Messenger No. 112 (June 2003)

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Telescopes and Instrumentation

2-2 (PDF)
C. Cesarsky
Progress with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA)

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112....2C
Section:
Telescopes and Instrumentation
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Cesarsky, C.
AA(Director General of ESO)
Abstract:
The ALMA project has made remarkable progress over the last several months, as important agreements have been signed, the project structure finalized and prototype antennas moved from construction to testing.

2-2 (PDF)
ESO
Computer simulation of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). Image created by Herbert Zodet.

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112....1.
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
ESO
AA(ESO)
3-6 (PDF)
F. Primas
The science verification of FLAMES

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112....3P
Section:
Telescopes and Instrumentation
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Primas, F.
AA(User Support Group, ESO)
Abstract:
After a new VLT instrument has been commissioned and thoroughly tested1, a series of scientific and technical checkups are scheduled in order to test the front-to-end operations chain before the official start of regular operations. Technically speaking, these are the socalled Dry Runs, part of which are usually devoted to the Science Verification (SV for short) of that specific instrument. A Science Verification programme includes a set of typical scientific observations with the aim of verifying and demonstrating to the community the capabilities of a new instrument in the operational framework of the VLT Paranal Observatory. Though manifold, its goals can be summarised in two main points: from the scientific point of view, by demonstrating the scientific potential of the new instrument, these observations will provide ESO users with first science- grade data, thus fostering an early scientific return. From the technical point of view, by testing the whole operational system (from the preparation of the observations to their execution and analysis), it will provide important feedback to the Instrument Operation Teams (both in Paranal and in Garching), to the Instrument Division, and to the Data Flow groups. More details about the concept(s) behind a Science Verification can be found in the “Science Verification Policy and Procedures” document (available at http://www.eso.org/science/vltsv/).
References:
Hillenbrand, L. A., 1997, AJ, 113, 173
Hui, X., Ford, H. C., Ciardullo, R., Jacoby, G.
H., 1993, ApJS, 88, 423
Pasquini, L. et al., 2002, The Messenger,
110, 1-9
Queloz, D., Allain, S., Mermilliod, J.-C.,
Bouvier, J., Mayor, M., 1998, A&A, 335,
183
Silva, D., 2001, The Messenger, 105, 18-24
Stassun, K. G., Mathieu, R. D., Mazeh, T.,
Vrba, F. J., 1999, AJ, 117, 2941
7-12 (PDF)
R. Arsenault et al.
MACAO-VLTI first light: adaptive optics at the service of interferometry

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112....7A
Section:
Telescopes and Instrumentation
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Arsenault, R.; Alonso, J.; Bonnet, H.; Brynnel, J.; Delabre, B.; Donaldson, R.; Dupuy, C.; Fedrigo, E.; Spyromilio, J.; Erm, T.; Farinato, J.; Hubin, N.; Ivanescu, L.; Kasper, M.; Oberti, S.; Paufique, J.; Rossi, S.; Tordo, S.; Stroebele, S.; Lizon, J.-L.; Gigan, P.; Pouplard, F.; Delplancke, F.; Silber, A.; Quattri, M.; Reiss, R.
AA(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AB(ESO, La Silla, Chile) AC(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AD(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AE(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AF(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AG(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AH(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AI(ESO, Paranal, Chile) AJ(ESO, Paranal, Chile) AK(Astronomical Observatory of Padova, Italy) AL(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AM(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AN(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AO(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AP(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AQ(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AR(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AS(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AT(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AU(Astronomical Observatory of Padova, Italy) AV(LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, France) AW(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AX(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AY(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AZ(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany)
Abstract:
The AO department of ESO has completed the design of an adaptive AO system for the VLT Interferometer. Ordering of components, manufacturing and integration took place in 2001 and 2002. The system is built in four copies, one for each VLT. It is installed at the Coudé room and the Coudé train is used as a 'science path'. Only one of the mirrors (M8, pupil conjugated) is replaced by the corrective optics. The 60 elements system should allow a Strehl ratio of ~0.6 on bright sources. Commissioning activities started in April 2003 and the delivery of the 4th system is planned for late 2004. At the time of this writing the first commissioning of the first MACAO has been completed and results are encouraging. The integration and test phase of the 2nd system is in full swing.
References:
Bonnet, H., et al. 2002, Proc. SPIE 4839:
Adaptive Optical System Technologies II,
“Implementation of MACAO for SINFONI
at the Cassegrain focus of VLT, in NGS
and LGS modes”
Donaldson, R. et al., 2000, Proc. SPIE 4007,
p.82-93, “MACAO and its application for
the VLT interferometer”
Glindemann, A., et al., 2002, Proc. SPIE
4838: Interferometry for Optical
Astronomy II
Moorwood, A.F.M., et al., 2002, Proc. SPIE
Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation,
“CRIRES: a high-resolution infrared
spectrograph for the VLT”
Roddier, F., 1988, “Curvature sensing and
compensation: a new concept in adaptive
optics”, Appl. Opt., 23, 1223-5
Schödel, R., Ott, T., Genzel, R. et al., 2002,
Nature, 419, 694-696
Verinaud, C., Cassaing, F., 2001, A&A, 365,
314
13-18 (PDF)
Ch. Leinert et al.
MIDI combines light from the VLTI: the start of 10 μm interferometry at ESO

