Seminars and Colloquia at ESO/Santiago

For ESO and ESO-related Conferences and Workshops in Europe and Chile please check the main Conferences and Workshops page.


Broadcast of the ESO talks is available upon request.  If anyone is interested, kindly contact us via email
at least 60 min prior  to the beginning of the talk.


February 2015

23.02.15 (Monday)
12:00
"The X-Shooter large programme TOPOS (Turn-off Primordial stars) : First results"
Patrick FRANÇOIS (Paris-Meudon Observatory)
Abstract
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"The X-Shooter large programme TOPOS (Turn-off Primordial stars) : First results"

Patrick FRANÇOIS (Paris-Meudon Observatory)

Abstract

The extremely metal-poor stars (EMP) hold in their atmospheres the fossil record of the chemical composition of the early phases of the Galactic evolution. The chemical analysis of such objects provides important constraints on these early phases of the Universe. The chemical composition of EMP stars can give insights on the star-formation of low-mass stars from a metal-poor gas and on the masses of the Pop. III first-generation massive stars. EMP stars are very rare objects; to dig them out large amounts of data have to be considered. I will present the first results of an ESO large programme based on X-sooter and UVES spectra. The main aim of this large programme is to search for the most metal poor stars of our Galaxy and to determine their chemical composition.

24.02.15 (Tuesday)
12:00
"Dust formation in SN1987A: when, where and how"
Roger WESSON (ESO)
Abstract
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"Dust formation in SN1987A: when, where and how"

Roger WESSON (ESO)

Abstract

Dust formation in the remnants of core collapse supernovae is predicted to be responsible for a large fraction of the dust present in very young galaxies, but observational studies of nearby supernovae have found typically less than 1 per cent of the dust mass theoretically expected. Supernova 1987A, the closest supernova to Earth in the last 400 years, was detected at submm wavelengths by the Herschel Space Observatory, indicating for the first time a large mass of dust in a young supernova remnant. By constructing radiative transfer models of the expanding ejecta to match a large compilation of observational data over 27 years since the explosion, we can constrain when and where this dust formed. We find that the dust must have formed at very late times, long after dust emission from more distant supernovae would be unobservable. Thus, the low dust masses reported in young SNRs are not representative of the total dust formation, and theory and observations can be reconciled.

25.02.15 (Wednesday)
15:30
"Magnetism in massive stars"
Coralie NEINER (Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, France)
Abstract
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"Magnetism in massive stars"

Coralie NEINER (Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, France)

Abstract

I will present the latest observational results obtained on the magnetic fields of massive stars thanks mainly to the large spectropolarimetric programs MiMeS and BinaMIcS (at TBL, CFHT and ESO). I will discuss the origin of these magnetic fields, their impact on the circumstellar environment and on the internal stellar structure. Finally I will present the space mission project Arago proposed to ESA for simultaneous spectropolarimetry in the UV and visible domains.

26.02.15 (Thursday)
12:00
"The fate of planets around intermediate mass stars"
Carolina BERGFORS (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, UK)
Abstract
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"The fate of planets around intermediate mass stars"

Carolina BERGFORS (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, UK)

Abstract

Planetary systems around evolved stars and white dwarfs provide keys to understanding the history of planet formation in our Galaxy, and their fate - including that of our Solar system. Many white dwarf progenitor stars host planets, and at least some of these survive the stellar post-main sequence evolution. While no planets around single white dwarfs have yet been confirmed, compelling evidence for the existence of such planetary systems comes from the observations of metal polluted atmospheres and dust discs around white dwarfs. I will review observations of white dwarf metal pollution and dust discs, and discuss what these tell us about the composition of extrasolar planetary matter and the fate of planetary systems at the end stages of stellar evolution.


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