Seminars and Colloquia at ESO/Santiago

For ESO and ESO-related Conferences and Workshops in Europe and Chile please check the main Conferences and Workshops page.


Broadcast of the ESO talks is available upon request.  If anyone is interested, kindly contact us via email
at least 60 min prior  to the beginning of the talk.


February 2015

2.02.15 (Monday)
12:00
"A Fiber-Based Infrared Heterodyne Interferometer - A Proposal for a Chilean Instrumentation Study Platform on the way to an Infrared Planet Formation Imager"
Ernest A. MICHAEL (Universidad de Chile)
Abstract
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"A Fiber-Based Infrared Heterodyne Interferometer - A Proposal for a Chilean Instrumentation Study Platform on the way to an Infrared Planet Formation Imager"

Ernest A. MICHAEL (Universidad de Chile)

Abstract

At the Photonics Lab of the Astronomical Instrumentation Group of U Chile we experimentally develop components for a low-cost fiber-based near-infrared heterodyne stellar interferometer. Our goal for the next time is to demonstrate the principle for one baseline using 1.55mu COTS fiber components, a ROACH board based correlator, and amateur telescopes. The motivation is to develop this then towards a science-relevant small or medium instrument to be used with any two or three telescopes. Because of the heterodyne approach this has then the potential to be extended to larger numbers of telescopes. In front of the vision of the internationally proposed Planet Formation Imager, the talk therefore proposes a pathway of developments which appear practical to be pursued using resources available here in Chile.

3.02.15 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Neutron star X-ray binaries jets: a polarimetric view"
M. Cristina BAGLIO (INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera)
Abstract
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"Neutron star X-ray binaries jets: a polarimetric view"

M. Cristina BAGLIO (INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera)

Abstract

I will present a quick overview of the polarimetric measurements that have been performed on low mass X-Ray binaries to date, focusing particularly on the possible relation between the detection of linearly polarized radiation from such systems and the emission of relativistic particle jets.

9.02.15 (Monday)
12:00
"HARPS-N@TNG: Ushering in the New Frontier of Exoplanetary Science"
Alessandro SOZZETTI (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino - Inaf)
Abstract
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"HARPS-N@TNG: Ushering in the New Frontier of Exoplanetary Science"

Alessandro SOZZETTI (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino - Inaf)

Abstract

The HARPS-N echelle spectrograph on the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo is now well into its second year of science operations. It provides an extremely stable, high-resolution platform at visible wavelengths, enabling the measurement of radial velocities with the highest precision (1 m/s) currently available in the northern hemisphere. There are presently two large observing programmes being executed with HARPS-N that are taking advantage of the unique capabilities of the instrument to undertake cutting-edge science in the realm of extrasolar planetary systems. The Guaranteed Time Observations (GTO) programme of the HARPS-N Consortium (responsible for the instrument's fabrication and operations) is focused on a) the follow-up of small-size transiting planet candidates uncovered by the Kepler mission to establish their nature and to determine accurately their masses, and b) the search for terrestrial planets around a selected sample of bright, nearby solar-type dwarfs. The scientific exploitation of the GTO programme is carried out within the framework of the FP7-SPACE collaborative project ETAEARTH, coordinated by INAF. The Global Architecture of Planetary Systems (GAPS) programme, a large INAF-led effort of the italian scientific community involved in exoplanet science, is composed of three main elements, including 1) radial-velocity searches for low-mass planets around stars with and without known planets and with a broad range of properties (mass, metallicity) of the hosts, 2) characterization measurements of known transiting exoplanet systems, and 3) improved determinations of relevant physical parameters (masses, radii, ages) and of the degree of star-planet interactions for selected planet hosts. I will present recent results from the ongoing GTO radial-velocity campaign with HARPS-N in the Kepler field, and provide an overview of the findings emerging from the pool of the various GAPS programme elements.

16.02.15 (Monday)
15:30
"M67 and the Sun: chemical and dynamical (dis)similarities"
Andreas KORN (Division of Astronomy and Space Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University)
Abstract
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"M67 and the Sun: chemical and dynamical (dis)similarities"

Andreas KORN (Division of Astronomy and Space Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University)

Abstract

I will discuss our on-going work to define the chemical profile of stars in the solar-age, solar-metallicity cluster Messier 67. The remarkable chemical similarity of the first confirmed solar twin in M 67 to the Sun (├ľnehag et al. 2011) made us to tentatively suggest a solar origin as part of this rather unique cluster. But can the dissimilarity of the orbits, in particular the current high Galactic latitude of M 67, be reconciled with this hypothesis? And what about the idea that solar-like abundance profiles reveal the presence of terrestrial planets? M 67 holds key observables for planetary, stellar and Galactic astronomy.

18.02.15 (Wednesday)
15:30
"Optical Aperture Synthesis in Software: Long-baseline intensity interferometry with the Cherenkov Telescope Array"
Dainis DRAVINS (Lund Observatory & ESO Visiting Scientist)
Abstract
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"Optical Aperture Synthesis in Software: Long-baseline intensity interferometry with the Cherenkov Telescope Array"

Dainis DRAVINS (Lund Observatory & ESO Visiting Scientist)

Abstract

Microarcsecond optical imaging requires kilometer-scale interferometers. Intensity interferometry, correlating intensity fluctuations between independent telescopes, circumvents atmospheric turbulence and is immune to telescopic imperfections. The method was demonstrated with an array of small laboratory telescopes, observing artificial stars over 180 optical baselines, reconstructing diffraction-limited images. With no optical connection between telescopes, the technique can be expanded to large arrays, in particular those of air Cherenkov telescopes primarily erected for gamma-ray studies. Such an optical equivalent of ALMA would reveal details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets; Astropart.Phys. 43, 331, 2013; http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927650512001314 .

25.02.15 (Wednesday)
15:30
"Magnetism in massive stars"
Coralie NEINER ()
Abstract
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"Magnetism in massive stars"

Coralie NEINER ()

Abstract

I will present the latest observational results obtained on the magnetic fields of massive stars thanks mainly to the large spectropolarimetric programs MiMeS and BinaMIcS (at TBL, CFHT and ESO). I will discuss the origin of these magnetic fields, their impact on the circumstellar environment and on the internal stellar structure. Finally I will present the space mission project Arago proposed to ESA for simultaneous spectropolarimetry in the UV and visible domains.


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