Picture of the Week

Subscribe to esonews mailing list.
potw1310-en-ie — Picture of the Week
Comets and Shooting Stars Dance Over Paranal
11 March 2013: This impressive picture was taken on 5 March 2013 by Gabriel Brammer, one of the ESO Photo Ambassadors, and shows a sunset view of the Paranal Observatory, featuring two comets that are currently moving across the southern skies. Close to the horizon, on the right-hand side of the image, Comet C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS), the brightest of the two, shows a bright tail that is caused mainly by dust reflecting the sunlight. In the centre of the image, just above the right-hand slopes of Cerro Paranal, the greenish coma — a nebulous envelope around the nucleus — of Comet C/2012 F6 (Lemmon) can be distinguished, followed by a fainter tail. The green colour is a result of the ionisation of gases in the coma by sunlight. You might even be tricked into thinking that there is a third comet visible in this photo, but the bright object whizzing between comets Lemmon and ...
potw1309-en-ie — Picture of the Week
Snow Comes to the Atacama Desert
4 March 2013: The Atacama Desert is one of the driest places in the world. Several factors contribute to its arid conditions. The magnificent Andes mountain range and the Chilean Coast Range block the clouds from the east and west, respectively. In addition, the cold offshore Humboldt Current in the Pacific Ocean, which creates a coastal inversion layer of cool air, hinders the formation of rain clouds. Moreover, a region of high pressure in the south-eastern Pacific Ocean creates circulating winds, forming an anticyclone, which also helps to keep the climate of the Atacama Desert dry. These arid conditions were a major factor for ESO in placing the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal, in the Atacama Desert. At the Paranal Observatory, located on the summit of Cerro Paranal, the precipitation levels are usually below ten millimetres per year, with the humidity often dropping below 10%. The observational conditions are excellent, with over ...
potw1308-en-ie — Picture of the Week
The Comet and the Laser
25 February 2013: Gerhard Hüdepohl, one of the ESO Photo Ambassadors, captured this spectacular image of ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) during the testing of a new laser for the VLT 14 February 2013. It will be used as a vital part of the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF), which allows astronomers to correct for most of the disturbances caused by the constant movement of the atmosphere in order to create much sharper images. Nevertheless, is hard not to think of it as a futuristic laser cannon being pointed towards some kind of distant space invader. As well as the amazing view of the Milky Way seen over the telescope, there is another feature making this picture even more special. To the right of the centre of the image, just below the Small Magellanic Cloud and almost hidden among the myriad stars seen in the dark Chilean sky, there is a green dot with a faint tail ...
potw1307-en-ie — Picture of the Week
Super-thin Mirror Under Test at ESO
18 February 2013: This remarkable deformable thin-shell mirror has been delivered to ESO at Garching, Germany and is shown undergoing tests. It is 1120 millimetres across but just 2 millimetres thick, making it much thinner than most glass windows. The mirror is very thin so that it is flexible enough for magnetic forces applied to it to alter the shape of its reflective surface. When in use, the mirror's surface will be constantly changed by tiny amounts to correct for the blurring effects of the Earth’s atmosphere and so create much sharper images. The new deformable secondary mirror (DSM) will replace the current secondary in one of the VLT’s four Unit Telescopes. The entire secondary structure includes a set of 1170 actuators that apply a force on 1170 magnets glued to the back face of the thin shell. Sophisticated special-purpose electronics control the behaviour of the thin shell mirror. The reflecting surface can ...
potw1306-en-ie — Picture of the Week
Laser and Light Painting
11 February 2013: On a clear night in Bavaria, ESO staff attended the filming of an ESOcast episode focusing on ESO’s new compact laser guide star unit, seen here in action at the Allgäu Public Observatory in Ottobeuren, Germany. Using the glow from their mobile phones, staff took advantage of the long-exposure photograph to draw the letters “ESO” in light, while standing in front of the observatory. Just left of the vertical laser beam, the Milky Way can be seen. Just above the horizon over the observatory, the dotted tracks of aircraft can be seen in the distance. The laser has a powerful beam of 20 watts, and to protect pilots and passengers a no-fly zone around the observatory was created by the Deutsche Flugsicherung (responsible for air traffic control in Germany) during the nighttime observing hours. Laser guide stars are artificial stars created in the Earth’s atmosphere using a laser beam. The ...
