a clear signal of variability detected and a time delay determined. Almost totally overlooked, however, was the possibility of determining the time delay from polarization variability. I have recently performed a reanalysis of archival VLA monitoring data and find that the polarization variability is greater than that in total flux density and can provide a time delay where the total flux density cannot. I will give an overview of my results, including a new time delay.

11:00, USM Roof Seminar Room | ESO Garching
USM Special Seminar
Talk — LoCuSS: Galaxy properties in and around massive clusters at z=0.2
Matteo Bianconi (University of Birmingham)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Radiation chemistry: a vital element for the accurate chemical modeling of star and planet-forming regions
Christopher Shingledecker (MPE/CAS)
29/10/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Recent developments in 3D computer vision
Daniel Cremers (Informatik, TUM)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Missing baryons and Kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect through a Bayesian eye
Minh Nguyen (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — Systematic search for molecular hydrogen in a large sample of GRB spectra observed with X-shooter: The nature of high-redshift GRB DLAs
Jan Bolmer (MPE)
26/10/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Planetary Nebulae as tracers of galaxy evolution in Andromeda
Souradeep Bhattacharya (ESO)

Abstract

Planetary nebulae (PNe) are excellent tracers of stellar light in galaxies. Owing of their relatively strong [OIII] 5007 emission, they can be readily identified in external galaxies. I discuss the known properties of PNe populations in external galaxies and their utility as tracers to give insight into the evolution of Andromeda (M31). M31 has been observed to have a number of substructures embedded in its inner halo, pointing to a rich merger history. PNe are ideal discrete tracers to study its halo and substructures. With the MegaCam at CFHT, we have carried out a survey of the central 16 sq. degrees of Andromeda (M31) reaching the outer disk and halo to identify ~4000 PNe in M31, of which ~3000 are newly discovered. This survey extends the previous PN sample both in uniform area coverage and depth. We obtain PNe down to ~6 mag below the bright cut-off of the PN luminosity function (PNLF), 2 mag deeper than in previous works.

We are now able to detect a steep rise in the number of PNe ~4.5 mag fainter than the bright cut-off. We explore possible reasons for this rise which give insights into the stellar population of M31 and the nature of the PNe population.

25/10/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — New views on the Galaxy and its satellites from the Gaia space mission
Amina Helmi (Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen)

Abstract

The recent 2nd data release of the Gaia mission is revolutionizing our understanding of the Milky Way and its constituents. In this talk, I will highlight a few of the first results stemming from the analysis of this truly spectacular dataset. In particular, I will focus on what we have learned about the dynamics and assembly of the Milky Way and its satellites thus far.

11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — Optical Linear and Circular Polarization Observations of M87
Alejandra Fresco (MPE)
24/10/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Probing Cosmic Structures with X-ray Survey of Galaxy Clusters
Gayoung Chon (LMU)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Galaxy Cluster Discussion Group
Talk — AGN clustering in the Magneticum Pathfinder Simulations
Lisa Steinborn (USM)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — GAIA DR2 results
ESO staff (ESO)

Abstract

The recent second release (DR2) of the Gaia catalog has allowed researchers in several fields of astronomy to gain new insights in their work, and to immediately obtain unforeseen results. In order to give an idea of the numbers and on the variety of these results, several ESO staff have agreed to give a very quick (5 min) introduction to their results obtained using Gaia DR2 data.

The program will be as follows:

10:45     Welcome and introduction

10:50     Tereza Jerabkova: What’s up with Gaia photometry: the case of the Orion Nebula Cluster

10:55     Giacomo Beccari: A sextet of clusters in the Vela OB2 region revealed  by Gaia

11:00     Carlo Manara: Gaia DR2 view of the Lupus V–VI clouds: The candidate diskless young stellar objects are mainly background contaminants

11:05     Christian Hummel: GAIA parallaxes of SB2s with interferometric orbits

11:10     Michael Hilker: Mean proper motions, space orbits and velocity dispersion profiles of Galactic globular clusters derived from GAIA DR2 data

11:15     Preben Grosbol: Spiral Potential of the Sagittarius arm

11:20     Richard Anderson: Milky Way Cepheid Standards for Measuring Cosmic Distances and Application to Gaia DR2: Implications for the Hubble Constant

11:25     Palle Moeller: Resolving the longstanding quasar selection bias with DR2

23/10/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Finally Deviations from Standard Model? or Just Non-perturbative Effects?
Holger Nielsen (Niels Bohr Institute)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Bias in galaxy clusters samples: optical/infrared versus X-ray
Miriam Ramos Ceja (Argelander Institute for Astronomy, Bonn)

Abstract

Systematic searches for galaxy clusters have traditionally been conducted at optical wavelengths. While some optical catalogues still are the largest compilations of galaxy clusters, the inherent biases to the optical selection process, most importantly projection effects, are difficult to correct for in statistical studies of cluster properties. In the last two decades, X-ray and sub-millimetre observations have provided some of the most pure galaxy cluster catalogues, overcoming most of the optical biases. Especially, X-ray observations provide powerful means of selecting galaxy clusters and characterising their properties. Albeit these differences, optical/infrared and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters complement each other. In this talk I will present two of such complementary studies: 1) our findings on the physical properties of high redshift (z > 0.8) cluster samples that have been selected at different wavelengths in a common area of the sky: SpARCS in infrared and XMM-LSS in X-rays, 2) a search for new galaxy groups previously undetected in the ROSAT-All-sky survey, which have been identified in optical observations. These studies can tell us which types of galaxy clusters have been missed in samples constructed in past surveys, and the possible impact they can have on cosmological parameter constraints obtained through cluster counts.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Exploring the galaxy-halo connection using incomplete samples of cosmological surveys
Hong Guo (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory)
22/10/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The Millennium Hausseminar
Simon White (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Things that go "dip" in the night: from disintegrating planets to alien megastructures
Megan Ansdell (University of California Berkeley, Department of Astronomy)

Abstract

The advent of space-based telescopes that provide high-precision time-series photometry, such as CoRoT and Kepler, have revealed a zoo of stellar variability on timescales from minutes to months. In this talk, I will focus on classes of objects whose light curves show distinctive "dips" that can tell us a surprising amount about planet formation, evolution, and death. These include disintegrating planets, young dipper systems, likely exocomets, and unlikely alien megastructures.

19/10/18 (Friday)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — Correlations between radio and bolometric X-ray fluxes between GX339-4 abd H1743-322
Nazma Islam (NCAC, Warszawa)
18/10/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Probing the emergence of the Universe from Dark Ages with cosmic infrared background
Alexander Kashlinsky (Goddard Space Flight Center)
Download video |

Abstract

I will review the current theoretical understanding of first stars and black holes and their potential contributions to the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB). Intriguing indications of the possible emissions from these objects have been obtained from source-subtracted CIB fluctuation measurements using Spitzer/IRAC deep images. The uncovered source-subtracted CIB fluctuations substantially exceed those from remaining known populations. The spatial spectrum of these fluctuations is consistent with populations clustering according to high-z LCDM model. The SED of the CIB fluctuations is blue and consistent with emissions produced by hot objects at high z. Cross-correlation analysis with Chandra X-ray data suggests that the unresolved CIB and CXB are coherent at a remarkably high level implying a fractional abundance of black holes, among the emitters of the CIB, which significantly exceeds that in known populations. I will then discuss an ongoing CIB project, LIBRAE (Looking at Infrared Background Radiation Anisotropies with Euclid), approved by NASA and ESA for the Euclid satellite mission.  LIBRAE will identify the net emissions from the first stars era, lead to a better understanding of the condition of intergalactic medium at that epoch, and, in conjunction with eROSITA, accurately isolate the contributions from the first black holes.

Video

Loading the player...
11:30, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — Searching for evidence of molecular outflows in z~6 quasars
Flora Stanley (Chalmers)

Abstract

Little is known currently about the outflow properties of luminous AGN at the early epochs of galaxy evolution, in this talk I will present our recent search for evidence of the presence of high velocity outflows in quasars of z~6. We have used archival ALMA observations of the [CII] emission line of quasars at z~6 and stacking techniques to detect a broad-line/outflow component in the stacked spectra. We have performed a monte-carlo analysis to find the subsample of sources most likely to show an outflow component in their stacked line. In this talk I will discuss the methods, and results of the full- and sub-sample analysis, and the caveats of stacking techniques. Finally I will  compare to other parallel work done by other teams for high-z studies as well as the knowledge derived from local AGN.

11:00, MPE Old Seminar Room 209 | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — Immersive visualizations of astrophysical simulations from the Galactic Center to the Cosmic Web
Christopher Russell (Pontificia Univ. de Chile)
17/10/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Galaxy Cluster Discussion Group
Talk — Gone after one orbit: How cluster environments quench galaxies
Marcel Lotz (USM)
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18a | ESO Garching
HEG Seminar
Talk — X-ray pulsars at the Eddington limit: A study of the 2017 outburst of Swift J0243.6+6124
Giorgos Vasilopoulos (Yale Univ.)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Unexpected Topology of the Cosmic Microwave Background
Pratyush Pranav (ENS Lyon)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — A multi-messenger study of the Milky Way with LISA, Gaia and LSST
Valeriya Korol (Leiden Observatory)

Abstract

The upcoming LISA mission is the only experiment that offers the opportunity to study the Milky Way through gravitational wave radiation, exploiting the signals from Galactic double white dwarf (DWD) binaries. I will show that the large number of DWD detections will allow us to use these systems as tracers of the Milky Way potential. Furthermore, in the coming years, a large number of DWDs can be simultaneously detected in both electromagnetic (e.g. with Gaia and LSST) and gravitational wave radiation. This will provide a unique opportunity to perform a multi-messenger study of the Galaxy. Finally, I will talk about prospects of observing extra-galactic DWDs in the Local Group.

 

16/10/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The puzzle of neutrino masses
Sebastian Boeser (Univ. Mainz)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The AKARI 2.5-5um Spectra of Local Luminous Infrared Galaxies
Hanae Inami (CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon)

Abstract

The PAH features detected in the infrared range between ~3 and 20um have been extensively used as reliable indicators for distinguishing the dominant energy source of dusty galaxies, such as starburst or active galactic nucleus (AGN). The 3.3um PAH feature is the only PAH feature that will be observable with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at z > 3.5, because the rest of the features at longer wavelengths fall outside the JWST wavelength coverage. However, detailed studies that compare the most frequently used 3.3um and 6.2um PAH features are still limited, because the former was only observable with the AKARI infrared astronomical satellite and the latter was only observable with the Spitzer Space Telescope. In this talk, I will show a direct comparison between the 3.3um and 6.2 PAH feature detected in ~150 local luminous infrared galaxies, which are the best analogs for star-forming galaxies in the early Universe. Then, I will discuss how to adapt these results based on the rest-frame 2-5um range to observe high-z galaxies with JWST.

11:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
Special USM Talk
Talk — A novel data analysis pipeline for global 21-cm cosmology with ground and space-based experiments
David Rapetti (Univ. of Colorado/Boulder)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — (topic to be announced)
Ryo Namba (McGill University)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Constraining dark energy with and after GW170817
Johannes Noller (Oxford)
15/10/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Stellar parameters in an instant with machine learning
George Angelou (MPA)
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Origin of Life - on Earth and Planets
Karin Moelling (Inst of medical Microbiology Zuerich and MPI of Molecular Genetics Berlin)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — The ALMA view on the Mass-Size relation at z>1
Annagrazia Puglisi (CEA Saclay)
11:00, MPE Old Seminar Room 209 | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — Comparison = between real and synthetic observations of the multi-phase ISM in the nucleus of the Circinus galaxy
Keiichi Wada (Kagoshima University, Japan)
12/10/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Bayesian Probabilistic Numerical Methods
Tim Sullivan (Free University of Berlin and Zuse Institute Berlin)

Abstract

Numerical computation --- such as numerical solution of a PDE --- can modelled as a statistical inverse problem in its own right. The popular Bayesian approach to inversion is considered, wherein a posterior distribution is induced over the object of interest by conditioning a prior distribution on the same finite information that would be used in a classical numerical method, thereby restricting attention to a meaningful subclass of probabilistic numerical methods distinct from classical average-case analysis and information-based complexity. The main technical consideration here is that the data are non-random and thus the standard Bayes' theorem does not hold. General conditions will be presented under which numerical methods based upon such Bayesian probabilistic foundations are well-posed, and a sequential Monte-Carlo method will be shown to provide consistent estimation of the posterior. The paradigm is extended to computational ``pipelines'', through which a distributional quantification of numerical error can be propagated. A sufficient condition is presented for when such propagation can be endowed with a globally coherent Bayesian interpretation, based on a novel class of probabilistic graphical models designed to represent a computational work-flow. The concepts are illustrated through explicit numerical experiments involving both linear and non-linear PDE models.

(This is a sequel to the talk by Philipp Hennig last month).

11/10/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — SN cosmology: astrophysical biases and the Hubble Constant
Mickael Rigault (CNRS/IN2P3)
Download video |

Abstract

Type Ia supernova are powerful cosmological distance indicators that enable us to measure the expansion history of the Universe. Using SNe Ia distances, scientists discovered the accelerating expansion of the Universe, leading to a Nobel prize and a broad focus on understanding the underlying cause of this acceleration.  SNe Ia distances are also key to measuring the Hubble Constant, the current expansion rate of the Universe and a key cosmological parameter.  Interestingly, the SNe Ia measurements of H0 are ~4 sigma away from the those derived from CMB temperature anisotropy measurements from Planck.  This highly discussed tension could be a sign of new physics, such as a new family of neutrinos.  However, I will discuss how recent studies of SNe Ia in the nearby Universe indicate two separate populations of SNe Ia with different peak luminosities. These differences in the underlying SNe Ia population could introduce a bias in the derived H0 and be the true cause of the tension with CMB measurements.

Video

Loading the player...
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Say NIHAO to black holes: How AGN feedback affects galaxies and their scaling relations
Marvin Blank (NYU Abu Dhabi)
10/10/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Astrophysics and -chemistry in cryogenic ion traps
Dieter Gerlich (Prof. em., Univ. Chemnitz)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — The role of cosmic ray-driven processes in interstellar ices
Christopher Shingledecker (MPE)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — MOND: theoretical efforts to reproduce galaxy dynamics without dark matter
Federico Lelli (ESO)

Abstract

Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) is an alternative to non-baryonic dark matter, proposed by Israeli physicist Moti Milgrom. Back in July, we discussed the general predictions of this paradigm and how they fare with astronomical observations. In this second part, we will discuss some specific examples of non-relativistic MOND theories, which can be derived from a Lagrangian formulation. These MOND theories satisfy the usual conservation laws (energy, momentum) but violate other principles, like the strong equivalence principle in the case of modified gravity or locality in the case of modified inertia. Even if you did not attend the first part of this informal discussion, you should be able to actively participate in this second part.

09/10/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The discovery of the Higgs boson: a great achievement and a problem
Jean Zinn-Justin (Saclay)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — SEAGLE -- Disentangling the galaxy formation mechanism via simulated strong lenses
Sampath Mukherjee (RUG)
08/10/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — A novel approach to infer cosmology from large-scale structure
Fabian Schmidt (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — History of radio galaxies
Guillaume Drouart (Curtin Universtity of Technology)
View slides |

Abstract

Radio galaxies - aka type 2 radio loud AGN - have been instrumental in our understanding of galaxy evolution. I will present a short review on the history of radio galaxies from the 60s to nowadays and some of the key discoveries made thanks to these particular objects. From an observational perspective, I will cover the main physical properties associated with galaxy hosts and supermassive black holes, jets and lobes and what kind of information radio observations can give us in comparison to other AGN classes. I will also remember some of the questions that are still debated, with sometimes contradictory results. Finally, I will give a short prospective in the near future, and how a second "golden age" of radio-astronomy will soon be upon us!

04/10/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — From our Galaxy to Distant DLAs: The Condensation of Gas-Phase Elements onto Interstellar Dust Grains
Edward B. Jenkins (Princeton University Observatory)
Download video |

Abstract

Over the past 45 years, investigations of ultraviolet absorption features in stellar spectra have revealed that most of the heavy elements in the interstellar medium are depleted from the gas phase to values well below solar or B star reference abundances. The strengths of such depletions reveal the composition of dust grains in space, and they can be characterized by a limited set of empirical parameters that can be linked to the average gas densities and the condensation temperatures of the elements. Two outstanding mysteries remain: one is the fact that the depletion of oxygen exceeds that needed for forming silicates or metallic oxides, and the other is that the chemically inert element krypton shows some depletion. When we observe absorption features in the spectra of quasars to derive the element abundances in foreground intervening galaxies, we can correct for effects of depletions by using the patterns found in our Galaxy or the Small Magellanic Cloud as examples.

Video

Loading the player...
02/10/18 (Tuesday)
13:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — (topic to be announced)
Marvin Blank (NYU Abu Dhabi)
13:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Magnetised clouds in the Galactic corona: Fuel for future star formation?
Asger Gronnow (University of Sydney)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The Colours of the Extreme Universe : Pushing the frontiers of panchromatic studies of star forming galaxies and AGN
Gabriela Calistro-Rivera (Leiden Observatory)

Abstract

In this talk I will present pioneering work on the panchromatic emission of some of the most luminous galaxies in the early Universe: star forming galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei. Using state-of-the-art statistical methods and new-generation radio-to-UV instruments, the presented results expand the parameter space covered by current multi-wavelength studies, pushing three different frontiers: the statistical frontier, the wavelength frontier and the resolution frontier. I will introduce a sophisticated statistical tool to robustly model the multi-wavelength emission of galaxies and AGN to push the statistical frontier. The wavelength frontier is pushed forward by exploring galaxy evolution from a new spectral window at low radio frequencies, opened by the LOFAR instrument. Finally, the resolution frontier will be pushed by exploring the resolved distribution of emission components across the spectrum using a combination of high-resolution ALMA and HST imaging.

10:00, Pavo (ESO room A.2.01) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Widespread SiO and CH3OH emission in Filamentary Infrared Dark Clouds
Giuliana Cosentino (ESO & UCL)

Abstract

The physical mechanisms leading to the formation of Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) are not completely understood and it is thus important to study their molecular gas kinematics and chemical content to search for any signature of the IRDCs formation process. Using the 30-m-diameter antenna at the IRAM30m telescope, we have obtained emission maps of dense gas tracers and typical shock tracers (SiO and CH3OH) towards three IRDCs and we have studied the molecular gas kinematics in these clouds. The IRDCs show complex gas kinematics substructures with correlated widespread (parsec-scale) emission of SiO and CH3OH. However, for one of the clouds the sample the detected widespread SiO and CH3OH emission shows very narrow line profiles and may have originated in a large-scale shock interaction.

