Note added 3 August 2010: The exoplanet–lithium link debate continues with a new result by Baumann et al. (2010), who argue that the levels of lithium in these Sun-like stars can be explained by an age-related effect, and furthermore that the lithium levels do not behave differently in stars with known planets. Read more in the ESO announcement ann1046.

eso0942-en-au — Science Release

Exoplanets Clue to Sun's Curious Chemistry

11 November 2009

A ground-breaking census of 500 stars, 70 of which are known to host planets, has successfully linked the long-standing “lithium mystery” observed in the Sun to the presence of planetary systems. Using ESO’s successful HARPS spectrograph, a team of astronomers has found that Sun-like stars that host planets have destroyed their lithium much more efficiently than “planet-free” stars. This finding does not only shed light on the lack of lithium in our star, but also provides astronomers with a very efficient way of finding stars with planetary systems.

For almost 10 years we have tried to find out what distinguishes stars with planetary systems from their barren cousins,” says Garik Israelian, lead author of a paper appearing this week in the journal Nature. “We have now found that the amount of lithium in Sun-like stars depends on whether or not they have planets.”

Low levels of this chemical element have been noticed for decades in the Sun, as compared to other solar-like stars, and astronomers have been unable to explain the anomaly. The discovery of a trend among planet-bearing stars provides a natural explanation to this long-standing mystery. “The explanation of this 60 year-long puzzle is for us rather simple,” adds Israelian. “The Sun lacks lithium because it has planets.”

This conclusion is based on the analysis of 500 stars, including 70 planet-hosting stars. Most of these stars were monitored for several years with ESO’s High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher. This spectrograph, better known as HARPS, is attached to ESO's 3.6-metre telescope and is the world’s foremost exoplanet hunter. “This is the best possible sample available to date to understand what makes planet-bearing stars unique,” says co-author Michel Mayor.

The astronomers looked in particular at Sun-like stars, almost a quarter of the whole sample. They found that the majority of stars hosting planets possess less than 1% of the amount of lithium shown by most of the other stars. “Like our Sun, these stars have been very efficient at destroying the lithium they inherited at birth,” says team member Nuno Santos. “Using our unique, large sample, we can also prove that the reason for this lithium reduction is not related to any other property of the star, such as its age.”

Unlike most other elements lighter than iron, the light nuclei of lithium, beryllium and boron are not produced in significant amounts in stars. Instead, it is thought that lithium, composed of just three protons and four neutrons, was mainly produced just after the Big Bang, 13.7 billion years ago. Most stars will thus have the same amount of lithium, unless this element has been destroyed inside the star.

This result also provides the astronomers with a new, cost-effective way to search for planetary systems: by checking the amount of lithium present in a star astronomers can decide which stars are worthy of further significant observing efforts.

Now that a link between the presence of planets and curiously low levels of lithium has been established, the physical mechanism behind it has to be investigated. “There are several ways in which a planet can disturb the internal motions of matter in its host star, thereby rearrange the distribution of the various chemical elements and possibly cause the destruction of lithium. It is now up to the theoreticians to figure out which one is the most likely to happen,” concludes Mayor.

More information

This research was presented in a paper that appears in the 12 November 2009 issue of Nature (Enhanced lithium depletion in Sun-like stars with orbiting planets, by G. Israelian et al.).

The team is composed of Garik Israelian, Elisa Delgado Mena, Carolina Domínguez Cerdeña, and Rafael Rebolo (Instituto de Astrofisíca de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain), Nuno Santos and Sergio Sousa (Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade de Porto, Portugal), Michel Mayor and Stéphane Udry (Observatoire de Genève, Switzerland), and Sofia Randich (INAF, Osservatorio di Arcetri, Firenze, Italy).

ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning a 42-metre European Extremely Large optical/near-infrared Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.

Links

Contacts

Garik Israelian
Insitituto de Astrofisica de Canarias
Tenerife, Spain
Tel: +34 922 60 5258
Email: gil@iac.es

Nuno Santos
Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto
Porto, Portugal
Tel: +351 226 089 893
Email: Nuno.Santos@astro.up.pt

Sergio Sousa
Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto
Porto, Portugal
Email: sousasag@astro.up.pt

Michel Mayor
Observatory of Geneva University
Geneva, Switzerland
Tel: +41 22 379 22 00
Email: Michel.Mayor@obs.unige.ch

Stéphane Udry
Observatory of Geneva University
Geneva, Switzerland
Email: Stephane.Udry @obs.unige.ch

This is a translation of ESO Press Release eso0942.

About the Release

Release No.:eso0942-en-au
Legacy ID:PR 42/09
Facility:ESO 3.6-metre telescope
Science data:2009Natur.462..189I

Images

Burning lithium inside a star (artist's impression)
Burning lithium inside a star (artist's impression)

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