potw1305-en-ie — Picture of the Week
Sunset at Paranal Observatory
4 February 2013: Babak Tafreshi, an ESO Photo Ambassador, has captured a beautiful image of ESO’s Paranal Observatory illuminated by the sunset. The beautifully clear sky hints at the exceptional atmospheric conditions here; one major reason why ESO chose Paranal as the site of the Very Large Telescope (VLT), its flagship facility.The VLT — which can be seen on Cerro Paranal, the highest peak in the image, with an altitude of 2600 metres —  is the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory. It consists of four Unit Telescopes, each with a primary mirror 8.2 metres across, and four 1.8-metre Auxiliary Telescope. The VLT operates at visible and infrared wavelengths and among the pioneering observations carried out using the VLT have been the first direct image of an exoplanet (see eso0515) and the tracking of stars orbiting the Milky Way’s central black hole (see eso0846 and eso1151). Also on Cerro Paranal is the VLT ...
potw1304-en-ie — Picture of the Week
An Intergalactic Heavyweight
28 January 2013: This deep-field image shows what is known as a supercluster of galaxies — a giant group of galaxy clusters which are themselves clustered together. This one, known as Abell 901/902, comprises three separate main clusters and a number of filaments of galaxies, typical of such super-structures. One cluster, Abell 901a, can be seen above and just to the right of the prominent red foreground star near the middle of the image. Another, Abell 901b, is further to the right of Abell 901a, and slightly lower. Finally, the cluster Abell 902 is directly below the red star, towards the bottom of the image. The Abell 901/902 supercluster is located a little over two billion light-years from Earth, and contains hundreds of galaxies in a region about 16 million light-years across. For comparison, the Local Group of galaxies — which contains our Milky Way among more than 50 others — measures roughly ...
potw1303-en-ie — Picture of the Week
APEX Under the Moon
21 January 2013: Another starry night on the Chajnantor Plateau in the Chilean Andes. The first quarter Moon glows brightly in this exposure, outshining the surrounding celestial objects. However, for radio telescopes such as APEX (the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment), seen here, the brightness of the Moon is not a problem for observations. In fact, since the Sun itself is not too bright at radio wavelengths, and these wavelengths do not brighten the sky in the same way, this telescope can even be used during the daytime, as long as it is not pointed towards the Sun. APEX is a 12-metre-diameter telescope that observes light at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. Astronomers observing with APEX can see phenomena which would be invisible at the shorter wavelengths of infrared or visible light. For instance, APEX can peer through dense interstellar clouds of gas and cosmic dust, revealing hidden regions of ongoing star formation which glow brightly ...
potw1302-en-ie — Picture of the Week
ALMA Dwarfed by Mountain Peaks
14 January 2013: At first glance, this view shows the mountainous scenery of Chile’s Chajnantor Plateau, with snow and ice scattered over the barren terrain. The main peaks from right to left are Cerro Chajnantor, Cerro Toco, Juriques, and the distinctive conical volcano Licancabur (see potw1240) —  impressive enough! However, the true stars of the picture are the tiny, barely visible structures in the very centre of the image — perceptible if you squint hard enough. These structures, dwarfed by their mountainous neighbours, are the antennas that form the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), a large radio telescope. While it may appear minute in this image, the array is actually composed of a collection of large 12- and 7-metre-diameter antennas, and when it’s complete, there will be a total of 66 of them, spread over distances of up to 16 kilometres across the plateau. Construction work for ALMA is expected to finish in ...
potw1301-en-ie — Picture of the Week
Swirling Star Trails Over Yepun
7 January 2013: This view shows one of the Unit Telescopes of ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) sitting beneath bright star trails circling the south celestial pole, a point in the sky that lies in the southern constellation of Octans (The Octant). These trails are arcs of light that trace out a star’s observed movement across the sky as the Earth slowly rotates. To capture these star trails on camera, many exposures were taken over time and combined to give the final appearance of circular tracks. Illuminated by moonlight, the telescope in the foreground is just one of the four Unit Telescopes (UTs) that make up the VLT at Paranal, Chile. Following the inauguration of the Paranal site in 1999, each UT was named in the language of the native Mapuche tribe. The names of the UTs — Antu, Kueyen, Melipal, and Yepun — represent four prominent and beautiful features of the sky: ...