01/10/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Inferring high-redshift large-scale structure dynamics from the Lyman-alpha forest
Natalia Porqueres (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — Measurements of Thermal Pressures for the Neutral Diffuse Gas in the Local Part of our Galaxy
Edward B. Jenkins (Princeton University Observatory)

September 2018

27/09/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Astrochemistry of protoplanetary disks
Edwin Bergin (University of Michigan)
Download video |

Video

Loading the player...
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Seminar
Talk — Asteroseismology for Galactic archaeology: intriguing matches along the (Milky) way
Victor Silva (Aarhus University)
26/09/18 (Wednesday)
15:30, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
High Energy Astrophysics
Talk — Solar energetic particles: Measurements with PAMELA
James Ryan (University of New Hampshire)
25/09/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The LHC endeavour: achievements and future plans
Guenther Dissertori (ETH Zuerich)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Stellar populations in nuclear star clusters
Nikolay Kacharov (MPIA, Heidelberg)

Abstract

The majority of galaxies host a very dense and massive star cluster in their centres. Often these nuclear star clusters (NSC) are the only surviving remnants of tidally disrupted galaxies and are usually classified as very massive globular clusters or ultra-compact dwarfs. At difference with typical globular clusters, however, NSCs often  have extended star formation histories (SFH). In this talk I will present the SFH of M54 (the NSC of the Sgr dwarf galaxy, currently under disruption by the tidal field of the Milky Way) as derived from a large MUSE data set of several thousand spectra of individual stars. I will also present the SFH analysis of the NSCs of several nearby galaxies, based on integrated light spectroscopy from X-Shooter, and argue that we are able to distinguish between the two main mechanisms of NSC formation: in situ star formation at the centre of the galaxy vs. stellar accretion.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Playing Your CARDs Right: Leveraging O*ne-Shot G*alactic Chemical Evolution Models to Understand and Predict Chemical Abundance Ratio Distributions in Old Galactic Systems
Duane Lee (MIT)
10:00, MPA room 006 | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Strategies and Tactics Developed at the University of Michigan to Enhance Diversity and Excellence in the Hiring Process
Edwin Bergin (University of Michigan)
24/09/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Cosmology with Kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect: Opportunities and Challenges
Daisuke Nagai (MPA long term visitor)
12:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Making an Earth
Edwin Bergin (University of Michigan)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Cosmology with Supernovae
Bruno Leibundgut (ESO)
View slides |

Abstract

The basic cosmological model for the interpretation of supernova data will be presented. Several fundamental tests of the cosmological model based on supernova observations will be described. The latest determinations of the cosmological parameters will be discussed.

21/09/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Probabilistic Numerics — Uncertainty in Computation
Philipp Hennig (Uni Tuebingen)
19/09/18 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Make your code famous! (or at least discoverable)
Alice Allen (University of Maryland)

Abstract

Open access to scientific results is rapidly gaining importance over the entire spectrum of scientific research. In particular for astrophysics, an important part of the research process includes the development of source codes.

Journal articles detail the general logic behind new results and ideas, but often the source codes that enable these results remain hidden from public view. In this presentation, I will discuss our recent study on the availability of source codes used for published astro research and how this affects the transparency and reproducibility of this research. The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL, ascl.net) was started in 1999 to encourage software availability and thus improve research transparency. I will cover what the ASCL is, how to submit software to the resource, and the benefits of doing so.

I will share how ASCL enables links between literature and software entries, in ADS and how an ASCL ID can be used for citing your code. I will also cover good and bad ways to cite software, avenues for publishing software, and how journals are changing to include and recognize the contribution software makes to our discipline.

18/09/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Reactor Neutrino Spectra and Sterile neutrino Searches
David Lhullier (CEA Saclay)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — On the interdependence of galaxy morphology, star formation, and environment in massive galaxies in the nearby Universe
Omkar Bait (National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Pune, India)

Abstract

Using multi-wavelength data, from UV-optical-near-mid IR, for $\sim$6000 galaxies in the local Universe, we study the dependence of star formation on the morphological T-types for massive galaxies ($\log M_*/M_\odot \geq 10$). We find that, early-type spirals (Sa-Sbc) and S0s predominate in the green valley, which is a transition zone between the star forming and quenched regions. Within the early-type spirals, as we move from Sa to Sbc spirals the fraction of green valley and quenched galaxies decreases, indicating the important role of the bulge in the quenching of galaxies. The fraction of early-type spirals decreases as we enter the green valley from the blue cloud, which coincides with the increase in the fraction of S0s. This points towards the morphological transformation of early-type spiral galaxies into S0s which can happen due to environmental effects such as ram-pressure stripping, galaxy harassment, or tidal interactions. We also find a second population of S0s which are actively star-forming and are present in all environments. Since morphological T-type, specific star formation rate (sSFR), and environmental density are all correlated with each other, we compute the partial correlation coefficient for each pair of parameters while keeping the third parameter as a control variable. We find that morphology most strongly correlates with sSFR, independent of the environment, while the other two correlations (morphology-density and sSFR-environment) are weaker. Thus, we conclude that, for massive galaxies in the local Universe, the physical processes that shape their morphology are also the ones that determine their star-forming state.

10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Probing the earliest phases of low-mass star formation: Characterization of First Core Candidates
Maria José Madureira (MPE)

Abstract

Observations of young star-forming cores are needed in order to better understand how low-mass stars form, evolve and the initial conditions of this process. Based on Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) properties, past studies have reported several extremely young low-mass star-forming cores. These SEDs indicate that these sources are younger than the typical Class 0 protostar. Furthermore, some of them are driving very small outflows with dynamical times up to only 10,000 years and low projected velocities (v<5 km/s), which are in agreement with simulations of extremely young outflows. Based on these observations these sources have been proposed to be in a theoretical stage intermediate between the prestellar and protostellar phases, in which the collapsing core is predicted to harbour a compact (prestellar) central object known as a First Hydrostatic Core (FHSC).

In this talk, I will present interferometric dust and molecular line emission observations towards 5 of these FHSC candidates that reveal the density structure, kinematics and chemical properties of the surrounding material at 1,000 AU scales. We identified two promising candidates that are consistent with being in an earlier evolutionary stage than most of the known class 0 protostars. The central object in these promising sources has an estimated mass of less than 0.06 Msun and emission line properties of the surrounding material qualitatively similar to those observed towards prestellar cores.  I will also highlight how future observations can help us to further reveal the true evolutionary state of these interesting objects.

13/09/18 (Thursday)
12:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Exploring the Complex Chemistry of Embedded Protostars
Jes Joergensen (Niels Bohr Inst.)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Lectures
Talk — Gravitational Waves from Inflation, Part II
Azadeh Maleknejad (MPA)
12/09/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Collaborative Nested Sampling for analysing big datasets
Johannes Buchner (PUC, Chile)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Galaxy Cluster Discussion Group
Talk — Molecular gas in the Antlia galaxy cluster
Joseph Cairns (ESO/Lancaster)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — The East Asian Observatory JCMT-Transient Survey: searching for sub-mm variability of protostars
Gregory J. Herczeg (Kavil Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University)

Abstract

Low-mass stars form via gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores.  Although their formation has received considerable attention in the last few decades, the rate at which a star gains most of its mass and the physics that drives the main phase of stellar growth is still not understood. Most protostars have luminosities significantly fainter than the luminosity expected from steady accretion over the protostellar lifetime.   The solution to this problem may lie in episodic mass accretion -- prolonged periods of very low accretion punctuated by short bursts of rapid accretion.  In this informal discussion, I will describe these challenges and initial constraints on protostellar variability from the East Asia Observatory JCMT/SCUBA2 sub-mm monitoring program of eight nearby star forming regions, the first large sub-mm variability program.

10:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
HEG Seminar
Talk — The NOAO Data Lab - A science platform for the entire astronomical community
Robert Nikutta (NOAO)
11/09/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Machine Learning Precision High Energy Physics
Stefano Forte (Univ. di Milano)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — ALMA 26 arcmin^2 Survey of GOODS-S at one-millimeter (ASAGAO): Average Morphology of High-z Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies in an Exponential-Disk (n ~ 1)
Seiji Fujimoto (University of Tokyo)

Abstract

We present morphological properties of dusty star-forming galaxies at z = 1-3 determined with the high-resolution (FWHM~0.′′19) ALMA 1-mm band maps of our ASAGAO survey covering a 26-arcmin2 area in GOODS-S and the ALMA archive. The present sample consists of 45 ALMA sources with a wide rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L_FIR range of 10^11-13 L⊙. To obtain an average rest-frame FIR profile, we perform individual measurements and careful stacking of the ALMA sources using the uv-visibility method that includes positional-uncertainty and smoothing-effect evaluations through Monte-Carlo simulations. We find that the dusty star-forming galaxies have the average FIR-wavelength Sersic index and effective radius of n_FIR = 1.2+/-0.2 and Re_FIR =1.0-1.3 kpc, respectively, additionally with a point source at the center, indicative of the existence of AGN. The average FIR profile agrees with a morphology of an exponential-disk clearly distinguished from a spheroidal profile (Sersic index of 4), and supports a positive correlation of the FIR size-luminosity relation. We also examine the rest-frame optical Sersic index n_opt and effective radius Re_opt with the deep HST images. Interestingly, we obtain n_opt = 0.9+/-0.3 (~ n_FIR) and Re_opt = 3.2+/-0.6 kpc (> Re_FIR), suggesting that the dusty disk-like structure is embedded within a larger stellar disk. The rest-frame UV and FIR data of HST and ALMA provide us a radial surface density pro le of the total star-formation rate (SFR), where the FIR SFR dominates over the UV SFR at the center. Under the simple assumption of a constant SFR, a compact stellar distribution found in z~1-2 compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) is well reproduced, while a spheroidal stellar morphology of cQGs (n_opt = 4) cannot, suggestive of other important mechanism(s) such as dynamical dissipation.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Studying Galaxy Evolution in Clusters with Romulus C: A Cosmological Simulation of a Galaxy Cluster with Unprecedented Resolution
Michael Tremmel (Yale University)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Discerning the Difficult to Detect: the Dim, the Diffuse, and the Dwarfs
Anna Wright (Rutgers University)
10:00, Pavo (ESO room A.2.01) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Testing the early evolution of pre-main sequence stars
Gregory J. Herczeg (Kavil Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University)

Abstract

Ages of pre-main sequence stars are notoriously uncertain, with implications for measurements of envelope and protoplanetary disk survival times and for quantifying local star formation histories. In any given cluster, a spread of apparent ages may be caused by individual differences in stellar evolution, by observational errors, or by a real age spread; discrepancies in ages versus stellar mass undermine the reliability of absolute age estimates for clusters.  I will discuss how uncertainties in early accretion histories affect the location of the stellar birth, how uncertainties in the internal structure affect the subsequent contraction, and how these uncertainties are being addressed with improved models and observational approaches.

10/09/18 (Monday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Astrophotos: From papers to public’s eyes
Mahdi Zamani (ESO)
View slides |

Abstract

In a time when cutting-edge observatories are publicly funded, the need for more communications with general public and sharing scientific results in a visually pleasant way is on the rise. The talk will be a quick surf on deep waters of scientific image processing  for outreach purpose at ESO and Hubble/ESA. That includes exploring the art used in the today's image processing methods with respect of  scientific boundaries and Astronomical Visualization Metadata (AVM) potentials for public and scientific community.

07/09/18 (Friday)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Probing the earliest phases of low-mass star formation: Characterization of First Core Candidates
Maria Jose Maureira (MPE)
11:00, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Talk
Talk — How many super-massive black holes are there?
Johannes Buchner (PUC Chile)
05/09/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Galaxy Cluster Discussion Group
Talk — A Joint Image-Visibility Study of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect at High Resolution
Luca di Mascolo (MPA)
04/09/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Using the fundamental plane to map peculiar motions in large-scale surveys
Christoph Saulder (Korea Institute for Advanced Study)

Abstract

With the rise of large-scale spectroscopy surveys, the amount of self-consistent data has reach unprecedented magnitudes. This data can be used to derive a multitude of parameters for the targeted galaxies, which allowed us to apply various redshift-independent distance indicators to them. We also took the opportunity to further improve established tools, such as the fundamental plane, using additional insights gained by the multitude of data. In combination with redshift-data, we are able to derive the peculiar motion field for a large area of the observable universe. Additionally, we provide a comparison to the peculiar motion data derived using other distance indicators.

11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18a | ESO Garching
HEG Seminar
Talk — X-ray reprocessing: Through the eclipse spectra of high and low mass X-ray binaries with XMM-NEWTON
Nafisa Aftab (Raman Research Institute, Bangalore)
03/09/18 (Monday)
13:30, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Talk
Talk — The nuclear obscurer of Active Galactic Nuclei
Johannes Buchner (PUC Chile)

August 2018

31/08/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Galactic halo planetary nebulae and symbiotic stars in multi-band photometric surveys
Luis Gutiérrez Soto (Centro de Estudios de Física del Cosmos de Aragón)

Abstract

About 3,000 planetary nebulae (PNe) and 250 symbiotic stars (SySts) are known in the Galaxy. Only 14 PNe and around 5% of the SySts are located at highGalactic latitudes. This contribution presents the preliminary results of a project aimed at to identify PNe and SySts in the direction of Galactic halo, by using the Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS), the Javalambre-Photometric Local Universe Survey (J-PLUS) and the SouthernPhotometric Local Universe Survey (S-PLUS). The main advantage of these surveys is their great combinations of narrow- and broad-band filters, in total 56,12, and 12 filters, respectively, from 3,000 to 10,000 Å. The optical spectra of several types of sources as well as a grid of PN photoionization models, convolved to the photometric systems of the three surveys, are used to generate combinations of colour-colour diagrams that discriminate halo PNe and SySts from other emission line objects (star-forming galaxies; QSOs; cataclysmic variables; extragalactic H II regions; young stellar objects; Be stars; among others). The J-PLUS science verification observations of two known halo PNe (H 1-4 and PNG 135.9+55.9) are actually located in the locus of PNe/SySts we defined in the colour-colour diagrams. New halo PN and SySt candidates, selected in the J-PLUS and S-PLUS Early Data Releases, will be discussed in this contribution.

30/08/18 (Thursday)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Seminar
Talk — Tightest bounds on primordial black hole abundance with HSC observation of M31
Hiroko Niikura (University of Tokyo)
20/08/18 (Monday)
14:00, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Talk
Talk — Witnessing the Build-Up of Distant Galaxy Clusters in the (Sub)Millimeter Regime
Helmut Dannerbauer (Instituto de Astr. de Canarias/Cluster guest)
14/08/18 (Tuesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Talk
Talk — Observing the Kinematics of Planet - Disk Interactions: A New Method for Planet Hunting
Rich Teague (University of Michigan)
08/08/18 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — The search for the oldest stars in our Galaxy
Patrick Francois (Paris-Meudon Observatory)

Abstract

The extremely metal-poor stars (EMP) hold in their atmospheres the fossil record of the chemical composition of the early phases of the Galactic evolution. The chemical analysis of such objects provides important constraints on the early chemical enrichment of the Galaxy.  EMP stars are very rare objects; to dig them out the analysis of large amounts of data is necessary. I will present how these most metal poor stars can be found and present the methods which allow to determine their chemical composition.

10:30, MPE Old Seminar Room 209 | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — UV/optical variations of AGNs
JunXian Wang (Univ. of Science, China)
07/08/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Systematic search for molecular hydrogen in a large sample of GRB spectra observed with X-shooter: The nature of high-redshift GRB DLAs
Jan Bolmer (ESO)

Abstract

Damped Lyman-alpha absorbing systems (DLAs) in the sight line ofbackground quasars and gamma-ray bursts (GRB) offer a unique way tostudy the conditions of star forming regions in high redshift galaxies.Now, for the first time, we are able to use a large and complete sample of 22 GRBsat redshift z > 2 observed with X-shooter to measure the abundances of metals,molecules, and dust, in order to study effects of metallicity, dust depletion andnucleosythesis in the high redshift interstellar medium. To do so, we developednew, state-of-the-art methods, based on the Python Bayesian inferencepackage PyMC, to fit absorption lines in order measure the columndensities of 10 different elements as well as neutral and molecular hydrogen.The measured relative abundances are further used to fit depletion sequencesand determine the dust-to-metals ratio and the host intrinsic visual extinction.In this talk, I want demonstrate our new methods, present the results, and discuss theirimplication for the nature of high-redshift GRB DLAs.

01/08/18 (Wednesday)
13:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Discussion on Planck 2018
Franz Elsner (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Near-IR: a new spectral window for furthering stellar population studies
Alexandre Vazdekis (Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias)

Abstract

So far most of what we have learned about the stellar content of Early-Type Galaxies come from the visible, particularly for detailed spectroscopic studies. New observational facilities and new modeling means allow us to start exploiting the near-IR spectral range. Good fitting solutions should work out for both the Near-IR and the optical ranges. I will show you new results, but most importantly, will discuss with you the potential of this spectral range for constraining the SFHs, IMF and abundance ratios of these galaxies.

July 2018

31/07/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The Hidden Stellar Cusp around the Milky Way’s Central MBH
Rainer Schödel (IAA-CSIC, Granada, Spain)

Abstract

A stellar cusp in a dense stellar system around a massive black hole is a firm prediction of stellar dynamics. Nevertheless, observational evidence from the nuclear cluster of the Milky Way appeared to contradict the theoretical expectations. In this talk we will review the topic and present the latest observational work that provides evidence, from multiple tracers, that the cusp exists.  Its existence implies that we can expect to observe a significant amount of EMRIs with future space based gravitational wave observatories. We confirm previous findings that the cusp is not observed in the bright giants. The “missing cusp” problem is thus a “hidden cusp” problem and some mechanism must have altered the appearance of the giants near  Sagittarius A*.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Shining a light on dark matter
Jabran Zahid (CfA Harvard)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — A renormalized perturbative expansion for intrinsic alignments
Denise Schmitz (Caltech)
27/07/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Metrics for Deep Generative Models
Patrick van der Smagt (AI Research, Data:Lab, VW)
11:00, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Lecture
Talk — Magnetic fields in the early universe
Kandaswamy Subramanian (IUCAA Pune, India)
26/07/18 (Thursday)
16:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The S2 peri-passage - general relativistic effects in stellar orbits around the Galactic Center black hole
Frank Eisenhauer (Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik)

Abstract

The Galactic Center offers the unique possibility to quantitatively test general relativity in the so-far unexplored regime close to a massive black hole. Here we present the latest results from the peri-passage of the star S2 in May 2018. As the star approached the black hole as close as 17 light hours and a speed of almost 8000 km/s, we have followed its orbit with SINFONI spectroscopy and GRAVITY interferometry at the ESO Very Large Telescopes. The GRAVITY instrument, which we have developed specifically for the observations of the Galactic Center black hole and its orbiting stars, is now routinely achieving ~3 milli-arcsec imaging interferometry and with a sensitivity several hundred times better than previous instruments. Its astrometric precision of few ten micro-arcseconds corresponds to only few Schwarzschild radii of Galactic Center massive black hole. The door is now wide open for the quantitative analysis and interpretation of the fundamentals of gravity, all the way from the underlying equivalence principles, to considerations on new physics and their characteristic scales and strengths. The Galactic Center is and will remain the Rosetta-stone for deciphering strong gravity around massive black holes.