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...13L
Section:
Telescopes and Instrumentation
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Leinert, Ch.; Graser, U.; Richichi, A.; Schöller, M.; Waters, L. F. B. M.; Perrin, G.; Jaffe, W.; Lopez, B.; Glazenborg-Kluttig, A.; Przygodda, F.; Morel, S.; Biereichel, P.; Haddad, N.; Housen, N.; Wallander, A.
AA(MPI für Astronomie, Heidelberg, Germany) AB(MPI für Astronomie, Heidelberg, Germany) AC(ESO, Garching, Germany) AD(ESO, Garching, Germany) AE(Astron. Institute Univ. of Amsterdam, Netherlands) AF(Obs. de Paris-Meudon, France) AG(Sterrewacht Leiden, Netherlands) AH(Obs. de la Côte d’Azur, Nice, France) AI(ASTRON, Dwingeloo, Netherlands) AJ(MPI für Astronomie, Heidelberg, Germany) AK(ESO, Garching, Germany) AL(ESO, Garching, Germany) AM(ESO, Garching, Germany) AN(ESO, Garching, Germany) AO(ESO, Garching, Germany)
Abstract:
When at the beginning of November 2002 the MIDI containers were opened up in Paranal and the team members together with ESO personnel started to assemble the instrument in the VLTI interferometric laboratory, nobody could be completely sure that their ambitious goal could actually be achieved: to bring together for the first time two beams of light from distant giant telescopes at the wavelength of 10 microns and obtaining stable, repeatable and accurate interference fringes. Although the instrument had been designed and built with the utmost care and all laboratory tests in Europe indicated that all specifications were met, going to the sky was another matter. The thermal infrared covers the wavelength range around the peak of the natural emission of a black body with a temperature about 300 K. This is close to the ambient temperature of the telescope mirrors and structure, of the two dozens of mirrors (in each arm) needed to bring the light into the tunnel and the interferometric lab, of all the mechanic structures, and of course of the sky. Therefore, at the wavelengths to which MIDI is sensitive, everything glows brightly! There is no distinction between day and night, and even the brightest stars are just tiny speckles of light in an overwhelmingly bright background. For this reason, previous attempts to perform interferometry in the thermal infrared had to find other ways to combine the light (for example, like Bester et al. (1990), in the style of radiointerferometers, thereby however sacrificing sensitivity), or never achieved a real routine operation. Even the ambitious efforts being carried out at the Keck Interferometer, in spite of having started earlier than at ESO, are so far still confronted with difficulties in this special area.
References:
M. Bester, W. C. Danchi, and C. H. Townes,
“Long baseline interferometer for the midinfrared”
SPIE 1237, 40 - 48, 1990.
A. W. Glazenborg-Kluttig, F. Przygodda, H.
Hanenburg, S. Morel, J.-W. Pel,
“Realization of the MIDI cold optics”, SPIE
4838, 1171-1181, 2003
C. Leinert, U. Graser et al., “Ten-micron instrument
MIDI - getting ready for observations
on the VLTI”, SPIE 4838, 893-904,
2003a
Ch. Leinert, U. Graser et al., “MIDI - the 10
μm instrument on the VLTI”, Conf. Proc.,
11th EAS Meeting: “JENAM 2002: The
Unsolved Universe”, Porto, Portugal,
Astrophys. Space Sci. 2003b
S. Ligori, U. Graser, B. Grimm, R. Klein,
“Experiences with the Raethyon Si: As
IBC detector arrays for mid-IR interferometric
observations”, SPIE 4838, 774-
785, 2003
B. Lopez, Ch. Leinert, U. Graser et al., “The
astrophysical potentials of the MIDI VLTI
instrument”, SPIE 4006, 54 - 67, 2000.
B. Lopez, Ph. Mathias, D. M’ekarnia et al.,
“APres-MIDI, APerture Synthesis in the
MID-Infrared with the VLTI”, SPIE 4838,
1011 - 1015, 2003.
F. Przygodda, O. Chesneau, U. Graser, Ch.
Leinert, S. Morel, “Interferometric observations
at mid-infrared wavelengths with
MIDI”, Conf. Proc., 11th EAS Meeting:
“JENAM 2002: The Unsolved Universe”,
Porto, Portugal, Astrophys. Space Sci.
(2003)
18-18 (PDF)
L. Germany
News from La Silla