potw1253-en-ie — Picture of the Week
Whirling Southern Star Trails over ALMA
31 December 2012: Babak Tafreshi, one of the ESO Photo Ambassadors, has captured the antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) under the southern sky in another breathtaking image. The dramatic whorls of stars in the sky are reminiscent of van Gogh’s Starry Night, or — for science fiction fans — perhaps the view from a spacecraft about to enter hyperspace. In reality, though, they show the rotation of the Earth, revealed by the photograph’s long exposure. In the southern hemisphere, as the Earth turns, the stars appear to move in circles around the south celestial pole, which lies in the dim constellation of Octans (The Octant), between the more famous Southern Cross and the Magellanic Clouds. With a long enough exposure, the stars mark out circular trails as they move. The photograph was taken on the Chajnantor Plateau, at an altitude of 5000 metres in the Chilean Andes. This is the ...
potw1252-en-ie — Picture of the Week
ALMA’s Solitude
24 December 2012: This panoramic view of the Chajnantor Plateau shows the site of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), taken from near the peak of Cerro Chico. Babak Tafreshi, an ESO Photo Ambassador, has succeeded in capturing the feeling of solitude experienced at the ALMA site, 5000 metres above sea level in the Chilean Andes. Light and shadow paint the landscape, enhancing the otherworldly appearance of the terrain. In the foreground of the image, clustered ALMA antennas look like a crowd of strange, robotic visitors to the plateau. When the telescope is completed in 2013, there will be a total of 66 such antennas in the array, operating together. ALMA is already revolutionising how astronomers study the Universe at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. Even with a partial array of antennas, ALMA is more powerful than any previous telescope at these wavelengths, giving astronomers an unprecedented capability to study the cool Universe — ...
potw1251-en-ie — Picture of the Week
Paranal and the Shadow of the Earth
17 December 2012: ESO Photo Ambassador, Babak Tafreshi has taken another outstanding panoramic photograph of ESO’s Paranal Observatory. In the foreground is the dramatic, mountainous landscape of the Atacama Desert. On the left, on the highest peak, is the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), and in front of it, on a slightly lower peak, is the VISTA telescope (Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy). In the background, the sunrise colours Paranal’s sky with a beautiful pastel palette. Extending beyond the horizon, the sea of clouds over the Pacific Ocean — which lies only 12 kilometres from Paranal — is visible. Above the horizon, where the sea of clouds meets the sky, a dark band can be seen. This dark band is the Earth’s shadow, cast by the planet onto its atmosphere. This phenomenon can sometimes be seen around the times of sunset and sunrise, if the sky is clear and the horizon ...
potw1250-en-ie — Picture of the Week
The Stars Streak Overhead
10 December 2012: Although this image might at first look like abstract modern art, it is in fact the result of a long camera exposure of the night sky over the Chajnantor Plateau in the Chilean Andes. As the Earth rotates towards another day, the stars of the Milky Way above the desert stretch into colourful streaks. The high-tech telescope in the foreground, meanwhile, takes on a dreamlike quality. This mesmerising photo was taken 5000 metres above sea level on the Chajnantor Plateau, home of the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, which is seen here. APEX is a 12-metre-diameter telescope which collects light with wavelengths in the millimetre and submillimetre range. Astronomers use APEX to study objects ranging from the cold clouds of gas and cosmic dust where new stars are being born, to some of the earliest and most distant galaxies in the Universe. APEX is a pathfinder for the Atacama Large ...
potw1248-en-ie — Picture of the Week
Two Planet-hunters Snapped at La Silla
26 November 2012: For centuries, philosophers and scientists have wondered about the possibility of habitable planets outside the Solar System. Today, this idea is more than speculation: many hundreds of exoplanets have been discovered over the last couple of decades, by astronomers all over the world. Various different techniques are used in this search for new worlds. In this unusual photograph, telescopes using two of these methods, the ESO 3.6-metre telescope with the HARPS spectrograph, and the space telescope CoRoT, have been captured in the same shot. The photograph was taken by Alexandre Santerne, an astronomer who studies exoplanets himself. The High Accuracy Radial velocity Planetary Search (HARPS) spectrograph, the world’s foremost exoplanet hunter, is an instrument on ESO’s 3.6-metre telescope. The open dome of this telescope can be seen on the left of this image, behind the angular enclosure of the New Technology Telescope. HARPS finds exoplanets by detecting small changes in ...