11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
Seminar Excellence Cluster 'Universe'
Talk — Hydrodynamic simulations of superbubbles
Martin Krause (Univ. of Hertfordshire)
25/07/18 (Wednesday)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
SESTAS
Talk — Chemodynamical simulations of the Milky Way for constraining hypernovae and kilonovae
Chiaki Kobayashi (Univ. of Hertfordshire)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Testing Type Ia supernova explosion models with bulk properties of supernova remnants
Hector Martínez-Rodríguez (University of Pittsburgh)

Abstract

Type Ia supernovae originate from the explosion of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs in binary systems,but the exact nature of their progenitors remains elusive. Recent studies have found that theX-ray bulk properties of Type Ia supernova remnants, such as the radius and the Fe Kalpha centroid energy and luminosity, can discriminate between progenitor energetics and circumstellar environments.Using Chandrasekhar, and for the first time, sub-Chandrasekhar models for the chemical composition of Type Ia supernova ejecta, we model the dynamical and thermal evolution of supernova remnants up to 5000 years for several uniform ambient media in one dimension. We generate synthetic X-ray spectra from these models with updated atomic data and compare these bulk properties for different expansion ages with X-ray observations from the Chandra and Suzaku telescopes. We find an overall agreement between our models and the observational data. We also find that the ambient medium density and the expansion age are the main contributors to the X-ray diversity of these bulk properties, not the progenitor scenario. Detailed X-ray fittings that determine chemical abundances or flux ratios are needed to discriminate between Chandrasekhar and sub-Chandrasekhar progenitor scenarios.

24/07/18 (Tuesday)
17:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Career Seminar
Talk — Digitalization and Data Analytics for the Production of Electric Powertrains at BMW
Zazralt Magic (BMW)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Ion beam therapy: state-of-the-art and research opportunities
Katia Parodi (LMU)
14:00, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Lecture
Talk — Magnetizing the universe II: The large scale dynamos
Kandaswamy Subramanian (IUCAA Pune, India)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Indiana Jones and where to find galaxy relics
Fernando Buitrago (Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Lisbon)

Abstract

There are massive galaxies that remain untouched since the high-z Universe. These objects, the so-called relic galaxies, are massive (M_stellar > 8x10^10 M_Sun), very small (effective radius < 2 kpc) and display old (>10 Gyr) stellar populations (thus being red nuggets but at low-z!). For the very few of them already found and analysed, they seem to host übermassive black holes, to show a bottom-heavy IMF and to retain early disk morphologies and kinematics. How did they survive until the present day? Simulations predict that they live in galaxy overdensities whose large velocity dispersions prevent galaxies from merging. However, we have not yet determined observationally neither the environments these galaxies inhabit nor their number densities. The large area and spectroscopic completeness of the GAMA survey allows us to conduct a complete census of this elusive galaxy population, and also to analyse their structural parameters. After inspecting ~150 deg^2 of ancillary KiDS and VIKING photometric data, we have identified 21 of these objects at 0.02 < z < 0.3, that are true windows to the primeval Universe. I will present the first paper introducing this exceptional sample, describing its properties and highlighting the fact that while some of galaxies seem to be satellites of bigger objects, others live in the field, at odds with the theoretical expectations.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — The Role of Stellar Feedback in Star Cluster Formation
Mike Grudic (Caltech)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — (topic to be announced)
Long Wang (MPA)
23/07/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The Landscape of Neutrino-Driven Supernovae: Explodability, Remnants, and SN yields
Thomas Ertl (MPA)
13:30, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Lecture
Talk — Magnetizing the Universe I: Fluctuation dynamos
Kandaswamy Subramanian (IUCAA Pune, India)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Colloquium
Talk — The New Horizons Exploration of Pluto
Tod Lauer (NOAO, Tucson, AZ)
20/07/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Useful Tools and Programs for Spectroscopy
Sara Mancino & Riano Escate Giribaldi (ESO)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO Talk
Talk — Passive galaxies census at z~3
Chiara D'Eugenio (CEA Saclay)
19/07/18 (Thursday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
Special Universe Talk
Talk — Antimatter in the Milky Way: A theoretical perspective
Fiona Panther (Australian National Univ.)
11:00, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Universe Talk
Talk — ALMA view of a massive spheroid progenitor: a compact rotating core of molecular gas in an AGN host at z=2.226
Margherita Talia (Univ.of Bologna)
18/07/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — High spectral resolution observations of the [C II] and [13C II] 158 μm cooling line of the star forming ISM: surprisingly high optical depth
Juergen Stutzki (Uni Koeln)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — MOND: how it works, what actually works, and what really doesn't work
Federico Lelli (ESO)

Abstract

Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) is an alternative to non-baryonic dark matter, proposed by Israeli physicist Moti Milgrom in 1983. It aims to explain the mass discrepancies observed in the Universe by changing the laws of dynamics instead of postulating new particles. MOND is a general paradigm that includes different physical theories, such as modified gravity and modified inertia. I will start with a brief review of the general paradigm and its predictions. If time allows, I will also illustrate some non-relativistic MOND theories and possible relativistic extensions. In general, MOND is successful on galaxy scales, it has problems on galaxy cluster scales, and it's almost entirely mute on cosmological scales (CMB, large scale structure). In this regard, MOND is diametrically opposed to LCDM in terms of explaining/predicting power, so it is generally difficult to properly compare the two paradigms.

17/07/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — A new turbulence-regulated star formation law
Diane Salim (Australian National University)

Abstract

We present a new universal star formation law based on the probability density function (PDF) and sonic Mach number of the turbulence in star-forming clouds. In our relation the star formation rate (SFR) correlates with the molecular gas mass per multi-freefall time. We show that the actual SFR is only about 0.45% of the maximum possible SFR, confirming the observed low efficiency of star formation. We show that placing observations in the framework of our developed relation yields a significantly improved correlation with 3-4 times reduced scatter compared to previous star formation relations, such as the Kennicutt-Schmidt or the Krumholz-Dekel-McKee relation. We use this new relation to develop a new method for estimating the column density of cold molecular gas (Σgas) using integral field spectroscopy. We utilise the spatially resolved Hα maps of flux and velocity dispersion from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey to make our estimates. Finally, we present and utilise data from the Combined Array from Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) and Herschel Space Telescope to measure the star formation efficiency across the face-on Hickson Compact Group galaxy NCG7214. We find that this galaxy is extremely inefficient and cannot be described by star formation relations developed in previous literature. We therefore extend our multi-freefall star formation relation to take into account the virial parameter of the turbulent clouds, which yields significantly improved predictions of the SFR compared to any previous star formation law.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Young LMC clusters: the role of red supergiants and multiple stellar populations in their integrated light and CMDs
Randa Asa'd (American Uni of Sharjah)
16/07/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The Complexity of the Dark Matter Sheet
Jens Stuecker (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — Extreme excitation in high redshift galaxies: APEX and ALMA observations of the Atomic Carbon (CI) and Carbon monoxide (CO) emission lines
Paola Andreani (ESO)

Abstract

The study of the CI in the nearby Universe and at high redshifts has shown that CI is a very powerful tracer of the molecular gas in the galaxy interstellar medium and starts giving an advantage at z>0.5 because it remains well excited for cooler lower density molecular gas and it is optically thin (no need of the XCO factor).
When coupled with high-J CO emission lines the ratio, high-J CO/CI, is a good proxy of (warm, dense, star-forming (SF) gas)/(total H2 gas) mass fraction and provides a unique insight on the main source heating the gas and therefore indicating whether a system is merger driven or disc-like.
I show observations of three lensed galaxies at z~3  obtained with the APEX/SEPIA5 receiver and a few ALMA observations towards high-z submm galaxies and derive conclusions on the dominant power source of the molecular ISM of these objects.

10:30, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Colloquium
Talk — Everything you wanted to know about the multi-messenger press conference held on July 12
Paolo Padovani (ESO)
10:30, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Colloquium
Talk — The birth of non-stellar neutrino astronomy
Elisa Resconi (TUM)
13/07/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Galaxy Cluster Discussion Group
Talk — LoCuSS: galaxy properties in and around massive galaxy clusters at z=0.2
Matteo Bianconi (Birmingham University)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Talk
Talk — Massive AGN-driven winds in post starburst E+A galaxies
Dalya Baron (Tel Aviv Univ.)
10:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Talk
Talk — Large area X-ray surveys. eROSITA selection function and current stand of SPIDERS cluster survey
Nicolas Clerc (IRAP, EC guest)
12/07/18 (Thursday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
10:30, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Talk
Talk — Pulsational Pair Instability Supernovae
Shing-Chi Leung (IPMU/Kavli Inst.)
11/07/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, MPQ, Lecture Hall, Room B 0.32 | ESO Garching
Special IMPRS-QST Career Talk
Talk — Postdoc opportunities in the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation’s global network
Enno Aufderheide (Secretary General of AvH)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Mining and mapping the first generations of stars with the Pristine Ca H&K survey
Nicolas Martin (Obs. Astron. de Strasbourg)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — The Local Cluster Survey: Shrinking Disks of Star Formation in Nearby Galaxy Clusters
Gregory Rudnick (University of Kansas)

Abstract

It is now well established that the star formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies are reduced by their passage through a dense environment.  However, the processes responsible for this suppression are uncertain, as are the timescales over which they act.  Some observational constraints have provided evidence for fast (<~ 500 Myr) suppression while others support a long timescale (2-5 Gyr).  A successful model for resolving this discrepancy is a “delay+rapid” quenching model, in which galaxies enter a cluster and are unaffected for a period of time, the “delay” period, followed by a rapid quenching event.  While this model is successful at explaining many aspects of quenching in clusters, it is unknown what happens to galaxies in the “delay” period.  I will discuss a set of completed and in prep. papers from the Local Cluster Survey that address this issue. We use spatially resolved observations of star formation tracers in star-forming galaxies in 9 nearby clusters to understand how the star-forming disks of cluster galaxies are affected by their environment.  We find that spatially resolving the star formation is a crucial ingredient to understanding environmental transformation and I will present our results on the relative size and shrinking timescales of star-forming disks inside and outside the clusters.  I will also discuss the implication that this has for understanding how the spatially integrated SFRs of galaxies are modified as they enter dense environments.

10/07/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Origin and Nature of Neutrino Mass
Goran Senjanovic (ICTP)
15:30, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Talk
Talk — Galaxy evolution results from Hubble’s WISP survey
Claudia Scarlata (Univ. of Minnesota, USA)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Astronomy Development in Ghana: ESO-ART Effect
Bernard Duah Asabere (Ghana Radio Astronomy Observatory (AVN Ghana))

Abstract

Africa is becoming a focus of the world's radio astronomy community. Evidently, South Africa is unveiling the 64-antenna MeerKAT Radio Telescope, the African's precursor to the world's next generation radio telescope, the SKA, on July 13, 2018 at the SKA Losberg site in the Karoo. It is envisaged that the SKA Phase 2 will have arrays extended to the eight SKA African Partner Countries that include Ghana. Prior to this, African VLBI Network (AVN) is being built with the converted and refurbished 32m satellite communication earth station antenna now at the Ghana Radio Astronomy Observatory (GRAO), as the first non-South African radio telescope of the AVN. This facility was commissioned at Kuntunse near Accra on August 24, 2017 as a functional radio astronomy telescope. The strategic location of the Ghana's 32m radio telescope of 5 degrees north of the Equator is attracting much interests especially in the global VLBI community in terms of spatial resolution contributions. Motivated by these developments, we aim at building a strong and vibrant Ghanaian research community in this area to operate and exploit the radio telescope in Ghana, the AVN, the SKA and other global astronomy instruments. In pursuit of this, research and development links are being established globally with pioneers in the field. The enthusiastic and interested young Ghanaian students and researchers are waiting to embrace opportunities to build carriers in this merging field in the country. The UK was first to heed to this call with the Development in Africa with Radio Astronomy (DARA) astronomy training programme with funding from the Royal Society and more recently by its Newton Fund. The DARA programme is highlighting the potential overlaps between the skills required for radio astronomy and those in related industries such as space science, satellite communications, telecommunications and big data applications. ESO joined the race last year with an outreach programme dubbed ESO-ART, which has had great impact on astronomy development in Ghana, and Sweden will probably move in soon.

In this presentation, I will speak about astronomy development in Ghana, the successes chopped so far and the way forward. I will as well, outline opportunities for research and development brought about by the emergence of astronomy in Ghana, and emphasize the impact of ESO-ART in Ghana's astronomy development drives.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Bounds on Graviton mass using weak lensing and SZ effect in Galaxy clusters
Akshay Rana (University of Delhi)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Cosmological Reconstruction from LSS Observable: Neural Network based Light-Matter Connection
Chirag Modi (UC Berkeley)
09/07/18 (Monday)
17:15, HS2, Physik TUM Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — PicoPhotonics: Extreme nano-optics with single molecules and monolayers
Jeremy Baumberg (Cavendish Lab., Cambridge)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Meteorology for galaxy clusters
Xun Shi (MPA)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Talk
Talk — Stellar disc streams as probes of the Galactic potential and past perturbations
Chervin Laporte (Columbia Univ.)
06/07/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — 3D Reconstruction and Understanding of the Real World
Matthias Niessner (TUM)
11:30, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
Special USM Talk
Talk — Gradients of Velocity and Synchrotron Technique: game changers for magnetic field observational studies
Alexandre Lazarian (Univ. of Wisconsin)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Talk
Talk — Finding simple structures in complex astronomical datasets
Dalya Baron (Tel Aviv University)
05/07/18 (Thursday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
04/07/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Science with the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)
Bernhard Schulz (Deutsches SOFIA Inst.)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — The slow change of paradigm in globular cluster formation
Ivan Cabrera Ziri Castro (CfA, Harvard)

Abstract

Every globular cluster (GC) host stars with different light element abundances. These can be broadly classified in two populations: the first population (P1) has the same abundance as field stars of similar [Fe/H], while a second population (P2) shows abundance variations of some specific light elements like He, C, N, O, Na, Al and Mg. Here I’ll introduce the main idea behind the origin of the anomalous abundances of GC stars, and the challenges they face in the light of new evidence that have come up in the last two years.

03/07/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Nonequilibrium physics to drive the chemistry of early Life
Dieter Braun (LMU)
14:00, MPE Old Seminar Room 209 | ESO Garching
MPE Talk
Talk — The Taipan Survey
Jeremy Mould (Swinburne Univ.)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The Wide Field Upgrade of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, its new instrumentation, and early science
Gary Hill (University of Texas at Austin)

Abstract

The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an innovative VLT, located at the McDonald Observatory. We have completed a major upgrade of the HET that has increased the pupil size to 10 meters and the field of view to 22 arcminutes by replacing the corrector, tracker, and prime focus instrument package. The wide field HET feeds a suite of four new and upgraded instruments, including the revolutionary integral field spectrograph, VIRUS, in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The HET Wide Field Upgrade has now been commissioned and is back in full science operations since mid 2016. I will discuss the upgrade, VIRUS and the other new instrumentation, and briefly present some early science results.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Superfluid Dark Matter
Lasha Berezhiani (MPP)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — A measurement of the complete set of third-order halo bias parameters
Titouan Lazeyras (MPA)
02/07/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Deep X: Deep Learning with Deep Knowledge
Volker Tresp (LMU & Siemens)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Morphology of Reionisation and Large Scale Structure
Philipp Busch (MPA)

June 2018

29/06/18 (Friday)
14:00, Room 313, MPP, Foehringer Ring 6, Munich | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Adaptive Harmonic Mean Integration and Application to Evidence Calculation
Rafael Schick (TUM & MPP)
28/06/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Cosmological anisotropies
John Webb (UNSW Sydney)
Download video |

Abstract

The talk will be delivered in two parts.  The first will summarise recent work on searches for any possible space-time variations in fundamental constants. Whilst results to date are suggestive (but inconclusive), the prospects for significantly improving existing measurements are good. We are about half-way through a large survey aimed at making the first 1000 high redshift measurements of the fine structure constant. The target timescale for completion is 2 years.We are also pushing to the highest possible redshifts with a smaller sample of quasars around z=6-7. I will discuss new results from that study.

The second half of the talk will focus on other aspects of cosmological anisotropy. In particular, I will describe a detailed exploration of the statistical properties of the Lyman alpha forest transmission using the SDSS survey. The results are surprising. Huge coherent structures in the HI distribution appear in the data over cosmological scales. The Cosmological Principle appears to reduce to an approximation on scales comparable to the Hubble length.

Video

Loading the player...
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Lectures
Talk — Gravitational Waves from Inflation
Azadeh Maleknejad (MPA)
27/06/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — HI in IllustrisTNG and Dark Sage galaxies
Adam Stevens (Univ. of Perth) (Univ. of Perth)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Astronomy that can make you throw up
Hans-Ulrich Käufl (ESO)

Abstract

Almost forgotten, in the era of GPS/GLONASS/GALILEO, the art of astronomical navigation is still being practiced. I will introduce the tools: the sextant, the "Nautical Almanach", paper, preferably with polar coordinates and pocket calculator, a slide rule could do as well.

Starting from posing the problem, say how to sail from Tenerife to the Caribic, beauty and pitfalls of working with the sextant will be explained, including the artificial horizon. The measured altitude of celestial bodies then needs to be converted into crossing bearing lines. This leads to the graphic solution introduced as late as 1875 by French navy captain Marcq Saint-Hilaire. The method, btw. is a master piece how to design a highly efficient and numerically stable algorithm.

As a side issue, time permitting, the astronomical correction of the magnetic compass will shortly be touched.