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...18G
Section:
Telescopes and Instrumentation
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Germany, L.
AA(SciOps)
Abstract:
Danish 1.54m Handover; Final Dishwalk at the SEST

Reports from Observers

19-24 (PDF)
G. Rudnick et al.
Studying high redshift galaxy clusters with the ESO Distant Cluster Survey

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...19R
Section:
Reports from Observers
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Rudnick, G.; White, S.; Aragón-Salamanca, A.; Bender, R.; Best, P.; Bremer, M.; Charlot, S.; Clowe, D.; Dalcanton, J.; Dantel, M.; De Lucia, G.; Desai, V.; Fort, B.; Halliday, C.; Jablonka, P.; Kauffmann, G.; Mellier, Y.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Pello, R.; Poggianti, B.; Poirier, S.; Róttgering, H.; Saglia, R.; Schneider, P.; Simard, L.; Zaritsky, D.
AA(MPA, Garching, Germany) AB(MPA, Garching, Germany) AC(University of Nottingham, UK) AD(Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, Germany & MPE, Munich, Germany) AE(ROE, Edinburgh, UK) AF(University of Bristol, UK) AG(MPA, Garching, Germany & IAP, Paris, France) AH(IAEF, University of Bonn, Germany) AI(University of Washington, Seattle, USA) AJ(OPM, Paris, France) AK(MPA, Garching, Germany) AL(University of Washington, Seattle, USA) AM(IAP, Paris, France) AN(Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Padova, Italy) AO(OPM, Paris, France) AP(MPA, Garching, Germany) AQ(IAP, Paris, France) AR(MPE, Munich, Germany) AS(OMP, Toulouse, France) AT(Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Padova, Italy) AU(OPM, Paris, France) AV(Leiden Observatory, The Netherlands) AW(Ludwig-Maximilian University, Munich, Germany) AX(IAEF, University of Bonn, Germany) AY(HIA, Victoria, Canada) AZ(Steward Observatory, Tucson, USA)
Abstract:
Galaxy clusters are the most massive quasi-equilibrium objects in the Universe and are the meeting places of the cosmos. Their deep potential wells are dominated by unseen dark matter, but contain a cosmologically representative baryon fraction in the form of galaxies and intergalactic gas. These are trapped in a virialized state, with the gas heated to tens of millions of degrees and the galaxies moving with rms velocities of ~1000 km/s.
References:
Butcher, H. & Oemler, A. 1978, ApJ, 219, 18
De Propris et al. 2002, submitted to MNRAS,
astro-ph/0212562
Dressler, A. 1980, ApJ, 236, 351
Dressler, A. &Gunn, J. E. 1983, ApJ, 270, 7
Dubinski, J. 1998, ApJ, 502, 141
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Kauffmann, G. 2001, MNRAS, 328, 726
van Dokkum, P. G. & Stanford, S. A. 2003,
ApJ, 585, 78
White, S. D. M. 1976, MNRAS, 174, 19
25-30 (PDF)
R. Napiwotzki et al.
SPY - the ESO Supernovae type Ia Progenitor survey