potw1247-en-ie — Picture of the Week
APEX's Icy Companions
19 November 2012: The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope — captured in this dramatic image taken by ESO Photo Ambassador Babak Tafreshi — is one of the tools used by ESO to peer beyond the realm of visible light. It is located on the Chajnantor Plateau at an altitude of 5000 metres. Clusters of white penitentes can be seen in the foreground of the photograph. The penitentes (Spanish for penitents) are a curious natural phenomenon found in high altitude regions, typically more than 4000 metres above sea level. They are thin spikes of hardened snow or ice, with their blades pointing towards the Sun, attaining heights from a few centimetres up to several metres. APEX is a 12-metre-diameter telescope that observes light at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. Astronomers observing with APEX can see phenomena which would be invisible at shorter wavelengths. The telescope enables them to study molecular clouds — the dense regions ...
potw1246-en-ie — Picture of the Week
One Picture, Many Stories
12 November 2012: ESO Photo Ambassador, Babak Tafreshi has captured an outstanding image of the sky over ESO’s Paranal Observatory, with a treasury of deep-sky objects. The most obvious of these is the Carina Nebula, glowing intensely red in the middle of the image.  The Carina Nebula lies in the constellation of Carina (The Keel), about 7500 light-years from Earth. This cloud of glowing gas and dust is the brightest nebula in the sky and contains several of the brightest and most massive stars known in the Milky Way, such as Eta Carinae. The Carina Nebula is a perfect test-bed for astronomers to unveil the mysteries of the violent birth and death of massive stars. For some beautiful recent images of the Carina Nebula from ESO, see eso1208, eso1145, and eso1031. Below the Carina Nebula, we see the Wishing Well Cluster (NGC 3532). This open cluster of young stars was named because, through ...
potw1244-en-ie — Picture of the Week
A Place to Unveil the Mysteries of the Cold Universe
29 October 2012: This beautiful panoramic picture taken by Babak Tafreshi, an ESO Photo Ambassador, shows the last rays of sunlight bathing the Chajnantor Plateau in Chile’s Atacama region. The plateau is the home of the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope, which can be seen on the left of the panorama. From this remote place on Earth, 5000 metres above sea level, APEX studies the “cold Universe”. APEX is a 12-metre-diameter telescope that observes light at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths. Astronomers observing with APEX can see phenomena which would be invisible at shorter wavelengths. The telescope enables them to study molecular clouds — the dense regions of gas and cosmic dust where new stars are being born — which are dark and obscured by dust in visible or infrared light, but which glow brightly at these relatively longer wavelengths. Astronomers use this light to study the chemical and physical conditions in the clouds. ...
potw1242-en-ie — Picture of the Week
From Cosmic Spare Tyre to Ethereal Blossom
15 October 2012: IC 5148 is a beautiful planetary nebula located some 3000 light-years away in the constellation of Grus (The Crane). The nebula has a diameter of a couple of light-years, and it is still growing at over 50 kilometres per second — one of the fastest expanding planetary nebulae known. The term “planetary nebula” arose in the 19th century, when the first observations of such objects — through the small telescopes available at the time — looked somewhat like giant planets. However, the true nature of planetary nebulae is quite different. When a star with a mass similar to or a few times more than that of our Sun approaches the end of its life, its outer layers are thrown off into space. The expanding gas is illuminated by the hot remaining core of the star at the centre, forming the planetary nebula, which often takes on a beautiful, glowing shape.  ...
potw1241-en-ie — Picture of the Week
A VISTA Before Sunset
8 October 2012: ESO’s Paranal Observatory — located in Chile’s Atacama region — is most well known for the Very Large Telescope (VLT), ESO’s flagship telescope facility. However, over the last few years, the site has also become home to two state-of-the-art survey telescopes. These new members of the Paranal family are designed to image large areas of the sky quickly and deeply. One of them, the 4.1-metre Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), is located on a neighbouring peak not far from the Paranal summit. It is shown in this beautiful photograph taken from Paranal by ESO Photo Ambassador, Babak Tafreshi. VISTA is the world’s largest survey telescope, and has been operating since December 2009. At the lower right corner of the image, VISTA’s enclosure appears in front of a seemingly endless mountain range, which stretches to the horizon. As sunset approaches, the mountains cast longer shadows, which slowly cover ...
Showing 81 to 100 of 316
Send us your comments!
Subscribe to ESO News