26/06/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Cosmology as a laboratory for probing neutrinos and other light particles - CANCELLED
Steen Hannestad (Aarhus University)
15:00, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Lecture
Talk — Implications of the Infrared Physics in Gravity for Amplitudes and Black Holes
Cesar Gomez (Autonoma Univ. Madrid, Spain)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Radially extended kinematic and dynamical analyses of early-type galaxies using the SLUGGS Survey
Sabine Bellstedt (Swinburne University)

Abstract

The potential formation scenarios of early-type galaxies are very varied, from violent merger histories, to secular quenching scenarios. We use extended stellar kinematics (to ~4 effective radii) for ~25 galaxies from the SLUGGS Survey in an attempt to disentangle the effects of these histories on the kinematics of early-type galaxies. Additionally, we conduct JAM dynamical modelling using both radially-extended SLUGGS and central ATLAS3D data to construct the total-mass density profiles for these galaxies. A comparison of these results not only to other observations but also to the EAGLE and Magneticum simulations will be presented, to better understand the processes that are governing mass distributions in early-type galaxies.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — HI in IllustrisTNG and Dark Sage galaxies
Adam Stevens (Univ. of Perth)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — GRB and blazar jets shining through their stripes
Dimitrios Giannios (Purdue Univ., USA)
10:00, Pavo (ESO room A.2.01) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — The Serpens filament: at the onset of slightly supercritical collapse
Yan Gong (MPIfR)

Abstract

The Serpens filament, as one of the nearest infrared dark clouds, is regarded as a pristine filament at a very early evolutionary stage of star formation. In order to study its molecular content and dynamical state, we mapped this filament in seven species including C18O, HCO+, HNC, HCN, N2H+, CS, and CH3OH. Among them, HCO+, HNC, HCN, and CS show self-absorption, while C18O is most sensitive to the filamentary structure. A kinematic analysis demonstrates that this filament forms a velocity-coherent (trans-)sonic structure, a large part of which is one of the most quiescent regions in the Serpens cloud. Widespread C18O depletion is found throughout the Serpens filament. Based on the Herschel dust-derived H$_{2}$ column density map, the line mass of the filament is 41±5Msun/pc, and its full width at half maximum width is 0.17±0.01 pc, while its length is ~1.6 pc. The inner radial column density profile of this filament can be well fitted with a Plummer profile with an exponent of 3.0±0.2, a scale radius of 0.037±0.002 pc, and a central density of (2.2± 0.1)e4 cm^{-3}. The Serpens filament appears to be slightly supercritical. The widespread blue-skewed HNC and CS line profiles and HCN hyperfine line anomalies across this filament indicate radial collapse in parts of the Serpens filament. C18O velocity gradients also indicate accretion flows along the filament. The velocity and density structures suggest that such accretion flows are likely due to the longitudinal collapse. Both the infall rate (~72 Msun/Myr, inferred from HNC and CS blue-skewed profiles) and the accretion rate (~10 Msun/Myr, inferred from C18O velocity gradients) along the Serpens filament are lower than all previously reported values in other filaments, indicating an earlier evolutionary stage.

25/06/18 (Monday)
17:15, HS2, Physik TUM Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — High-temperature superconductivity: new insights and perspectives
Bernhard Keimer (MPI f. Festkoerperforschung)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Exploring the formation history of the Milky Way using dynamics and stellar populations
Francesca Fragkoudi (MPA)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18a | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — The formation of complex organics in dense clouds - sweet results from the laboratory
Ko-Ju Chuang (Leiden University)
22/06/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — A Mira Distance to Megamaser-Host Galaxy NGC 4258
Caroline Huang (Johns Hopkins University)

Abstract

The value of the Hubble constant, the present expansion rate of the Universe, remains a source of great interest in astrophysics today. The improved precision in local H0 measurements has revealed a 3.4σ discrepancy with the value inferred from observations of the cosmic microwave background under the assumption of a ΛCDM cosmology. The most precise local measurements of H0 currently rely on Cepheid variables to calibrate nearby Type-Ia supernovae. However, as Population II distance indicators, short-period, O-rich Mira variables can serve as a check to Cepheids while simultaneously increasing the local calibrating SN Ia sample. In this talk, I will present the results of a year-long, near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope observation of Mira variables in the megamaser host galaxy NGC 4258. I will discuss the process of discovering and characterizing Mira variables in the NIR for use as distance indicators.

21/06/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The Stellar Halos of Nearby Early-type Galaxies: Highlights from the SLUGGS survey
Duncan Forbes (Swinburne University, Melbourne)
Download video |

Abstract

Using images from Subaru and spectroscopy from Keck, the SLUGGS surveyaims to understand the formation and evolution of massive early-typegalaxies. For a sample of 25 galaxies, we probe the detailedkinematics and metallicities of their field stars to 3-4 effectiveradii and their globular clusters to 8-15 effective radii. From thesedata we have derived 2D maps of the halo stellar kinematics andmetallicity. We find changing kinematic signatures as we probe fromthe galaxy inner to halo regions.  Using JAM models we have derivedthe mass density slope and compare it to the latest cosmologicalsimulations. The SLUGGS survey has also collected over 4000 globularcluster radial velocities (the largest sample to date). From this datawe have derived the dynamical mass and dark matter fractions for ourgalaxies. We compare our results with the latest predictions from theIllustris simulations. We also explore the kinematics and scalingrelations of globular cluster systems. These results are placed in thecontext of two-phase galaxy formation. And if time allows, I willbriefly mention recent work on ultra-diffuse galaxies using the Kecktelescope.

Video

Loading the player...
20/06/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Constraining Cosmology with Cosmic Voids
Adam Hawken (CPPM, Marseille)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — How relevant are galaxy mergers for driving AGN activity?
Lisa Steinborn (USM)

Abstract

Which mechanisms are mainly driving AGN activity is a major unsettled question. Thereby, the role of galaxy mergers is heavily debated, from both an observational as well as from a theoretical point of view. I will discuss different contradictory observational and theoretical results and present a study in which we investigated the statistical relevance of galaxy mergers for driving AGN activity, using large-scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations from the Magneticum Pathfinder set. Our simulations predict that for luminous AGN at z=2, more than 50 per cent of their host galaxies have experienced a merger in the last 0.5 Gyr, consistent with a number of observational studies. These high merger fractions, however, merely reflect the intrinsically high merger rates of massive galaxies at z=2, in which luminous AGN preferentially occur. Apart from that, our simulations suggest that merger events are not the statistically dominant fuelling mechanism for nuclear activity over a redshift range z=0-2. Despite the statistically minor relevance of mergers, at a given AGN luminosity and stellar mass, the merger rates of AGN hosts can be up to three times higher than that of inactive galaxies. Such elevated merger rates still point towards an intrinsic connection between AGN activity and mergers, consistent with our traditional expectation.

19/06/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Dark matter revealed by the first stars?
Rennan Barkana (Tel Aviv Univ.)
16:00, MPE room III X2 209 | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — What Controls the Rate of Star Formation: Common Features and Common Myths
Neal Evans (University of Texas at Austin)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — In disguise or out of reach?: First clues about in-situ and accreted stars in the stellar halo of the Milky Way from Gaia DR2
Misha Haywood (Obs de Paris)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Mergers, tidal interactions, and mass exchange in a population of disc globular clusters
Paola Di Matteo (Obs de Paris)
10:00, ESO room Grus (A.3.40) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Planet Formation by Pictures
Zahed Wahhaj (ESO)

Abstract

Over the past few years, there has been enormous advances in understanding planet formation. The advent of extreme adaptive optics instruments, like SPHERE and GPI, produced a plethora of images of circumstellar disks in the act of producing planets.In this review, I take stock of what we have learned in recent years about

1) the mass budget available to make planets within10au from their host star and debris disks beyond 20au,

2) the directly imaged planets discovered beyond 10 au,

3) the shapes of debris disks resolved so far

4) the photometry of debris disks as a population

5) the rings and spirals in young circumstellar disks imaged with SPHERE and ALMA.

18/06/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — From Dust Storms on Mars to Streaming in Protoplanetary Disks
Gerhard Wurm (Univ. Duisburg-Essen)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Magnetic instabilities and dynamo action in stably stratified stellar interiors
Domenico Meduri (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Talk — Learning the (other) worlds 2.0
Valentin Ivanov (ESO)
View slides |

Abstract

I will review the history of the exoplanet research, the latest results, and will summarize the most important questions that have remained unanswered.

09:30, MPA room 006 | ESO Garching
13/06/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Cosmological Constraints with Current and Future Type Ia Supernovae
Suhail Dhawan (OKC Stockholm)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
SESTAS
Talk — Circumbinary discs around post-AGB stars
Robert Izzard (Univ. of Surrey)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — What is this thing called Science? An Assessment of the Nature and Status of Science and Its Methods.
Jérémy Fensch (ESO)

Abstract

The current epoch holds science in high esteem. The belief that science and its methods have something particular seems to be very much shared. Qualifying a statement or a reasoning as scientific gives it sort of a merit or shows that we give it a particular trust. But, if science has something particular, what is it then?

(‘What is this thing called Science?’, Alan Chalmers, my translation)

To try and grasp the subtlety of this question, I will present and discuss the basis of three different science philosophies, which all have had a tremendous impact on how people considered the scientific activity at the time:

1/ ‘Induction’ promulgated by Sir Francis Bacon, the first modern science philosopher.

2/ ‘Falsificationism’, created by Sir Karl Popper to attack induction.

3/ I will conclude by presenting the structuralist theory of science by Thomas Kuhn, who created and popularized the now widely used term ‘paradigm shift’.

12/06/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Searching for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo with lithium molybdate scintillating bolometers
Andrea Giuliani (CSNSM, Paris-Saclay)
13:00, MPE room III X2 209 | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — What have I learned from ALMA
Giuseppe Lodato (Universitá degli Studi di Milano)

Abstract

Recent ALMA observations are revolutionizing our understanding of protostellar disc appearance and evolution. This revolution is twofold: one the one hand, large and deep surveys are providing us with estimates of the main physical properties (such as dust mass and disc radii) of large homogeneous samples of discs; on the other hand, high resolution observations of individual discs are showing a completely unexpected richness in disc morphologies, including rings, spirals, horseshoes, cavities and shadowing effects. In this talk, I will show how can we model the observed properties of large disc samples (such as the Lupus and Chamaleon samples) in terms of simple disc population synthesis models, based on the simplest viscous evolutionary models available. At the same time, I will discuss how to reconcile the success of such simplified models (based on axisymmetric, power-law disc profiles in density, temperature and viscosity) with the apparent complexity of the observed morphology in individual sources.

12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The halo model for the baryonic universe: through reionization and later
Hamsa Padmanabhan (ETH Zurich)

Abstract

The evolution of baryonic gas across redshifts is a powerful probe of several aspects of cosmology, galaxy formation and the epoch of reionization. Using a data-driven halo model to describe the distribution of neutral hydrogen (HI) in the post-reionization universe(z ~ 5 to 0), we obtain the best-fitting parameters from a rich sample of observational data: low redshift 21-cm emission line studies,intermediate redshift intensity mapping experiments, and higher redshift Damped Lyman Alpha (DLA) observations. Our model describes the abundance and clustering of neutral hydrogen across redshifts 0 - 5, and can be used to investigate several aspects of galaxy formation. I will describe extensions to the formalism for probing molecular gas at moderate redshifts and the epoch of reionization.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Forward modelling strong lensing substructure to probe dark matter
Simon Birrer (UCLA)
11:00, MPE Old Seminar Room 209 | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — Galactic-scale correlated star formation
Yusuke Fujimoto (ANU, Canberra)
11/06/18 (Monday)
17:15, HS2, Physik TUM Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — When Physics Meet Medicine: Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Cancer for Precision Oncology
Richard Baum (Zentralklinik Bad Berka)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special MPA Colloquium
Talk — Stellar Ages and Galactic Evolution
Saskia Hekker (MPI f. Solar System)
08/06/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Help, please: What's this star doing?
Dietrich Baade (ESO)

Abstract

ν Pup is a 3rd-magnitude B8 IVe star. Spectroscopy has revealed two shell phases in a century, suggesting that the circumstellar disk, where the emission lines form, is viewed edge on but absent much of the time.

Photometry with the Hipparcos, SMEI, and BRITE satellites has found a persistent non-sinusoidal variability with period 1.52 d and semi-amplitude of 0.01-0.02 mag. Regular radial-velocity variations, if any, have an amplitude of no more than a few km/s on all relevant timescales.

The spectrum does not exhibit any pecularities, a magnetic field was not detected, and there is no indication of a companion star.

The 1.52-d period doesn't seem to be perfectly constant. In fact, the times of photometric maxima are periodically shifted back and forth by ±0.2 d with a period of 479 d. When folded with 479 d, the amplitude of the 1.52-d variability exhibits a double-wave modulation with unequal halfwaves.

1.52 and 479 are numerically unrelated (except that their ratio is 100.00065 π ...).

So far, so simple. However, we (DB, Thomas Rivinius / Paranal, Andrzej Pigulski / Wrocław, Despina Panoglou / Rio de Janeiro, and others) are struggling to put all facts under the common umbrella even of a simple toy model.

Therefore, after a brief introductory recap of the above facts, I’d like to use the meeting for a joint brain-storming exercise, hoping that your collective pressing our reset buttons can help us make progress. Many thanks in advance if you can come - if you can suggest a more convincing solution than the one that I’ll somewhat reluctantly present at the end, you’ll be invited to join the project as co-author.

12:00, MPA room 006 | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Origins of the RNA world: the fate of nucleobases in warm little ponds
Ralf Pudritz (McMaster University)
07/06/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Periodic and transient phenomena with the Gaia mission
Laurent Eyer (Observatoire de Genève)
Download video |

Video

Loading the player...
06/06/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Testing Cold Dark Matter on Galaxy Scales with the H I Velocity Function
Aaron Dutton (New York Univ.)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — To Ditch, or not to Ditch (the FITS): The File Format Dilemma in Astronomy
Bernie Boscoe (UCLA)

Abstract

The governance of file formats, protocols, and standards has recently emerged as a site of interest for both computer science and social science. Governed by an International Astronomy Union working group since 1982, over the last four decades, the FITS file format has become the de facto standard for sharing, analyzing and archiving astronomy data. FITS was widely adopted by the astronomical polity in the early 1980’s because of its ability to overcome the problem of incompatibilities between operating systems. Using the FITS format, an astronomer could share image files across operating systems using FITS as a common substrate. On the back of the original intent of FITS, astronomical data became both backwards compatible and easily shared.


However, new advances in astronomy instrumentation, computational technologies and analytic techniques have resulted in new data that do not work well within the traditional FITS format. Tensions have arisen between the desire to update the format to meet new data and analytic challenges and adherence to the original edict for FITS files to be backwards-compatible. The future of FITS is caught between the demands of rapidly changing technology and the insistence upon the stability of a rarely-changed format. We examine three inflection points in the governance of FITS: a) initial development and success, b) widespread acceptance and governance by the working group, and c) the challenges to FITS in a new era of increasing data and computational complexity within astronomy.

05/06/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Evolved Planetary Systems
Eva Villaver (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)

Abstract

Planet host stars,  the Sun among them, will eventually evolve into giants to finally end their lives as white dwarfs. Planets will be engulfed along the giant phases, evaporated during the Planetary Nebula phase, and possibly destabilized when the star enters the white dwarf cooling track. A large number of  planets will eventually be destroyed and all  orbital configurations on the main sequences will be modified. Furthermore, the  planet surface conditions of those planets that survive are expected to change as well as the result of the evolution of the star.

I will discuss the limits that the theoretical studies allow us to set on the survival and habitability of planets as the star runs out of its hydrogen fuel. Finally, I will summarize the consequences that the presence and destruction of these Extreme Solar systems have in the evolution of stars.

12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Chemistry among the stars and the clouds: molecular processes in the interstellar medium
Franco Gianturco (Univ. of Innsbruck)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Kinematics of lensed galaxies with a 3D Bayesian model
Francesca Rizzo (MPA)
04/06/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — High-contrast observations of extrasolar planets and protoplanetary disks
Sascha Quanz (ETH Zuerich)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — A brief history of reionization - the unknown first billion years in minutes
Marius Eide (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Paola Andreani (ESO)

Abstract

Physicists believe they have made a huge progress in the concept of time since they have imported its ‘meaning’ into physics from the philosophers in the XVII century.

We understand time dilation in special and general relativity but still we have advanced enough in the notion of time-flow and the meaning of ‘present’.

I will introduce the nowadays hot debate among theoretical physicists according to which time has either disappeared from the equations, like in quantum gravity, or has become ‘fundamental and real’ and we need to re-write the physical laws.

In this last case: what if the the laws of physics were not timeless? What if they could evolve?

01/06/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — On the Confluence of Deep Learning and Proximal Methods
Daniel Cremers (TUM)

May 2018

30/05/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — EDRS2: An Update of Echelle Spectra Reduction Package for FOCES Evolution in Wendelstein
Liang Wang (LMU- Wendelstein)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Thermal-chemical processes in circumstellar disk atmospheres
Máté Ádámkovics (Clemson University)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Characterizing the local double white dwarf population
Na’ama Hallakoun (Tel Aviv University)

Abstract

The characterization of the local double white dwarf (DWD) population is crucial to our understanding of multiple questions, from stellar evolution, through the progenitors of Type-Ia supernovae, to gravitational wave sources. From a spectroscopic sample of 439 WDs from the ESO-SPY survey, we measure the maximal changes in radial-velocity (DRVmax) between epochs, and model the observed DRVmax statistics via Monte-Carlo simulations, to constrain the population characteristics of DWDs. We then combine the results with those of a complementary sample from the SDSS to obtain new and precise information on the DWD population and on its gravitational-wave-driven merger rate. We find that ~10% of WDs are in DWD systems in the separation range ~<4AU within which the data are sensitive to binarity. The Galactic WD merger rate per WD is ~1e-11 per year. Integrated over the Galaxy lifetime, this implies that 8.5-11% of all WDs ever formed have merged with another WD. If most DWD mergers end as more-massive WDs, then some ~10% of WDs are DWD-merger products, consistent with the observed fraction of WDs in the 'high-mass bump' in the WD mass function, now possibly seen in Gaia DR2. The implied Galactic DWD merger rate is 4.5-7 times the Milky Way's specific type-Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate. If most SN Ia explosions come about from the mergers of some DWDs then ~15% of all WD mergers must lead to a SN Ia.