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...25N
Section:
Reports from Observers
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Napiwotzki, R.; Christlieb, N.; Drechsel, H.; Hagen, H.-J.; Heber, U.; Homeier, D.; Karl, C.; Koester, D.; Leibundgut, B.; Marsh, T. R.; Moehler, S.; Nelemans, G.; Pauli, E.-M.; Reimers, D.; Renzini, A.; Yungelson, L.
AA(Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg, Germany) AB(Hamburger Sternwarte, Hamburg, Germany) AC(Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg, Germany) AD(Hamburger Sternwarte, Hamburg, Germany) AE(Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg, Germany) AF(Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Georgia, USA) AG(Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg, Germany) AH(Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universität Kiel, Germany) AI(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AJ(Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Southampton, UK) AK(Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universität Kiel, Germany) AL(Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, UK) AM(Dr. Remeis-Sternwarte, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Bamberg, Germany) AN(Hamburger Sternwarte, Hamburg, Germany) AO(European Southern Observatory, Garching, Germany) AP(Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia)
Abstract:
Supernovae (SNe) mark the violent termination of a star’s life in an explosion. They are classified according to their light curve as type I or II, with the type I SNe producing very similar light curves, while the SNe type II are more diverse. Spectroscopic observations reveal the presence of hydrogen in SNe type II, while no hydrogen lines are detectable in SNe type I. According to their spectral appearance the type I class can be further subdivided into Ia, Ib, and Ic.
References:
Blöcker, T., Herwig, F., Driebe, T., Bramkamp,
H., Schönberner D.1997, in: White dwarfs,
eds. J. Isern, M. Hernanz, E. Garcia-
Berro, Kluwer, Dordrecht, p.57
Iben, I. Jr., Tutukov, A. V., Yungelson, L. R.,
1997, ApJ, 475, 291
Koester, D., Napiwotzki, R., Christlieb, N., et
al., 2001, A&A, 378, 556
Livio, M., 2000, in: “Type Ia Supernovae:
Theory and Cosmology”, Cambridge Univ.
Press, p. 33
Marsh, T. R., 2000, NewAR, 44, 119
McCook, G. P., Sion, E. M., 1999, ApJS, 121, 1
Napiwotzki, R., Christlieb, N., Drechsel, H.,
et al. 2001, AN, 322, 201
Napiwotzki, R., Koester, K., Nelemans, G., et
al., 2002, A&A, 386, 957
Nelemans, G., Yungelson, L. R., Portegies
Zwart, S. F., Verbunt, F., 2001, A&A, 365, 491
Pauli, E.-M., Napiwotzki, R., Altmann, M. et
al., 2003, A&A, 400, 877
31-36 (PDF)
R. G. Gratton et al.
Abundances in globular cluster dwarfs

