Seminars and Colloquia at ESO/Santiago

For ESO and ESO-related Conferences and Workshops in Europe and Chile please check the main Conferences and Workshops page.


Broadcast of the ESO talks is available upon request.  If anyone is interested, kindly contact us via email
at least 60 min prior  to the beginning of the talk.


June 2015

3.06.15 (Wednesday)
12:00
"The massive stars nursery R136"
Zeinab KHORRAMI (Laboratoire Lagrange – Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur)
Abstract
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"The massive stars nursery R136 "

Zeinab KHORRAMI (Laboratoire Lagrange – Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur)

Abstract

As most stars are born in a clustered mode, young massive star clusters are the best places to find and study the formation and evolution of massive stars. R136 is one of the most massive nearby clusters in the LMC, which contains at least until now 72 known O and Wolf-Rayet stars. These young objects are usually embedded in dust and gas so that correcting the local extinction plays an important role for estimating the mass of stars. The extinction is derived for 26 O-stars in different HST filters using TLUSTY[3] atmosphere model for O-stars. Then we derived the mass and hence the Mass Function (MF) by multicolour photometry from HST data. We also simulated series of R136-like clusters using the Nbody6 code to test the segregation scenario for R136. thus we checked if massive stars tend to be formed locally at the center of a cloud or homogeniously. By comparing the surface brightness profiles (SBP) of simulated clusters mimicking R136’s SBP from HST data, we could determine which scenario is simulated the best R136. the results of these studies bring a new homogenious insight to the understanding of R136 and similar clusters in the light of future VLT and E-ELT high dynamic imaging observations at the diffraction limit in visible and IR wavelengths.

4.06.15 (Thursday)
12:00
"Twenty years of discoveries in Exoplanets: from the first planet to future instrumentation"
Pedro FIGUEIRA (Porto University)
Abstract
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"Twenty years of discoveries in Exoplanets: from the first planet to future instrumentation"

Pedro FIGUEIRA (Porto University)

Abstract

The first exoplanet discovered around a Sun-like star changed our perception of planets both outside and inside our own Solar System. Now, 20 years after this groundbreaking discovery, we know that most stars in the solar neighbourhood host at least a planet, and that Earth-mass planets are the most abundant of all. This opens exciting new venues for research, and currently exoplanets is one of the main drivers for astronomical instrumentation development. In this talk I review some of the key discoveries in the field, and Idiscuss the path that is laid before us. I will focus on current instrumentation projects aiming at detecting at characterizing extrasolar planets, of which I highlight ESPRESSO, SPIRou, and NIRPS.

11.06.15 (Thursday)
12:00
"Unveiling the Massive Stars in the Galactic Centre"
Hui DONG (Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Spain)
Abstract
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"Unveiling the Massive Stars in the Galactic Centre"

Hui DONG (Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Spain)

Abstract

Because of the proximity, the Galactic Centre is a unique lab for studies of the interplay between stars, ISM and super massive black holes in galactic nuclei. The central 200 pc of the Galactic Centre includes 4x10^7 molecular clouds and has a star formation rate of ~0.03 M/yr. Three young, massive and compact star clusters were found and includes around 100 massive stars, which strongly shape the nearby ISM. However, the massive stars beyond the clusters are still unknown. A complete census of these `field' massive stars have an important impact on our understanding of several fundamental astrophysical questions, such as 1) how molecular clouds form stars in this extreme environments, 2) initial massive function and 3) the stellar evolution models for massive stars in high metallicity environment. I will present our effort during these years to identify massive stars in the Galactic Centre and study their properties and origin. Our results show that massive stars pervade the Galactic Centre and they partly formed in situ and partly were ejected from the three clusters.


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