29/05/18 (Tuesday)
17:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
TUM - 150 Jahre
Talk — Asteroiden - Gefahr oder Chance?
Detlef Koschny (ESA/TUM)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Axions as Dark Matter?
Zoltan Fodor (Uni Wuppertal)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The remarkable life and death of the massive stars
Marco Limongi (INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma)

Abstract

Massive stars, by which we mean those stars evolving through all the stable nuclear burning stages and eventually exploding as core collapse supernovae,play a fundamental role in the evolution of the Universe. In particular, a good knowledge of their evolution is required in order to shed light on many topical subjectslike the chemical evolution of the Universe, the UV outputs of the first stars, the properties of the Galactic and the Magellanic Clouds Wolf-Rayet stars, the origin of the Extremely Metal Poor stars, the final fate of massive stars and how they explode as core collapse supernovae of different types, the nature of the progenitors of the long Gamma Ray Bursts, the nature of the sources of gravitational waves.

In this talk I will review our current understanding of the life and death of massive stars, their contribution to the chemical evolution of the Universe and the nature of their remnants as a function of the initial mass, metallicity and rotation velocity.

28/05/18 (Monday)
17:15, HS2, Physik TUM Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Emil J. Gumbel: Weimar pacifist and founder of the statistical theory of extremes
Matthias Scherer (TUM)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Responses in and on Large Scale Structure
Alexandre Barreira (MPA)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Not just irritating fog but active ingredient - dust in the Galaxy, a personal view
David Williams (Univ. College London)
25/05/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Searching for life: life-detection strategies in our solar system and beyond
Andreas Elsaesser (Freie Univ. Berlin)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Lithium abundance in the stellar system Omega Centauri
Alessio Mucciarelli (University of Bologna)

Abstract

The abundance of lithium in globular clusters stars is a valuable diagnostic to understand the self-enrichment processes occurring in the early life of these stellar systems. However, the abundance of lithium measured so far in globular cluster stars challenges the current theoretical models for the formation/evolution of GCs. We present new results concerning abundances of lithium and light elements involved in the chemical anomalies (usually observed in globular clusters) for the complex stellar system Omega Centauri.

24/05/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Star-forming galaxies near the peak of cosmic assembly in light of future surveys with Subaru's Prime-Focus Spectrograph
John Silverman (Kavli IPMU)

Abstract

Over the coming decade, our near-infrared spectroscopic view of galaxies and their environments will be greatly expanded with new instruments on the ground and in space. Beforehand, multi-aperture infrared spectrographs on 8-10m class telescopes have already given us a first assessment of the remarkable changes in the intrinsic properties of galaxies up to z ~ 3 as compared to the present day. With respect to our effort, I will give an overview of science results from FMOS-COSMOS, a NIR spectroscopic survey of 1500 emission-line (i.e., star-forming) galaxies at 1.4 < z < 1.7, and over a wide range in stellar mass, with the multi-fiber spectrograph FMOS on Subaru Telescope. Our sample is providing a characterization of the physical properties of the ISM at high-z including the metallicity, pressure, ionization, and dust content. Furthermore, the wide-area coverage of our survey is enabling us to study rare objects (dust-obscured starbursts, AGN), measure the large-scale environments of star-forming galaxies, and estimate the number density of bright Halpha emitters required for planning future cosmological tests. Finally, I will describe plans to further such studies at z > 1 and new science to be achieved with Subaru's Prime-Focus Spectrograph.

11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Lectures
Talk — Effective Field Theory of Inflation
Giovanni Cabass (MPA)
23/05/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Fuel and Feedback in Galaxy Evolution
Natasha Maddox (ASTRON)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
SESTAS
Talk — The Destructive Birth of Massive Stars and Massive Star Clusters
Anna Rosen (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — What to publish where?
Uta Grothkopf, Markus Kissler-Patig, Anne Klitsch (ESO)

Abstract

In this informal discussion we want to talk about the question of which results should be published where. We will give you an overview of the journals available for astronomers to publish their results. In particular we will present the recently reinvented AAS research notes, a journal for fast publication of small results, work in progress or null results. Furthermore, we will give an overview of the ESO publication guidelines. We will end with an introduction to open access journals and compare them with traditional journals.

22/05/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Beyond the Standard Model
Matthias Neubert (Uni Mainz)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Observing the multi-scale cosmic web at high redshift and its impact on galaxies
Clotilde Laigle (Department of Physics, University of Oxford)

Abstract

Significative evidences of the role of the cosmic web in driving galaxy properties have been measured at low redshift from spectroscopic surveys.  They support a picture in which the influence of the geometry of the large-scale environment drives anisotropic tides which impacts the assembly history of galaxies. But extracting the cosmic web from observed datasets is still a challenge, in particular at high redshift where large and complete spectroscopic surveys are extremely costly. At these redshifts, though, we expect a stronger dependency of galaxy properties on the geometry of the accretion, which makes this extraction pivotal to understand galaxy evolution.

I will give a brief overview of the current status of cosmic web analysis from high redshift observations, either photometric data or lyman-alpha surveys. While relying on a pilot study in COSMOS and forecasts from the simulated horizon-AGN lightcone, I will show how the study of the co-evolution of galaxies and the cosmic web would be possible with future probes including LSST, Euclid, PFS and MOSAIC on the ELT.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Testing Dark Energy with Gravitational-Waves
Jose Maria Ezquiaga Bravo (IFT UAM-CSIC)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — The Formation of Massive Stars with Radiative and Outflow Feedback
Anna Rosen (Harvard CfA)

Abstract

Massive stars play an essential role in the Universe. They are rare, yet the energy and momentum they inject into the interstellar medium with their intense radiation fields dwarfs the contribution by their vastly more numerous low-mass cousins. During their formation, feedback from their intense radiation fields and magnetically launched, collimated protostellar outflows can limit their growth by accretion. In this talk, I will present a series of adaptive mesh refinement 3D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the collapse of initially turbulent, massive pre-stellar cores that include radiative feedback from both the direct stellar and dust-reprocessed radiation fields and outflow feedback from the accreting stars. We find that mass is channeled to the stellar system via gravitational and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities through nonaxisymmetric disks and filaments that self-shield against radiation pressure while allowing for radiation to escape through optically thin regions. Inclusion of feedback from protostellar outflows punches holes in the ISM along the star’s polar directions, thereby increasing the size of optically thin regions where radiation can escape. This effect makes mass accretion via RT instabilities less significant. Furthermore, precession of the outflows due to the star being pushed around by the turbulent accretion flow cause the opening angles of the entrained material to increase with time. This effect, including the enhanced radiative heating by the escape of stellar radiation, further reduces accretion onto the massive star as compared to feedback from radiation alone. Our results suggest that disk accretion is therefore a requirement for the birth of massive stars, especially at late times.

18/05/18 (Friday)
11:00, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Lecture
Talk — The manifold roles of cosmic rays in star-forming environments
Marco Padovani (INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy)
17/05/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Small-Scale Substructures in Protoplanetary Disks
Sean Andrews (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
Download video |

Abstract

The canonical model for the formation of terrestrial planets and giant planets cores relies on an early and very efficient phase of planetesimal growth in a gas-rich circumstellar disk. But, as theorists have known for decades now, there are some formidable obstacles to meeting that requirement, Many of these problems, and potentially their solutions, are associated with the growth, migration and especially the localizes concentration of "pebbles" (mm/cm-sized particles) in the first few million years of a disk's lifetime. That is fortuitous, since continuum emission from these particles in nearby disks can be readily detected and resolved with long-baseline radio interferometers like ALMA. In this talk, I will describe what we are learning about the evolution of solids from such data, including: (1) the signatures of particle growth and migration; and (2) the mounting evidence that small-scale substructures in the (gas) disk play fundamental - and perhaps mandatory - roles in the planet formation process.

Video

Loading the player...
11:00, MPA room 006 | ESO Garching
EU Research Framework Programme
Julia Epp (EU office, MPQ)
11:00, MPE Old Seminar Room 209 | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — X-Ray observations of two very faint X-Ray transients (VFXTS) during their outbursts
Ari Beru (Univ. of Southampton)
16/05/18 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Scaling machine learning
Patrick van der Smagt (TUM)

Abstract

The recent surge on neural-network based data modelling shows one thing: large data sets with Gaussian properties can be efficiently and scalably represented. How can we understand these models, why are they efficient, and why are we still no-where close to solving machine learning? What can and what cannot we do yet? I will try to sort some lines of thoughts, and goal discussing personal research topics which try to address the ‘cannot’s. And unfortunately lack the time to touch upon reinforcement learning and quantum computing, since those are even less solved.

15/05/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The Dark Side Dark Matter Search program with liquid Argon
Giuliana Fiorillo (Univ. of Naples)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Probing Exoplanet Atmospheres with High-Precision Observations
Ray Jayawardhana (York University, Toronto)

Abstract

Despite formidable challenges, comparative studies of exoplanet atmospheres have begun in earnest. Exoplanets caught in transit are particularly well suited for such investigations. I will discuss attempts to probe exoplanet atmospheres using high-precision photometric and spectroscopic observations. Our analysis of Kepler phase curves reveals peak brightness offsets in some cases, possibly indicating inhomogeneous clouds and/or substantial winds. We have also begun to extend studies using high-resolution transit spectroscopy to exoplanets in the sub-Saturn and super-Earth mass regimes. Finally, I will preview plans for using the NIRISS instrument on the James Webb Space Telescope, and other exciting opportunities for the near future.

11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — Scaling Relations for Galaxies: connecting stars, gas and dust in one plane
Gustavo Orellana (Universidad de Valparaiso)

Abstract

The dust properties link to the star formation, the gas abundance, metallicity, and stellar mass and therefore it is fundamentally important to understand the evolutionary stage. Thus the characterization of this phase of the interstellar medium (ISM), best achieved in nearby galaxies, is crucial in the study of galaxy properties and their relationships with the environment in which reside. In this talk I will present scaling relations obtained in a sample of 1,630 nearby (z < 0.1) galaxies over a large range of stellar masses, SFR, and specific SFR (SFR per unit stellar mass, sSFR) with IR and sub-mm observations spanning the range from 12 to 850 microns.We find that the total infrared luminosity (Lir), the dust mass (Mdust) and the temperature of the cold dust component (Tc) form a plane that we refer to as the dust plane.

The scaling relations presented in this talk, besides providing a detailed view of the links and interplay between stars and ISM in galaxies, allow one to estimate fundamental parameters from limited observations and, therefore, represent an important resource for both using archival data in an efficient way and planning future observations. We also find the sSFR drives the position of galaxies on the dust plane: starburst (high sSFR) galaxies show higher Lir, higher Mdust and higher Tc compared to Main Sequence (typical sSFR) and passive galaxies (low sSFR). I will discuss my results in the general context of galaxy evolution and show possible future applications to the study of galaxies in dense environments and at higher redshifts.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — An astrometric search method for individually resolvable GW sources and stochastic backgrounds with Gaia
Deyan Mihaylov (IoA, Cambridge)
14/05/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Artificial photosynthesis with functional semiconductors and nanosystems
Ian Sharp (TUM)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Denoising, Deconvolving, and Decomposition of multi- demensional photon observation, D4PO and one application
Daniel Pumpe (MPA)
11/05/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Observing simulations - How reliable are surface magnetic field maps of observed cool stars?
Lisa Lehmann (University of St. Andrews)

Abstract

A question frequently asked is: how reliable are the surface magnetic field observations of stars using the Zeeman-Doppler-Imaging (ZDI) technique? We approach this question by using highly resolved non-potential flux transport simulations as our point of reference. The simulations combine a flux transport model on the photosphere with a non-potential coronal evolution model using the magnetofrictional technique. We analyse the simulations of three different stellar models (a solar-like star and two more active stars) and model the Stokes profiles for ten different surface magnetic field maps per star. Stokes IV profiles were generated assuming an inclination angle of 60˚ and 20˚. To “observe” the simulation we use these simulated Stokes profiles as input for a ZDI code. We compared our sixty reconstructed ZDI maps with the large scale field of the input models in order to provide estimates for the reliability of the recovered field, with a particular focus on their toroidal and axisymmetric properties.

09/05/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Star Forming Galaxies Near and Far: a Statistical Perspective
Paola Popesso (Cluster Universe)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Timing the formation history of double-barred galaxies with the MUSE-TIMER project
Adriana De Lorenzo-Cáceres (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias)

Abstract

In the nearby Universe, double-barred galaxies account for 20% of all disc galaxies, this fraction being a lower limit due to the difficulties inherent to the detection of inner bars embedded within the central regions of structurally complex galaxies. Forming and sustaining two coexistent non-axisymmetric structures in a galaxy is a challenging problem not well understood yet with simulations nor with observations. The TIMER project (Time Inference with MUSE in Extragalactic Rings) is a well-designed survey of barred galaxies with noticeable central structures, such as inner bars and nuclear rings, which are considered as footprints of secular evolution. The current TIMER sample is composed by 24 galaxies, two of them being confirmed double-barred systems. In this Informal Discussion I will tell you about the effort we are making to retrieving the star formation histories of the TIMER galaxies, as well as the unprecedented results on the formation and stellar properties of double-barred galaxies.

08/05/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Studying gravitational waves with radio telescopes - today and tomorrow
Michael Kramer (MPI Radioastron., Bonn)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Galactic wind properties using background quasar with MUSE and UVES
Ilane Schroetter (IRAP, University of Toulouse)

Abstract

Supernova driven outflows are thought to play a critical role in regulating the gas and baryonic content of galaxies. Most cosmological simulations rely on various prescriptions to generate these outflows that lack direct observational support due to their low surface brightness. However, these outflows can be constrained using background quasars line of sight passing near star forming galaxies. Using a combination of both MUSE and UVES instruments, we built the MusE GAs FLOw and Wind (MEGAFLOW) survey. We used the strong low-ionization MgII absorption to constrain the ejected mass rate using a bi-conical model. In this talk, I will present the results we have on these outflows from z~1 star-forming galaxies and compare them with simulation predictions.

11:00, MPE Old Seminar Room 209 | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — On merging galaxy clusters: new shocks and recent LOFAR results
Andrea Botteon (INAF-IRA Bologna)
07/05/18 (Monday)
17:15, TUM Garching, Physik Department, HS 2 | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Topological photonics
Alexander Szameit (Uni Rostock)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Learning about the Galactic disk from Gaia data
Wilma Trick (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Jason Spyromilio (ESO)

Abstract

The continuation of an incoherent discussion of emission by atoms and molecules in astrophysical plasmas. A quick recap of forbidden lines will be followed by a discussion diatomic molecules and recombination processes.

04/05/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Exponential Families on Resource-Constrained Systems
Nico Piatkowski (Uni Dortmund)
03/05/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Simba: Cosmological Galaxy Formation Simulations Including Black Hole Growth and Feedback
Romeel Davé (Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh)
Download video |

Abstract

The growth of black holes and their role in quenching massive galaxies is a key unsolved problem in galaxy formation. I present a new suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations called Simba, which builds on our successful Mufasa simulations to include a novel torque-limited black hole accretion model and AGN feedback using observationally-constrained bipolar kinetic jets. I will describe the physical motivations behind our new model, explain why they represent an improvement over other current black hole growth and feedback models, and demonstrate that they yield a galaxy population in very good agreement with numerous observations across cosmic time. These successes set the stage for exploring galaxy--black hole co-evolution towards better understanding the impact of AGN feedback on the baryon cycle along the mass hierarchy.

Video

Loading the player...
02/05/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Formation of the TRAPPIST-1 Planets
Chris Ormel (Univ. Amsterdam)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — The intrinsic shape of galactic structures
Jairo Méndez Abreu (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias)

Abstract

I will review our recent results on the intrinsic three-dimensional  (3D) shape of bulges and bars in a statistically significant sample of galaxies from the CALIFA survey. Our work, based on the outcome of accurate multi-component structural decompositions of the galaxies, allow us to derive a probabilistic estimation of the 3D shape of individual structures, and it provides a new look at the secular evolution processes taking place in nearby galaxies.

April 2018

30/04/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Shedding Light on the Dark Cosmos through Gravitational Lensing
Sherry Suyu (MPA)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Particle production by gauge fields during inflation
Azadeh Maleknejad (MPA)
27/04/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Tomography of the red supergiant star mu Cep
Kateryna Kravchenko (ESO)

Abstract

We present a tomographic method allowing to recover the velocity field at different optical depths in a stellar atmosphere. It is based on the computation of the contribution function to identify the depth of formation of spectral lines in order to construct numerical masks probing different optical depths. These masks are cross-correlated with observed spectra to extract information about the average shape of lines forming at a given optical depth and to derive the velocity field projected on the line of sight. We applied this method to series of spectra of the red supergiant star mu Cep and derived velocities in different atmospheric layers. The resulting velocity variations reveal complex atmospheric dynamics and indicate that convective cells are present in the atmosphere of the mu Cep. The mu Cep velocities were compared with those obtained by applying the tomographic masks to series of snapshot spectra from 3D radiative-hydrodynamics CO5BOLD simulations.

26/04/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Cosmology and Astrophysics from CMB Measurements
John Carlstrom (University of Chicago)
Download video |

Abstract

Measurements of the CMB have driven our understanding of the universe and the physics that govern its evolution from primordial quantum fluctuations to its present state. They provide the foundation for the remarkable 6-parameter cosmological model, ΛCDM, which fits all cosmological data, although there are some tensions, which may provide hints at new physics. Far from being the last word in cosmology, the model raises deep questions: Is Inflation correct? What is its energy scale? What is the dark matter? What is the nature of dark energy? Are there additional light relic particles? The increasingly sensitive CMB observations being made to address these questions also provide powerful and unique probes of astrophysics. This talk will discuss recent experimental developments and observational results, primarily from the 10m South Pole Telescope (SPT), as well as the vision and planning for future CMB measurements, in particular CMB-S4.

Video

Loading the player...
25/04/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Cool Planets of Cool Stars
Eike Guenther (Tautenburg Observatory)
11:00, MPA room 006 | ESO Garching
SESTAS
Talk — Internal Gravity Waves in Massive Stars
Tamara Rogers (Newcastle)
10:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Impressions and Experiences from the ESO Astronomy Research Training programme in Ghana
Allison Man, Fabrizio Arrigoni Battaia & Lisa Löbling (ESO)

Abstract

We would like to share our manifold impressions and experiences from our recent trip to Ghana with you.

We will summarize our workshop with 40 Ghanaian students held at the University of Cape Coast, as well as the outreach activities we conducted in a fishing village and at the Ghana Planetarium in Accra (the only planetarium in sub-Saharan Africa outside of South Africa).

