Seminars and Colloquia at ESO Garching

For ESO and ESO-related Conferences and Workshops in Europe and Chile please check the main Conferences and Workshops page.

November 2014

04.11.14 (Tuesday)
10:00, ESO room "Tucana", Star and Planet Formation seminar
"The physical and temperature structure of the disk-envelope interface: ALMA DCO+ observations of VLA1623"
Nadia Murillo (MPE)
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"The physical and temperature structure of the disk-envelope interface: ALMA DCO+ observations of VLA1623"

Nadia Murillo (MPE)

Abstract
The structure of the transition from the envelope to the rotationally supported disk, the disk-envelope interface, is poorly studied. This is due to instrumental limitations and lack of disk detections in early embedded protostellar systems. To probe this region, both CO isotopologues and freeze-out tracers are needed. VLA1623A is a deeply embedded Class 0 protostar with a confirmed rotationally supported disk extending out to at least 150 AU. This makes VLA1623A an ideal target to study the disk-envelope interface. We model ALMA Cycle 0 observations of DCO+ and C18O towards VLA1623A. An analytic model using a simple chemical network coupled with radial density and temperature profiles is used as input for line radiative transfer modelling. Observations show the DCO+ emission towards VLA1623A to border the C18O emission tracing the disk. Modelling results indicate that a decrease in temperature is needed to reproduce the observed DCO+ emission, while an increase in density reproduces the C18O emission well. Our results show that the physical structure of the disk-envelope interface differs from the rest of the envelope, highlighting the drastic impact that the disk has on the envelope and temperature structure. Finally, our results show that DCO+ is an excellent temperature tracer.
04.11.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Lunch Talk
"Illuminating the Dark Ages: Quasars in the Epoch of Reionisation"
Bram Venemans (MPIA Heidelberg)
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"Illuminating the Dark Ages: Quasars in the Epoch of Reionisation"

Bram Venemans (MPIA Heidelberg)

Abstract
Quasars are the brightest (non-transient) objects observed at the highest redshifts, z>7. Such high redshift quasars are important as detailed analysis of quasar spectra provide unique information about the baryonic and physical condition of the Universe during the epoch of reionisation. Furthermore, the density of high redshift quasars puts powerful constraints on the mechanisms that are required to seed and grow >10^9 Msun supermassive black holes less than a Gyr after the Big Bang. Because these quasars are rare, surveys covering large areas on the sky are required to discover such objects. In this talk I will describe our on-going programme aimed at discovering quasars at the highest redshifts in optical and near-infrared surveys. I will present the results of our multi-wavelength follow-up observations, including mm observations with ALMA and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer of the quasar host galaxies, and discuss the implications for massive galaxy formation at high redshift.
06.11.14 (Thursday)
11:10, ESO Library, AGN Club
"Do AGN share the same relationships between structure and star-formation as galaxies? Insights into the co-evolutionary drivers of AGN activity from CANDELS and Herschel"
David Rosario (MPE)
06.11.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"Cosmology with galaxy redshift surveys"
Gigi Guzzo (Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera)
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"Cosmology with galaxy redshift surveys"

Gigi Guzzo (Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera)

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(available soon)
11.11.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO room "Fornax", Lunch Talk
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Eduardo Banados (MPIA Heidelberg)
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"(topic t.b.a.)"

Eduardo Banados (MPIA Heidelberg)

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13.11.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"How to catch cosmic rays and energetic protostellar winds sources by observing molecules"
Cecilia Cecarelli
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"How to catch cosmic rays and energetic protostellar winds sources by observing molecules"

Cecilia Cecarelli

Abstract
At large scales, Cosmic Rays (CR) permeate our Galaxy and ionise the UV-shielded molecular gas, which makes them crucial actors in shaping the InterStellar Medium (ISM) and governing star and planet formation. At smaller scales, newly born stars are suspected to be sources of energetic protostellar winds, which also affect the planet formation process. For example, traces of some short-lived radionucleides (e.g. 10Be) in meteoritic material suggest that the young Sun emitted an important flux of >MeV particles. These two cases, CR and energetic protostellar winds, have in common the fact that >MeV particles are impossible to directly detect, as they are scattered by the galactic magnetic fields. I will show that cold (<100K) molecules can be used to catch the sources of MeV-GeV particles and study them. Specifically, I will present observations that allowed us to infer the presence of an enhanced flux of CR and their MeV-GeV versus TeV spectrum towards molecular clouds close to some SuperNova Remnant (SNR). Using a similar technique, we revealed large fluxes of >MeV particles, similar to that necessary to explain the meteoritic 10Be presence, in a protocluster system that will eventually form a Solar-like planetary system.
18.11.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO room "Fornax", Lunch Talk
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Roland Bacon (CRAL - Observatoire de Lyon)
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"(topic t.b.a.)"

Roland Bacon (CRAL - Observatoire de Lyon)

Abstract
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20.11.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"Nuclear Activity in Nearby Galaxies: Insights into Accretion and Jet Physics"
Luis Ho
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"Nuclear Activity in Nearby Galaxies: Insights into Accretion and Jet Physics"

Luis Ho

Abstract
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25.11.14 (Tuesday)
12:30, ESO room "Fornax", Lunch Talk
"Particle Physics meets Astrophysics: Astrophysical counterparts of IceCube Neutrinos"
Paolo Padovani (ESO)
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"Particle Physics meets Astrophysics: Astrophysical counterparts of IceCube Neutrinos"

Paolo Padovani (ESO)

Abstract
IceCube has recently reported the discovery of high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin, opening up the PeV (10^15 eV) sky. These observations are challenging to interpret on the astronomical side and have triggered a fruitful collaboration across particle and astro-physics. I will first describe the IceCube experiment and then, by using positional and energetic diagnostics, discuss plausible astronomical counterparts to the neutrino events. These include extragalactic sources, namely BL Lacertae objects, a sub-class of blazars, and Galactic pulsar wind nebulae. I will conclude by addressing the implications of the results and possible ways forward.
27.11.14 (Thursday)
16:15, MPA large seminar room E.0.11, Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"Searching for the origins of galaxy bimodality"
Vivienne Wild (University of St. Andrews, UK)
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"Searching for the origins of galaxy bimodality"

Vivienne Wild (University of St. Andrews, UK)

Abstract
Understanding how and why galaxies form and evolve is one of the most challenging problems in modern astrophysics. Our own galaxy, the Milky Way, shows order and structure, as do most massive galaxies in our local neighbourhood. Yet when we look to very distant galaxies they are disordered and chaotic. One leading theory for the origin of this transformation invokes gas-rich mergers, which trigger massive starbursts leading to bulge and supermassive black hole growth. I will start by reviewing the evidence for and against this scenario. I will then turn to the interesting case of post-starburst galaxies at 0<z<2. How many of these recently quenched descendents of massive starbursts could be the progenitors of modern day red ellipticals, and what fraction of red ellipticals could have been formed through the gas-rich mergers required to trigger such strong starbursts?

December 2014

04.12.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Adam Muzzin
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"(topic t.b.a.)"

Adam Muzzin

Abstract
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11.12.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Jonathan Tan (University of Florida)
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"(topic t.b.a.)"

Jonathan Tan (University of Florida)

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18.12.14 (Thursday)
16:15, ESO auditorium "Telescopium", Munich Joint Astronomy Colloquium
"(topic t.b.a.)"
Julio Navarro
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"(topic t.b.a.)"

Julio Navarro

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2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010