Furthermore, we would like to discuss the way forward for this initiative.

24/04/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The First Six years of AMS on the International Space Station
Stefan Schael (RWTH Aachen)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — A closer look to z~1 disc galaxies turbulent life
Vera Patricio (Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen)

Abstract

Disc galaxies at z~1 are known to be more clumpy and turbulent than their local counter parts. However, with the current observing facilitates, we are mostly limited to study these features at 1-2 kpc scales.  A way to overcome this issue before the new generation of telescopes becomes available, is to target strongly lensed objects. In this talk, I will show some of the results we obtained studying a representative sample of 8 strongly lensed galaxies at z~1, where spatial resolutions of a couple hundred parsecs can be reached. Using both MUSE and HST data we analysed the kinematics of these objects, focusing on the velocity dispersion of the ionised gas and their relationship with star-forming regions, providing some clues on local star-formation feedback at z~1.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Scheduling Synoptic Surveys for Precision Cosmology
Daniel Rothchild (IoA Cambridge)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Tensor Non-Gaussianity from Inflation
Aniket Agrawal (MPA)
23/04/18 (Monday)
17:15, TUM Garching, Physik Department, HS 2 | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — The response of the global stratospheric circulation to climate change
Hella Garny (LMU)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The impact of AGN feedback on the kinematics of simulated galaxies
Matteo Frigo (MPA)
12:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Molecules as probe of the structure of Interstellar clouds
Maryvonne Gerin (LERMA, Observatoire de Paris)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Paolo Padovani (ESO)

Abstract

IceCube has recently reported the discovery of high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin, opening up the PeV (10^15 eV) sky. These observations are challenging to interpret on the astronomical side and have triggered a fruitful collaboration across particle and astro-physics. I will first discuss neutrinos in an astronomical context. I will then make the case for extreme blazars, i.e. strong, very high energy gamma-ray sources of the high energy peaked type, to be the counterparts of at least some of the IceCube neutrinos. This scenario is supported by positional and energetic matches, theoretical modelling, and Monte Carlo simulations and has been confirmed very recently by the detection of gamma-ray emission from an extreme blazar within the error circle of an IceCube event. The talk is self-contained, requires no previous knowledge of neutrinos or blazars, and has been prepared for a very broad audience.

20/04/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — Metrics for Deep Generative Models - CANCELED
Patrick van der Smagt (AI Research, Volkswagen Group, Munich)
19/04/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Hypervelocity stars in the GAIA era
Elena Rossi (Leiden University)

Abstract

In this talk, I will present my work on two novel ways to map the Galaxy. The first one exploits a particular class of dark matter tracers - hypervelocity stars. These are stars observed in the halo with trajectories consistent with coming from the Galactic. My group has undertaken a comprehensive program to find them in the Gaia catalogue and model them in a full statistical framework to extract information on the mass and the shape of the Milky Way's halo. In addition, we are forecasting the ability of double white dwarfs to trace the Milky Way bulge and disc, when combining Gaia and LSST data with the future gravitational wave detections by the ESA mission LISA.

18/04/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — The cosmic epoch dependence of environmental effects on size evolution of red-sequence early-type galaxies
Stefano Andreon (INAF - OA Brera)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Viscosity and angular momentum transport in gaseous disks
Thomas Rivinius (ESO)

Abstract

I will discuss the formation and dissipation of circumstellar disks around B-type emission line stars, and what we can learn from that in a wider context. A forming disk comes with a unique photometric signature constraining the absolute gas density and density law in the disk. When the time evolution of this signature is undisturbed by additional events, it allows to measure the viscosity in the disk, as it builds up and decays, as well as to constrain the mass and angular momentum losses from the star during such an event. Considering that Be stars are near critical rotators, the angular momentum loss from the star must be driven by the angular momentum transport from the evolving stellar core to the surface, and in this way Be stars may be used to calibrate stellar internal mixing theory well beyond its current limits.

17/04/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — LEGEND: Future Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay with Germanium
Iris Abt (MPP)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The disc origin of the Milky Way bulge
Francesca Fragkoudi (Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics)

Abstract

Examining the chemo-morphological relations of stellar populations in the Milky Way (MW) bulge can provide clues to the formation history of our Galaxy, and of disc galaxies in general. To explore the possible disc origin of the MW bulge we use an N-body simulation in which the bulge forms secularly through the vertical heating of a bar, which in turn forms from a composite thin+thick disc. The simulation is compared to data of the bulge obtained with the near infrared spectroscopic survey APOGEE. As I will show, all the chemo-morphological relations examined are well reproduced by the model, as is the metallicity distribution function (MDF) of the MW bulge as a function of galactic longitude and latitude. These findings show that the chemical composition of the MW bulge is consistent with it being made up of thin+thick disc stellar populations. I will discuss these results in light of the mounting evidence -- from morphology, kinematics and chemistry -- of the MW bulge's pure disc origin.

10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — Estimating distances from parallaxes: beware of the pitfalls
Henri Boffin (ESO)
16/04/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Probing the unfolding/refolding dynamics of individual proteins with AFM by leveraging enhanced spatio-temporal resolution
Devin Edwards (JILA, Boulder, USA)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Sgr A* flares and molecular gas in the Galactic Center region
Eugene Churazov (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — The environments of explosive stellar transients: clues to the progenitors of ccSNe
Patricia Schady (MPE)
13/04/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Variability of the (former) prototype Be-star and BeXRB gamma Cas
Camilla Borre & Thomas Rivinius (ESO)

Abstract

The origin of these X-rays remain a mystery and only a handful of other stars displaying this phenomenon has been observed. The emission from the disk and the star vary on timescales from second to years and understanding these variations might provide an answer to the peculiar behaviour of disk formation and X-ray emission. I will give a more detailed description of the Be-stars in general and gamma Cas in  discuss some first results from time-series analysis using data from the SMEI satellite.

11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — (topic to be announced)
Liyong Liu (National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences)
12/04/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — LOFAR and 21cm from the EoR
Saleem Zaroubi (Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen)
Download video |

Abstract

In the last decade a large effort has been dedicated to detect one of the last phase transitions in the Universe called the Epoch of Reionization and its preceding epoch know as the Cosmic Dawn, specially with the redshifted 21 cm probe. I will review the status of the various constraints that we currently have on reionization. I will also show the current results from a number of operating telescopes in the 2 meter wavelenght, a special attention will be paid to the recent results obtained from telescopes like EDGES and LOFAR.

Video

Loading the player...
11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — The WISSH quasars project: revealing ultra-massive black-holes and powerful winds in the most luminous AGN
Giustina Vietri (ESO)
11/04/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Outer Halos of Galaxies from Field to Cluster Environment
Rhea-Silvia Remus (LMU)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Formal methods for software reliability and systems analysis
Jan Křetínský (TUM)

Abstract

We present the area of theoretical computer science called formal methods. We survey several ways how formal methods can help to ensure correctness of software. Further, we describe techniques for analysis of systems featuring probabilistic phenomena, where we do not rely only on simulations but rather on rigorous analysis and discuss their potential advantages.

10/04/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Understanding Very High Energy p-p Cross Sections
Leo Stodolsky (MPP)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Experimental Studies of Surface Processes for Astrophysics
Gianfranco Vidali (Syracuse Univ.)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Discussion on the observation of the 21cm absorption from EDGES and its theoretical expectations
Benedetta Ciardi (MPA)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Deconstructing the neutrino mass constraints from galaxy redshift surveys
Aoife Boyle (MPA)
09/04/18 (Monday)
17:15, TUM Garching, Physik Department, HS 2 | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Nuclear physics as precision science
Ulf-G. Meissner (Bonn University)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The primordial magnetic field in our cosmic backyard
Sebastian Hutschenreuter (MPA)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — The importance of laboratory experiments in astrochemical modeling and astronomical observations
Jiao He (Leiden Observatory)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Torsten Ensslin & Philipp Arras (MPA & Heidelberg University)

Abstract

Information field theory (IFT) provides probabilistic image reconstruction algorithms for incomplete and noisy data. Numerical information field theory (NIFTy) is a Python library for IFT algorithms. We provide a short introduction into the usage of NIFTy for astronomical data with a practice oriented demo, covering the Wiener filter and radio interferometric imaging. NIFTy is maintained by the IFT group at the MPI for Astrophysics and is available here: https://gitlab.mpcdf.mpg.de/ift/NIFTy

05/04/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The build-up of galactic nuclei: how do black holes get there?
Nadine Neumayer (MPIA, Heidelberg)
Download video |

Abstract

The centers of massive galaxies are special in many ways, not least because all of them are believed to host supermassive black holes. Since the discovery of a number of relations linking the mass of this central black hole to the large scale properties of the surrounding galaxy bulge it has been suspected that the growth of the central black hole is intimately connected to the evolution of its host galaxy. However, at lower masses, and especially for bulgeless galaxies, the situation is much less clear. Interestingly, these galaxies often host massive star clusters at their centers, and unlike black holes, these nuclear star clusters provide a visible record of the accretion of stars and gas into the nucleus. I will present our ongoing observing programme of the nearest nuclear star clusters, including the one in our Milky Way. Theses observations provide important information on the formation mechanism of nuclear star clusters. They allow us to measure potential black hole masses and might give a clue on how black holes get to the centers of galaxies.

Video

Loading the player...
04/04/18 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — A3COSMOS: Mining the ALMA Archive Automatically in the COSMOS Field – The Evolution of Gas Fraction and Depletion Time in Dusty Star-Forming Galaxies up to Redshift 6
Daizhong Liu (MPIA, Heidelberg)

Abstract

The cold gas reservoir in galaxies determines their star formation rates over cosmic time. However, measuring the amount of cold gas in a large sample of galaxies was difficult in observation. Lack of observation constraints, the understanding of gas evolution from simulations and semi-analytic modeling is strongly limited. Fortunately, an alternative method of using dust continuum as an indirect proxy for cold gas has been developed during the last few years, and can be applied to thousands of galaxies that have (sub-)millimeter observations. Here I introduce our A3COSMOS project: mining the ALMA Archive Automatically in the COSMOS field. We exploited the full public ALMA archive in COSMOS in a systematic and automated way, with detailed photometry and extensive Monte Carlo simulation verifications. A3COSMOS aims at obtaining ALMA continuum photometry for each star-forming galaxy that falls into public ALMA pointings in COSMOS, and also detect any galaxy that is not in optical/near-infrared/radio prior catalogs. This pipelined exploitation will be regularly updated with ingesting more data as it becomes available. With ~650 currently well-constrained galaxies from 800+ high confidence ALMA detections, I present the properties of these galaxies and the newly measured evolution of gas fraction (gas-to-stellar mass ratio) and depletion time (=Mgas/SFR). I will demonstrate how galaxies’ spectral energy distributions and photometric redshifts can be much improved with our ALMA photometry, and how galaxies’ gas masses can be differed due to conversion methods, as well as how our new results can more tightly constrain the gas evolution compared to literature works.

March 2018

27/03/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Type I shell galaxies as a test of gravity
Hajar Vakili (Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology)

Abstract

Shell galaxies are understood to form through the collision of a dwarf galaxy with an elliptical galaxy. Shell structures and kinematics have been noted to be independent tools to measure the gravitational potential of the shell galaxies. We compare theoretically the formation of shells in Type I shell galaxies in different gravity theories in this work because this is so far missing in the literature.

We include Newtonian plus dark halo gravity, and two non-Newtonian gravity models, MOG and MOND, in identical initial systems. We investigate the effect of dynamical friction, which by slowing down the dwarf galaxy in the dark halo models limits the range of shell radii to low values. Under the same initial conditions, shells appear on a shorter timescale and over a smaller range of distances in the presence of dark matter than in the corresponding non-Newtonian gravity models. If galaxies are embedded in a dark matter halo, then the merging time may be too rapid to allow multi-generation shell formation as required by observed systems because of the large dynamical friction effect. Starting from the same initial state, in the dark halo model the observation of small bright shells should be accompanied by large faint ones, while for the case of MOG, the next shell generation patterns iterate with a specific time delay. The first shell generation pattern shows a degeneracy with the age of the shells and in different theories, but the relative distance of the shells and the shell expansion velocity can break this degeneracy.

26/03/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The progenitor of SN1987A: is it a single star
Annop Wongwathanarat (MPA)
23/03/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — The rationality of irrationality in the Monty Hall problem
Torsten Ensslin and Margret Westerkamp (MPA)

Abstract

The rational solution of the Monty Hall problem unsettles many people.Most people, including us, think it feels wrong to switch the initialchoice of one of the three doors, despite having fully accepted themathematical proof for its superiority. Many people, if given the choiceto switch, think the chances are fifty-fifty between their options, butstill strongly prefer to stick to their initial choice. Is there someratio behind these irrational feelings?

22/03/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Birth of adaptive optics and optical interferometry at ESO, a brief overview - CANCELED
Pierre Léna (Observatoire de Paris & LESIA)

Abstract

In 1979, ESO called a Conference on the Scientific Importance of High Angular Resolution at Infrared and Visible Wavelengths. This was at the time of the emergence of the VLT and only a few years after Labeyrie had revived optical interferometry. Exactly ten years later (1989), thanks to the vision ESO had of the potential future of adaptive optics, the first ever demonstration of this emerging technique was made at Saint-Michel and pursued at La Silla. In parallel, the dream of coherently coupling the 8.2 m telescopes took form, until approved by the Council in 1987. The Seminar will recall some highlights of this story of a « fight against fuziness », and compare the hopes with the current reality in 2017.

20/03/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Quantum Communication foundations and prospects
Anton Zeilinger (Univ. Wien)
11:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Gas-phase metallicity in star forming galaxies: from large spectral surveys to spatially resolved observations
Mirko Curti (INAF – Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri)

Abstract

Galaxies continuously undergo chemical enrichment. Heavy elements are produced in stars and then dispersed into the interstellar medium by means of stellar winds and supernovae. Gas flows also contribute to regulate the amount of metals in the ISM; therefore, gas-phase metallicity represents a fossil record of the recent star formation history and is strongly sensitive to all the processes that drive the baryon-cycle in galaxies.

In this talk, I will first discuss the method for measuring chemical abundances in star forming galaxies, presenting a re-calibration of the most common metallicity diagnostics based on strong emission lines  by means of stacking galaxy spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey according to their observed line ratios.

I will discuss also the evolution in the excitation properties and chemical abundances for a sample of high-redshift (1.2 < z < 2.5) gravitationally lensed sources, observed in the framework of the ESO Large Program KLEVER. Exploiting KMOS observations in the J, H and K bands we aim to map multiple optical rest-frame nebular diagnostics allowing a full, detailed characterisation of the ISM properties in these objects on a spatially resolved basis.

19/03/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Towards a reconstruction of the formation history of large scale structures
Franz Elsner (MPA)
12:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — The FERMI excess investigated over the whole gamma-ray sky using a multi wavelength analysis
Wim de Boer (KIT, Karlsruhe)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — Gas matters: how gas fraction helps us better understand star formation in z = 2 galaxies
Jérémy Fensch (ESO)
16/03/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Li-rich Giants
George Angelou (MPA)

Abstract

Description:Theoretical models of stellar evolution predict that most of the lithium inside a star is destroyed as the star becomes a red giant. However, observations reveal that about 1% of red giants are peculiarly rich in lithium, often exceeding the amount in the interstellar medium or predicted from the Big Bang. Here we report the discovery of 2,330 low-mass (1 − 3M) lithium-rich giant stars, which we show are consistent with internal lithium production that is driven by the tidal spin-up from a binary companion. Our sample reveals that most lithium-rich giants have helium-burning cores and that the frequency of lithium-rich giants rises with increasing stellar metallicity.

12:30, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — On-sky closed loop correction of atmospheric dispersion for high-contrast coronagraphy and astrometry
Prashant Pathak (ESO)

Abstract

On ground-based telescopes employing adaptive optics (AO) systems, atmospheric dispersion compensation is essential to deliver high-quality imaging, and critical for coronagraphy and high-precision astrometry. In AO systems delivering high-Strehl, residual dispersion if often a dominant source of error, and is especially challenging to correct on large aperture telescopes. Imperfect compensation by atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC) can be due to errors in the atmospheric dispersion estimation (usually derived from local temperature and pressure measurements), or calibration errors in the instrument and ADC optics. These limitations can be addressed with a high-precision on-sky measurement of residual dispersion in a closed-loop control scheme. In this work, we present a focal plane based technique, which utilizes the chromatic scaling of speckles to measure residual dispersion (atmospheric and optical) in the final science image. By using an adaptive speckle grid generated using a deformable mirror (DM) with a sufficiently large number of actuators, the residual dispersion is accurately measured and subsequently corrected in a closed-loop control. On-sky residual dispersion of < 1 mas across H-band was demonstrated, which reduced from 8.4 mas before closing the loop.

11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Populations of soft and supersoft X-ray sources in M51TBA
Ilkham Galiullin (Kazan Federal Univ.)
15/03/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Gravitational-Wave Emission and their Multi-Messenger Signatures
Alessandra Buonanno (Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Potsdam)

Abstract

The detection of gravitational waves has opened a new era of scientific discovery, as it permits a new kind of observation of the cosmos, quite different from electromagnetic and particle observations. In this talk I will review the gravitational-wave signals detected up to now by LIGO and Virgo, and discuss the theoretical groundwork that allows to identify and interpret those signals. I will also highlight how those new astronomical messengers are unveiling the properties of the most extreme astrophysical objects in the universe and probe fundamental physics.

14/03/18 (Wednesday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Jan Hendrik Oort: 75 years of passion for Astronomy (Part II)
Dietrich Baade (ESO)

Abstract

Jan Hendrik Oort:  75 years of passion for astronomy

Jan Hendrik Oort’s (1900-1992) professional life is part of the astronomical world heritage.

Part II will tell the most exciting stories of Oort’s research - the rotation of the Galaxy, the Crab nebula, the solar-system cloud of comets, and the boot strapping of radio astronomy - and delineate the links of his work to that of other famous astronomers of his time.

13/03/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Carbon-rich chains in space and in the laboratory
Sven Thorwirth (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. zu Koeln)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Central Galaxies and Satellites in Fossil Systems
Stefano Zarattini (CEA Saclay)

Abstract

Fossil systems (FS) are groups or clusters of galaxies whose optical emission is dominated by a single giant galaxy. The lack of bright satellites is thought to be a sign of an evolved system, in which the central galaxy has had enough time to merge all the bright satellite population. At the same time, few interactions are expected within FS and the cosmic web. For these reasons, FS are considered fossil relics of the ancient Universe. However, this formation scenario has been questioned in recent years. In particular, controversial results were presented regarding X-ray and optical scaling relations, formation histories of the brightest central galaxies (BCGs), and the relaxation status of these systems.

In this seminar I will present some of the latest results from the Fossil Group Origins (FOGO) project. In the first part of the talk will be presented results on the satellite population: in particular, the dependence of the LF on the magnitude gap (the key parameter in the definition of FS) and one deep spectroscopic LF of a nearby (z=0.05) fossil group.

In the second part of the seminar, the attention will be focused on the BCGs of the two nearest-known FS (z=0.013 and z=0.025). I will present their resolved stellar populations and discuss their formation histories, trying to highlight the differences with BCGs in non-fossil systems.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Evolution of baryons in the high-redshift universe
Hamsa Padmanabhan (ETHZ)
12/03/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Stellar Parameters in an Instant: Rise of the Machines - CANCELLED
George Angelou (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Adriano Agnello (ESO)

Abstract

Gravitational lensing allows us to weigh distant objects, measure cosmological distances, and get a super-resolved view of very distant sources. Its various regimes (strong lensing, weak lensing, microlensing and variations on these themes) have manifold applications in contemporary astrophysics.

In this mini-lecture, I will start with an overview of the basic principles and formalism, and some quick numbers for different astrophysical regimes. The second part of this mini-lecture will present a birdseye view of applications, somewhat biased towards topics that I have worked upon.

I will keep the formalism to a minimum. Links to more exhaustive materials will be provided with the slides.

09/03/18 (Friday)
13:30, Auditorium Telescopium (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — The history of the two 16-meter telescopes
Jacques M. Beckers (NOAO/ESO Astronomer, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA (Retired))

Abstract

The February 13, 2018 ESO NEWS Release eso1806 announced the first time use of the VLT combined four Unit telescope foci (thus making it the first 16-meter in existence!). It reminded me of the other 16-meter telescope which was being designed by National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) in the USA in the mid-1980’s under the name National New Technology Telescope (NNTT). Both VLT and NNTT use four 8-meter mirrors whose light was combined in both incoherent and coherent foci; the former had collecting diameters of 16 meter, the latter had resolution diameters of 22 meter (NNTT) and 130 meter (VLT/VLTI). I was involved in the design of both. Because of unfortunate circumstances the NNTT was cancelled in 1988, shortly after NOAO and ESO had agreed to coordinate their technological efforts. Following that I joined ESO in the implementation of the VLTI.

My talk will describe both efforts and the influence my earlier experience as Director of the Multi Mirror Telescope (MMT) affected both designs. That includes the inclusion of the Homothetic Beamcombiner referred to as the VLTI “Beckers Pit”. The talk will naturally involve much of my biography.

08/03/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — High-precision stellar spectroscopy paving new ways to Galactoseismology
Maria Bergemann (MPIA, Heidelberg)
Download video |

Abstract

Stellar spectroscopy is becoming vitally important in many fields of modern astronomy. This method allows estimation of fundamental parameters of stars and their chemical abundances, the information crucial for studies of stellar physics, star - planet connection, structure and evolution of galaxies. Large surveys, like the Gaia-ESO and 4MOST, will deliver millions of spectra of stars from the most distant corners of the Milky Way. Next-generation facilities, like the E-ELT, will observe stars beyond tens of megaparsecs past the Local Group.


I will highlight some of the key advances in spectroscopy of cool stars, both from the observational and theoretical perspectives. New models of stellar atmospheres and spectra, which account for hydrodynamics and non-local thermodynamic equilibrium, make stars look different and turn classical concepts about stellar physics and Galactic  evolution upside-down. I will discuss how these developments impact our understanding of the Milky Way’s past, in particular, in relation to the emerging field of Galactoseimology, and present outlook for the future studies.

Video

Loading the player...
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
Cosmology Lectures
Talk — Reheating After Inflation
Kaloian Lozanov (MPA)
07/03/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Galaxy Cluster Discussion Group
Talk — The role of mass and environment in galaxy evolution at z~1
Ana Paulino Afonso (Lisbon University & Lancaster University)

Abstract

The VIMOS Spectroscopic Survey of a Supercluster in the COSMOS field (VIS3COS) aims to accurately map in 3D a superstructure at 0.8<z<0.9, which contains 3 massive X-rays confirmed clusters and shows a striking filamentary structure in the HiZELS Ha survey at z=0.84. The ~500 spectroscopic members probe a wide range of densities and environments (from fields to the cluster outskirts/rich groups).

In this talk, I will present this survey (Paulino-Afonso et al., A&A submitted) and our efforts to detail and understand the mass-environment relation, the nature of post-starburst galaxies and the role of mergers (Paulino-Afonso et al., in prep.). Mass or environment: which plays the key role? Can we witness the transformation of the blue sequence into the red sequence? If so, where is it more prominent: in the filaments, groups or clusters? Is this transformation also being encoded in the galaxy morphology? And what is happening to the interstellar medium pressure (or electron density)?

10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — How is star formation quenched in a massive galaxy?
Allison Man (ESO)

Abstract

A long-standing question in galaxy evolution is how "red-and-dead" elliptical galaxies have been assembled. Thanks to the advancement of sensitive, wide-field near-infrared instruments in the past decade, we now know that such galaxies were already in place when the Universe was only a few billion years old. Their high stellar masses and low current star formation rates imply that they must have formed their stars very efficiently at z>2, and its star formation was rapidly shut down (“quenched”) thereafter. What is the physical process that quenches star formation at z~2? Active galactic nuclei feedback is the most commonly accepted interpretation, but its role in galaxy star formation remains controversial.

In this talk, I will review the evidence for early quenching in massive galaxies and the various quenching mechanisms proposed in literature. To address this decade-old puzzle, I will present new results from our multi-wavelength campaign of a sample of z~2 quiescent galaxies with ALMA, VLA and VLT, providing strong constraints on their stellar populations and interstellar medium.

06/03/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — The structural evolution of star-forming galaxies in the COSMOS field
Ana Paulino Afonso (Lisbon University & Lancaster University)

Abstract

When galaxies first form in a turbulent young Universe, they have diverse and complex morphologies. That has changed dramatically over the last 13 Gyr as elliptical and spiral shapes now dominate the bulk of local galaxy morphologies, as depicted by the Hubble diagram. The exact details of how and when these transformations happened still elude astronomers.

On this talk, I will show you a summary of our results on the evolution of galaxy structure across cosmic time (Paulino-Afonso et al. 2017, 2018). I will focus on the evolution of Ha and Lya emitting galaxies from z~0 to z~7 and contextualize this population of galaxies on the global picture of galaxy evolution.

05/03/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — The beauty of home grown fields
Torsten Ensslin (MPA)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Jacek Krelowski (Torun Center for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University)
View slides |

Abstract

Interstellar clouds, filling the space between stars, may be revealed thanks to either some spectral features originating in very rarefied gas or to the selective attenuation of the starlight, known as interstellar extinction. Selectivity means that a star, shining through a cloud or clouds is more red than intrinsically as the extinction is higher in blue range than in red. This is why extinction is nicknamed "reddening".

Extinction is being carried by dust particles of the submicron size. They are believed to be originated in vicinities of mass-loosing stars and then - to evolve in the interstellar space from bare to core-mantle ones.

However, grains, seen in any individual cloud, may be apparently seriously of different size, shape and chemical/cristalline composition. In a vast majority of cases one observes distant stars through several clouds, seeing thus an ill-defined average(s) which are very difficult to be interpreted in terms of any physical theory.

Currently I try, together with Ralf Siebenmorgen and Jonathan Smoker, to retrieve and compare extinction laws in several individual interstellar clouds.

02/03/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Useful Programs for Spectroscopy
Sara Mancino, Misa Aoki, Barnabas Barna, Riano Escate Giribaldi, Lisa Löbling (ESO)

Abstract

A group of PhD students will present several different programs they use for spectroscopy of different kinds of stars and objects and will shortly describe their characteristics, use and advantages.

01/03/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Forward modeling galaxies and supermassive black holes
Kevin Schawinski (ETH Zurich)
Download video |

Abstract

Extragalactic astrophysics suffers from an extreme case of time scale mismatch between human lives (1e2 years) and galaxies (1e8-9 years), making laboratory experiments impractical. In order to build a physics-based account of how galaxies formed and evolved together with their central supermassive black holes, we need to be able to forward model the processes involved.

I will present the ways in which my group attempts to do this using a combination of phenomenological models and artificial intelligence. I discuss how a large fraction of the behavior of black holes can be accounted for with a simple, near-universal distribution of accretion rates originating very close to the black hole, and how this fits into our understanding of how galaxies `turn off' their star formation. I also show how we can use new methods from artificial intelligence to extract more insight from existing data, and how we can use the for data-driven forward models of galaxy evolution. Finally, I outline how data-driven methods can push forward astrophysics in particular and science in general over the coming years.

Video

Loading the player...
12:00, MPA room 006 | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — The X_CO conversion factor from galactic multiphase ISM simulations
Munan Gong (MPE)

February 2018

28/02/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Galaxy Cluster Discussion Group
Talk — Galaxy Cluster Cosmology with the South Pole Telescope: weak lensing mass calibration
Sebastian Bocquet (Uni Munchen)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Jan Hendrik Oort: 75 years of passion for Astronomy (Part I)
Dietrich Baade (ESO)

Abstract

Jan Hendrik Oort:  75 years of passion for astronomy

Jan Hendrik Oort’s (1900-1992) professional life is part of the astronomical world heritage.

Part I outlines Oort’s professional life with his seminal roles as founding father of radioastronomy in Europe and of a joint European optical observatory (ESO) as outstanding highlights.  It also gives an overview of the half dozen scientific fields which he influenced in a lasting fashion. These topics are nearly fully unrelated to one another, ranging from the solar system to the dynamics of the Milky Way and on to the large-scale structure of the Universe.  Oort’s achievements are interwoven into a unique network of 20th century astrophysics.  Very few people have similarly inspiringly combined unfiltered scientific curiosity with a firm, focused instinct for what is relevant and how it can be made bear fruit.

27/02/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Dark Matter Superfluidity and Galactic Dynamics
Lasha Berezhiani (MPP)
26/02/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Measuring ISM metallicities in nearby and distant galaxies
Rob Yates (MPA)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Colloquium
Talk — On the Gas Content and Efficiency of AGN Feedback in Low-redshift Quasars
Jinyi Shangguan (KIAA, Beijing)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Martin Zwaan (ESO)
22/02/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Star-forming regions near and far: a statistical perspective
Paola Popesso (TUM)
Download video |

Abstract

The evolution of the star formation activity and, thus, the assembly of the stellar content of galaxies remain at the heart of galaxy evolution studies. It is now rather well established that most galaxies form stars at a level, dictated mainly by their stellar mass and regulated by secular processes. This is seen as a Main Sequence (MS) in the Star `Formation Rate (SFR)-stellar mass plane. The normalization of this sequence declines with time since z~2, indicating an overall decrease of the star formation activity of the galaxy population in the Universe. However, we do not yet fully understand the processes that control this evolution, nor how individual galaxies evolve relative to it. While the existence of a MS may seem to suggest a simple and universal mode of star formation in galaxies (on average), the deviations indicate a more complex relation between galaxy SFRs, gas reservoir, external and internal mechanisms triggering or halting star formation. In this context I will show, with a statistical approach, how the MS evolves from the local Universe up to z~2 in slope and normalization, by using the deepest available UV and far-infrared galaxy surveys. In addition, I will discuss our results based on the Hubble Deep UV (HDUV) Survey about the interplay between environment, morphology and feedback in setting the distribution of galaxies around the MS at any redshift.

Video

Loading the player...
14:00, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Special Universe Lecture
Talk — The Belle II experiment at the verge of first collisions. Hot topics in the physics analysis program
Philipp Urquijo (University of Melbourne, Cluster guest)
11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — Blazars as the Highest Energy Cosmic Accelerators
Foteini Oikonomou (ESO)
21/02/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Galaxy Cluster Discussion Group
Talk — Tracing the transition from galaxy halos to the intra-cluster light with stellar kinematics
Johanna Hartke (ESO)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — On the rotation curve of our Galaxy
Jacek Krelowski (Torun Center for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University)

Abstract

The rotation curve of the Galaxy is generally thought to be flat.However, using radial velocities of interstellar molecular clouds, which is common in rotation curve determination, seems to be incorrect and may lead to incorrectly inferring the shape of the rotation curve is flat. Tests, using photometric and spectral observations of bright stars as the rotation tracers are affected by motions of stars around local gravity centers and pulsation effects, seen in such early type objects, are difficult to betaken into account unless a lot of observing work is involved. I propose a method of studying the kinematics of the thin disc of our Galaxy outside the solar orbit in a way that avoids these problems. The proposed test is based on observations of interstellarCaII H and K lines which allow to determine both radial velocities and distances. The test was implemented using stellar spectra of thin disc stars at galactic longitudes of 135deg and 180deg. Using this method, I constructed the rotation curve of the thin disc of the Galaxy. The test leads to the obvious conclusion that the rotation curve of the thin gaseous galactic disk, represented by the CaII lines, is Keplerian outside the solar orbit rather than flat.

20/02/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Planetesimal dynamics in binary star systems: just how destructive are the collisions? Producing distant solar system bodies by mutual scattering of planetary embryos
Kedron Silsbee (MPE)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Neutron capture elements and deuterium in simulations of galaxy formation - CANCELED
Freeke van de Voort (HITS, Heidelberg)

Abstract

Throughout cosmic history, stars have been destroying deuterium and creating heavier elements. Generally, cosmological simulations include only the most abundant elements, such as oxygen and carbon, but there is much to be learned about our universe from other species. Neutron star mergers are rare, but last year's kilonova observations provided strong evidence that they produce copious amounts of rapid neutron capture (r-process) elements. It is still not clear how such rare events manage to efficiently enrich the interstellar medium, as inferred from observations of abundances in low-metallicity stars. In this talk, I will discuss cosmological zoom-in simulations of Milky Way-mass galaxies with explicit treatment of r-process enrichment via neutron star mergers. I will show that there is sufficient mixing to match current observational constraints and thus that our results are consistent with neutron star mergers being the source of most of the r-process nuclei in the Universe. Our new simulations also include slow neutron capture (s-process) enrichment via asymptotic giant branch stars, which traces mass loss by the old stellar population. I will show preliminary results on the relative importance of these two channels of neutron capture elements. I will end with a discussion on the deuterium abundance in the interstellar and intergalactic medium, which can be used to probe cosmology as well as the importance of stellar mass loss and thus the assembly history of galaxies.

11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — The Cosmic gamma-ray Horizon, Extragalactic Background Light and the Star Formation History revealed by Fermi-LAT
Kari Helgason (MPA)
10:00, Fornax (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Self-similar Dynamic Processes of Gravitational Collapses: Spherical and Cylindrical Systems
Yu-Qing Lou (Tsinghua University)

Abstract

We present several self-similar dynamic models for gravitational collapses in spherical and cylindrical geometries, respectively. Among others, we offer a solution to the luminosity problem (Kenyon et al. 1994) in protostar formation by a polytropic self-similar hydrodynamic model with variable central mass accretion rate (Gao & Lou 2017), advance a general polytropic dynamic model for the cold molecular cloud core Barnard 68 (Li, Lou, Esimbek 2017) in contrast to a static isothermal model of Alves et al. (2001), point out the incorrectness for the asymptotic density scaling of Tilley & Pudritz (2003) for an isothermal magnetohydrodynamic cylinder (Lou & Xing 2016), and derive the correct analytical asymptotic solution to replace the wrong asymptotic central free-fall solution of Kawachi & Hanawa (1998) for a conventional polytropic hydrodynamic cylinder in Lou & Hu (2017).

19/02/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Reheating after Inflation
Kaloian Lozanov (MPA)
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — The properties of the inner disk around HL Tau: Multi-wavelength modeling of the dust emission
Yao Liu (MPIA Heidelberg)
16/02/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Chemical signatures of planetary formation? Accurate effective temperature of solar-type stars.
Riano Escate Giribaldi (ESO)

Abstract

The discovery of the first exoplanet (Mayor & Queloz 1995) and the fast increasing subsequent detections raised the importance of accurate and precise determination of stellar parameters, since their characterization depend on them.

The effective temperature (Teff) is the most fundamental parameter, since it is required to derive other parameters such as mass and radius as well as measure chemical abundances.

Several studies have shown the existence of a correlation between the metallicity of the stars and the presence of planets (i.e. Fischer & Valenti 2005; Santos+2004). Some hypothesis has been proposed to explain this link, from a rich primordial cloud as a requisite to form planets (Pollack+1996) to stars increasing their metallicity by engulfment of planets (Laughlin & Adams 1997). Furthermore, a potential chemical signature as a trace of planetary formation have been proposed (Melendez+2009), for which identification, Teff's of unprecedented precision are required (10 K at most).

In this talk I will summarize my work in this context and the results of the first part of my research:

- The implementation of the methodology to derive accurate Teff's by fitting of observed and synthetic Halpha Balmer profiles. With it, errors associated to other techniques are circumvented, i.e. temperature-metallicity degeneracies and line-list selection (excitation and ionization equilibrium), reddening and photometry (InfraRed flux method).

- The accuracy of the theory at solar parameters is established and the reliability of HARPS spectra is checked.

15/02/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The composition of cometary ices: clues to solar system formation
Dominique Bockelée-Morvan (LESIA, Observatoire de Paris)
Download video |

Abstract

The composition of cometary ices provides clues to the chemistry and conditions prevailing in theearly solar system. Since the detection of HCN at millimeter wavelengths in comet C/1973 E1 (Kohoutek), almost 30 molecules have been identified in cometary atmospheres from remote sensing observations from ground or from space platforms. Thanks to progresses in instrumentation and the availability of large telescopes, complex organic molecules have been identified. Measurements will be reviewed and the observed chemical diversity among comets will be presented. The relative abundances will be compared to values measured in star-forming regions to discuss the possible formation routes of cometary molecules. The talk will also include new findings about comet composition obtained from the Rosetta mission to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Video

Loading the player...
14/02/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Measuring magnetic fields in high-redshift galaxies
Aritra Basu (Uni Bielefeld)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Superfluid Dark Matter
Lasha Berezhiani (LMU)

Abstract

I will talk about a novel theory of dark matter superfluidity that matches the success of LCDM model on cosmological scales while simultaneously reproducing the MOND phenomenology on galactic scales.

13/02/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — The Gravitational Universe
Michele Heurs (Leibniz Univ. Hannover)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Black holes and the stellar populations of massive galaxies
Ignacio Martín Navarro (UCSC, Santa Cruz & MPIA, Heidelberg)

Abstract

Black holes are a fundamental ingredient in our current understanding of galaxy formation. In the absence of their feedback, state-of-the-art numerical simulations fail to match the observed properties of massive galaxies. Effectively, within a Lambda Cold Dark Matter Universe, black holes reconcile cosmology and galaxy formation theories by regulating baryonic processes. However, despite this widely-accepted and fundamental role, evidence of black hole regulated star formation remains elusive. I will present our observational efforts to characterize and understand the interplay between black hole activity and star formation, based on detailed stellar populations analyses. Our observations show that black hole and stellar population properties are tightly related, calling for a rich and complex observational framework where star formation, black holes, and chemical enrichment evolve coupled in time.

12/02/18 (Monday)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Fabrizio Arrigoni Battaia (ESO)
View slides |

Abstract

The hydrogen Lyman-alpha line is extremely important in many fields of astrophysics. In particular, this UV line is conveniently redshifted to the visible and near infrared wavelength ranges for high-redshift objects, making it observable from the ground. The hydrogen Lyman-alpha thus provides the main observational window on the formation and evolution of high redshift galaxies. However, this resonant line undergoes complex radiation transfer effects, which need careful modelling in order to extract information on the kinematics and geometry of the gas. This information is thus enclosed in the line shape. In this lesson I will briefly introduce the emission mechanisms for this line and explain the resonant scattering process.

09/02/18 (Friday)
11:00, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Galactic winds and the cooling flow problem - one solution to both problems?
Christoph Pfrommer (Leibniz-Institut fur Astrophysik Potsdam and Potsdam University)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPE Colloquium
Talk — Results from a Joint IFU-Interferometric Survey: Molecular Gas in Nearby Galaxies through the EDGE-CALIFA Survey
Dyas Utomo (Ohio State University)
08/02/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — How cosmic rays shape galaxies and galaxy clusters
Christoph Pfrommer (Leibniz-Institut fur Astrophysik Potsdam and Potsdam University)

Abstract

Understanding the physics of galaxy formation is an outstanding problem in modern astrophysics.

Recent cosmological simulations have demonstrated that feedback by star formation, supernovae and active galactic nuclei appears to be critical in obtaining realistic disk galaxies and to slow down star formation to the small observed rates. However in particular physical processes underlying these feedback processes still remain elusive. In particular, these simulations neglected magnetic fields and relativistic particle populations (so-called cosmic rays). Those are known to provide a pressure support comparable to the thermal gas in our Galaxy and couple dynamically and thermally to the gas, which seriously questions their neglect.

After introducing the underlying physical concepts, I will present our recent efforts to model cosmic ray physics in galaxy formation. I will demonstrate that cosmic rays play a decisive role on all scales relevant for the formation of galaxies, from individual supernova remnants up to scales relevant for entire galaxies and even galaxy clusters.

11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — Growing evidence for a merger within the extended halo of radio galaxy, MRC 0943-242
Sthabile Kolwa (ESO)
07/02/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Cosmological weak gravitational lensing with KiDS+VIKING
Hendrik Hildebrandt (Uni Bonn)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Informal Discussion
Talk — Isotopic lines of dense gas tracers in nearby galaxies
Junzhi Wang (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory)

Abstract

I will introduce some results and on-going project of observing multiple transition isotopic lines of dense gas tracers toward nearby galaxies, which can help us to determine optical depth of dense molecular gas and other parameters.

06/02/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Signals From Neutron-Star Mergers and GW170817
Thomas Janka (MPA)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Hunting modified gravity and neutrinos with clusters of galaxies
Steffen Hagstotz (USM)
11:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Cosmology Seminar
Talk — Deciphering the Lyman-alpha line
Max Gronke (UCSB)
05/02/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Probing neutrino mass and searching for sterile neutrinos with KATRIN
Susanne Mertens (MPP)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — General Relativistic Neutrino Transport
Ninoy Rahman (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — Nuclear transients seen by OGLE and Gaia - CANCELED
Aleksandra Hamanowicz (ESO)
02/02/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Summary of the Conference "Asymmetric Planetary Nebulae VII" (Hong Kong, China, 4th – 8th Dec)
Lisa Löbling (ESO)
01/02/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The Ages of (the Oldest) Stars
Márcio Catelan (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile)
Download video |

Abstract

Deriving accurate ages of stars is one of the most important, if elusive, goals of modern-day astrophysics.

In this talk, I will review some of the techniques that have been used to infer such ages, with emphasis on the oldest stars. Recent applications to stellar clusters and field stars alike will be critically discussed, as will the implications of this work for different areas of astrophysics.

Video

Loading the player...
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Phosphorus-bearing molecules in massive Star-Forming clouds
Francesco Fontani (INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri)

January 2018

31/01/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Star formation in the Vela region traced by Gaia
Veronica Roccatagliata (Arcetri Astr. Observatory, Florence)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Binary Driven Spiral Arms in a Protoplanetary Disk
Kevin Wagner (University of Arizona)

Abstract

We report new results from our study of the disk structure and evolution in the spiral protoplanetary disk hosting binary, HD 100453. This disk represents the only known “grand-design” (two-armed) spiral protoplanetary disk in which a low-mass companion has also been detected. We present the first constraints on the companion’s orbit, utilizing data from VLT/NACO, VLT/SPHERE, and Magellan/MagAO. We also constrain the disk inclination from ALMA 12CO observations and gas kinematic modeling. We find that the companion’s orbital semi-major axis (105±15 au) is 3-4 times greater than the observed extent of the disk, and that the companion orbits in the same plane of the disk to within measurable limits (±10º) on a low eccentricity orbit (e<0.3), in accordance with a classical disk truncation scenario. We utilized these constraints on the system geometry in combined hydrodynamic and radiative transfer simulations, and find in all cases that the companion generates a prominent two-armed spiral pattern in the simulated disk imaging that is in qualitative agreement with the observed disk structure. This system represents a benchmark in understanding the formation of spiral arms in protoplanetary disks, and has implications for on-going planet searches in the other two similar disks that do not host binary companions, but nevertheless host similar spiral structures.

30/01/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — "Life of pi" or Searching for new properties and rare species of light mesons
Stephan Paul (TUM)

Abstract

The rich research program of the COMPASS experiment at CERN comprises the longitudinal and transverse spin structure of the nucleon and precision measurements with pions. The presentation will focus on low energy pi-photon interactions and diffraction production of light mesons addressing exotic states. The measurements allow quantitative comparisons with modern calculations using chiral effective field theory. The presentation will also address novel spectroscopic techniques for multi-hadron final states, reveal their analysis power and anticipates applications for future analysis of heavy mesons decays at B-factories.

29/01/18 (Monday)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Discovering hidden treasures in the noise - an angular correlation study of the X-ray background
Alexander Kolodzig (MPA)
14:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — The Square Kilometre Array: understanding the history of the Universe
Philip Diamond (Director General of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Organisation)
10:45, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
KES: Knowledge Exchange Series
Celine Peroux (ESO)
View slides |

Abstract

The baryon cycle refers to the complex physical processes by which gas travels into, through, and out of galaxies. In this lecture, I will first review simulation and observational results which, together, have provided important fresh clues on the physics of galactic gas flows. I will then discuss prospects of detecting the circumgalactic medium in emission and other future progress which will likely impact galaxy formation studies at all cosmic epochs.

26/01/18 (Friday)
11:00, MPE room III X2 209 | ESO Garching
Cluster Universe Colloquium
Talk — Supernova Hydrodynamics and Nucleosynthesis: What do they tell us?
Shing-Chi Leung (IPMU/Kavli Inst. Kashiwanoha/Tokyo)
25/01/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — The Evolution of the Intra-Cluster Light in the era of LSST
Chris Collins (Liverpool John Moores University)

Abstract

Understanding the evolution of baryonic mass at the centers of clusters is critical if we are to form a consensus on the evolution of structure. I will argue that while the growth and properties of Brightest Cluster Galaxies are becoming better understood through a range of surveys, the growth of the (hard-to-detect) intra-cluster light (ICL) is currently poorly constrained, despite the fact that the ICL makes up a significant fraction of the photospheric light in clusters. I will look at some of the challenges to ICL work using existing public survey pipelines, including HSC, and the techniques we have developed to overcome them. Finally, I will take a brief look at the prospects of similar science with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). With its unique combination of depth (five magnitudes deeper than SDSS) and area (20,000deg^2) LSST can reveal assembly histories of galaxies and the ICL with appropriate sky estimation techniques.

11:10, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
AGN Club
Talk — Evidence for positive AGN feedback and quenching through gas depletion
Allison W. S. Man (ESO)
24/01/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — From Disks to Planetary Atmospheres
Thomas Henning (MPIA, Heidelberg)
10:00, Cluster Building, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching | ESO Garching
Universe Tutorial
Talk — Tutorial: Beyond the Standard Model with "flavio"
David Straub (Universe Cluster, TUM)
23/01/18 (Tuesday)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Improving Our View of the z>6 Universe with Dust Laws, Lensed Galaxies, and A Candidate Spatially Resolved Arc at z~10
Brett Salmon (Space Telescope Science Institute - STScI)

Abstract

The most distant galaxies known are at z~10-11, observed 400-500 Myr after the Big Bang. The few z~10-11 candidates discovered to date have been exceptionally small— barely resolved, if at all, by the Hubble Space Telescope. In this talk I will present the discovery of SPT0615-JD, a fortuitous z~10 galaxy candidate stretched into an arc over 2.5” by the effects of strong gravitational lensing. Discovered in the Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey (RELICS) Hubble and Spitzer program, this candidate has a lensed H-band magnitude of 25.7 AB mag and lensing magnification of 4-7. The unprecedented lensed size of this z~10 candidate offers the potential for the James Webb Space Telescope to study the geometric and kinematic properties of a galaxy observed 500 Myr after the Big Bang. I will also present the sample of bright, lensed galaxy candidates at z>6 found in RELICS, that include other rare high-z arcs. Finally, I will discuss how we can improve our estimates of high-z SFRs by constraining the shape of the dust-attenuation law in individual galaxies.

12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — What the Sub-mm Variability of Embedded Protostars Tells Us about Accretion: Past,Present, and Future
Doug Johnstone (NRC-Canada Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics)
22/01/18 (Monday)
17:15, LMU H030, Schellingstr. 4, Munich | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Does symmetry arise from the algorithmic nature of evolution?
Ard Louis (Univ. of Oxford)
15:30, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
MPA Institute Seminar
Talk — Rise and shine: Type Ia Supernovae at early times
Ulrich Noebauer (MPA)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — HeII and CIV emission around a z~3.3 radio-quiet quasar: discovery of a dual AGN
Fabrizio Arrigoni Battaia (ESO)
19/01/18 (Friday)
14:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Stellar Coffee and Planetary Tea
Talk — Abundance tomography of peculiar thermonuclear SNe
Barnabas Barna (ESO)

Abstract

Although there are promising explosion scenarios for explaining the observational attributes of thermonuclear supernovae, the calculated chemical structures vary on a wide scale. Constraining the chemical abundances in the supernova atmosphere could allow a powerful tool to test the different theories. Using the method of abundance tomography, we define a multi-layer synthetic atmosphere, where the fractions of the chemical elements are fitting parameters in each velocity shell. The modeling of the supernova spectra obtained at different epochs scans through the optically thin region of the atmosphere and provides the abundance distribution of the ejecta.Only a few studies based on abundance tomography were published, and Type Iax SNe were not the subject of this kind of analysis until now. The members of this subclass are peculiar thermonuclear explosions showing relatively low peak absolute brightness and low expansion velocities. Because of the wide range of physical properties, SNe Iax offer excellent possibilities to test different explosion scenarios. However, the high number of overlapping spectral features appearing even at early epochs challenges the abundance tomography technique.I present the first results on abundance tomography of Type Iax SNe carried out using the radiative transfer code TARDIS. I also discuss the assumed physical properties and the used fitting process regarding this peculiar class of supernovae. Finally, a possible correlation between the physical parameters and the abundance distribution is shown, together with an outlook on the possible progenitor scenarios.

11:45, MPA Old Lecture Hall 401 | ESO Garching
High Energy Seminar
Talk — Cosmology with SPHEREx: Infrared and Optical All-Sky Survey in 96 spectral channels, 0.5-5 microns
Asantha Cooray (UC Irvine)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
MPE Seminar
Talk — How do galaxies grow throughout cosmic time? Merging vs smooth accretion, an observational perspective
Eric Faustino Jimenez-Andrade (Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Bonn)
18/01/18 (Thursday)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
Universe Awards 2017 Ceremony
Talk — Positron-Annihilation Spectroscopy throughout the Milky Way
Thomas Siegert (MPE)
11:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
Universe Awards 2017 Ceremony
Talk — Higgs Effective Field Theories - Systematics and Applications
Claudius Krause (formerly LMU) (Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Univ. Valencia)
17/01/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, Room 313, MPP, Foehringer Ring 6, Munich | ESO Garching
Special Universe Lecture
Talk — Heavy neutrinos in particle physics and cosmology (part 2)
Marco Drewes (Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Belgium)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Protoplanetary Disk Evolution: The Key to Planet Formation
Carlo Manara (ESO)
16/01/18 (Tuesday)
16:15, MPP, Freimann, Munich | ESO Garching
MPP Kolloquium
Talk — Supernova cosmology
Bruno Leibundgut (ESO)
14:00, Auditorium, MPI Physics, Foehringer Ring, Munich | ESO Garching
Special Universe Lecture
Talk — Heavy neutrinos in particle physics and cosmology (part 1)
Marco Drewes (Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Belgium)
12:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
Lunch Talk
Talk — Survival in galaxy clusters: from ultra-diffuse to ultra-compact objects
Thorsten Lisker (ARI, Heidelberg University)

Abstract

The diversity of low-mass cluster galaxies in terms of their size and stellar content is striking. So-called ultra-diffuse galaxies residing in the core of a massive galaxy cluster appear surprisingly intact and might be protected by a large dark matter content. Ultra-compact objects, on the other hand, were proposed to be remnant nuclei of disrupted dwarf galaxies, but no tidal debris is found in their vicinity. The stellar age gradients of "normal" cluster dwarfs suggest that ram pressure stripping played an important role in their evolution - yet that alone cannot explain the systematically different angular momentum content of late-type and early-type dwarfs. In this talk I am going to present our latest observational efforts to tackle these problems,along with comparisons to simulations that can shed light upon the galaxies' evolutionary history.

15/01/18 (Monday)
17:15, TUM Physik, Garching | ESO Garching
Muenchener Physik Kolloquium
Talk — Tokamak and stellarator - two concepts for a fusion power plant
Sibylle Guenter (IPP)
12:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18a | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — Column density PDF of molecular clouds
Sayantan Auddy (University of Western Ontario)
12/01/18 (Friday)
14:00, MPA Large Seminar Room E.0.11 (MPA, Garching) | ESO Garching
Bayes Forum
Talk — ROSAT and XMMSLEW2 counterparts using Nway - An accurate algorithm to pairsources simultaneously between N
Mara Salvato (MPE)
11/01/18 (Thursday)
15:15, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
Talk — Multifacetted Neutron Stars
Andrei Beloborodov (Columbia University)

Abstract

Neutron stars are compact remnants of supernova explosions. They have radii of 10-15 km and masses comparable to that of the sun. One could expect neutron stars to be quiet, dead remnants of stellar evolution. Instead,they happen to produce most spectacular, extreme radiative phenomena. This talk will give a broad overview of neutron star activities and recent progress in understanding their mechanisms. Neutron stars generate powerful beams of coherent radio waves, pulsed high-energy gamma-rays, relativistic electron-positron winds, and giant X-ray flares. Some neutron stars live in binary systems and eventually merge, emitting strong gravitational waves and creating explosions observed from cosmological distances. Recent observational discoveries will be discussed, including the exciting detection of gravitational waves from a neutron star merger and its electromagnetic counterpart.

12:30, Auditorium Eridanus (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Special Talk
Talk — KMTNet, Spitzer, High_Resolution: The Future of Microlensing
Andrew Gould (MPIA, KASI, OSU)

Abstract

I discuss the rapid recent progress in microlensing, which is primarily driven by access to new instrumentation and facilities, including the new3-Telescope Korea Microlensing Telescope Network, and the 5-year dedicated Spitzer microlensing campaign.  New results include a turnover in the planet mass function for cold planets that is an order of magnitude more massive than for hot/warm planets, new limits and possible detection of free-floating planets, beginning probes of the Galactic distribution of planets and more.  Future advances in instrumentation, including high-resolution imaging at EELT and a dedicated WFIRST microlensing survey will open new possibilities.

10/01/18 (Wednesday)
14:00, MPE Seminar Room 1.1.18b | ESO Garching
CAS Seminar
Talk — First results from the Nanocosmos project: Study of Carbon chemistry in the laboratory
Jose Cernicharo (ICMM-CSIC, Madrid)
14:00, USM, Scheinerstr. 1, Munich | ESO Garching
USM Colloquium
Talk — Exploring higher-order correlations of the cosmic web with Minkowski Functionals
Alexander Wiegand (MPA)
09/01/18 (Tuesday)
10:00, Tucana (ESO HQE, Garching) | ESO Garching
Star and Planet Formation Seminar
Talk — Tracing intermediate/low mass young stellar populations in the MCs
Viktor Zivkov (ESO)

Abstract

The Magellanic Clouds are a nearby template for low-metallicity,gas-rich galaxies and thus represent an excellent opportunity to study star formation under conditions different from our Galaxy. Using near-infrared data from the VISTA Magellanic Cloud (VMC) survey we developed a method which identifies young stellar populations down to~1Msun. This opens the possibility to sample and characterize these populations across the low metallicity environment of the Magellanic Clouds. I will present the method and show the results we obtained from our pilot field (900 x 1260 pc), with a particular focus on pre main-sequence stars. We will discuss the distribution of the PMS population and analyze the revealed stellar structures. Finally, I will also compare the PMS distribution with the dust emission observed byHerschel and Spitzer.

08/01/18 (Monday)
11:00, Library (ESO HQ, Garching) | ESO Garching
ESO/MPA/MPE "Gas Matters" Club
Talk — Ionized and molecular gas kinematics in a z=1.4 star-forming galaxy
Hannah Übler (MPE)