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...31G
Section:
Reports from Observers
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Gratton, R. G.; Bonifacio, P.; Bragaglia, A.; Carretta, E.; Castellani, V.; Centurion, M.; Chieffi, A.; Claudi, R.; Clementini, G.; D'Antona, F.; Desidera, S.; François, P.; Grundahl, F.; Lucatello, S.; Molaro, P.; Pasquini, L.; Sneden, C.; Spite, F.; Straniero, O.; Zoccali, M.
AA(Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, INAF, Italy) AB(Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, INAF, Italy) AC(Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, INAF, Italy) AD(Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, INAF, Italy) AE(Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Italy) AF(Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, INAF, Italy) AG(Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale, CNR, Italy) AH(Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, INAF, Italy) AI(Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, INAF, Italy) AJ(Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, INAF, Italy) AK(Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, INAF, Italy & Dipartimento di Astronomia, Università di Padova, Italy) AL(European Southern Observatory) AM(Department of Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Denmark) AN(Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, INAF, Italy & Dipartimento di Astronomia, Università di Padova, Italy) AO(Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, INAF, Italy) AP(European Southern Observatory) AQ(The University of Texas at Austin, USA) AR(Observatoire de Meudon, France) AS(Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, INAF, Italy) AT(European Southern Observatory)
Abstract:
Globular Clusters are huge, very compact aggregates of hundreds of thousands of stars (see Figure 1). There are about 150 such systems in our Galaxy, the closest being about 10,000 light years from us; some of them are visible with the naked eye (ω Centauri, 47 Tucanae), and many others are spectacular objects visible with small telescopes. Globular Clusters play an important role in modern astrophysics mainly because they are the oldest objects in our Galaxy and in the whole Universe that we can accurately date. Provided that their distances are known, ages of Globular Clusters can in fact be determined quite precisely from the luminosity of the turn-off stars, that is the stars that are exhausting Hydrogen at their centre. The oldest Globular Clusters are so old that they formed when the Universe was very young, and very different from what it appears now. Accurately dating them is then basic to constraining the early epochs of formation of our own Galaxy, and even the age of the Universe. This last is important for cosmology: combined with estimates of the Hubble constant, it may tell us about the presence and nature of the mysterious dark energy, whose presence is suggested by the apparent decline of the luminosity of type Ia supernovae at high redshifts (Perlmutter et al. 1999), and by the characteristics of the X-ray emission of galaxy clusters (see the review by Rosati et al. 2002).
References:
Bonifacio P. et al. 2002, A&A, 390, 91
Clementini, G., Gratton, R.G., Bragaglia, A.,
Carretta, E., Di Fabrizio, L., & Maio, M.
2003, AJ, 125, 1309
Freedman, W.L. et al. 2001, ApJ, 553, 47
Gratton, R.G., Carretta, E., Matteucci, F. &
Sneden, C. 1996, in Formation of the
Galactic Halo… Inside and Out, H.
Morrison & A. Sarajedini eds., ASP Conf
Ser. 92, 307
Gratton, R.G., Sneden, C., Carretta, E., &
Bragaglia, A. 2000 A&A, 354, 169
Gratton, R.G. et al. 2001, A&A, 369, 87
Kraft, R.P. 1994, PASP, 106, 553
Perlmutter et al. 1999, ApJ, 517, 565
Richard, O., Michaud, G., Richer, J.,
Turcotte, S., Turck-Chieze, S., &
VandenBerg, D.A. 2002, ApJ, 568, 979
Rosati, P., Borgani, S., & Norman, C. 2002,
ARA&A, 40, 539
Rosenberg, A., Saviane, I., Piotto, G., &
Aparicio, A. 1999, AJ, 118, 2306
Spergel, D.N. et al. 2003, submitted to ApJ
(astro-ph/030229)
Spite M. & Spite F., 1982 Nature, 297, 483
Straniero, O., Chieffi, A., & Limongi, M. 1997,
ApJ, 490, 425
37-39 (PDF)
M. Arnaboldi et al.
Intracluster planetary nebulae in the Virgo cluster: tracers of diffuse light

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...37A
Section:
Reports from Observers
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Arnaboldi, M.; Gerhard, O.; Freeman, K. C.
AA(I. N. A. F., Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Turin, Italy & I. N. A. F., Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Naples, Italy) AB(Astronomisches Institut, Universitat Basel, Binningen, Switzerland) AC(RSAA, Mt Stromlo Observatory, ACT, Australia)
Abstract:
The results obtained so far from IC PNe samples have shown that I) the fraction of the diffuse light in the Virgo cluster amounts to 10%-40%; II) the intracluster stars of Virgo are not centrally condensed and not uniformly distributed and III) the front edge of the Virgo cluster is about 20% closer to us than M87. A high-resolution collisionless N-body simulation of a Virgo-like cluster at z = 0 predicts strong substructure in phase space, so our next goal will be to look for substructure in the radial velocity distribution of ICPN candidates in Virgo. The VLT instruments, FLAMES and VIMOS, will be most important in giving us the radial velocity distribution of the stars in the diffuse component, identifying individual streams, and poviding us with samples of the phase space for the diffuse component at different cluster radii. These observational results will be compared with N-body high resolution cosmological simulations and in this way we should be able to determine how old dynamically the diffuse light is.
References:
Arnaboldi, M., et al. 2002, AJ, 123, 760
Arnaboldi, M., et al. 2003, AJ, 125, 514
Bingelli, B., Tammann, G. A., Sandage, A.
1987, AJ, 94, 251
Castro-Rodriguez, N. et al. 2003, A&A, in
press (astro-ph/0304057)
Ferguson, H., Tanvir, N., von Hippel, T. 1998,
Nature, 391, 461
Feldmeier, J. J., Ciardullo, R., Jacoby, G. H.
1998, ApJ, 503, 109
Gerhard, O. et al., 2002, ApJ, 580, L121
Kudritzki, R.-P., et al. 2000, ApJ, 536, 19
Napolitano, N. R., et al. 2003, ApJ, in press
(astro-ph/0305216)
Okamura, S. et al. 2002, PASJ, 54, 883
40-43 (PDF)
F. Barrientos et al.
The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...40B
Section:
Reports from Observers
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Barrientos, F.; Gladders, M.; Yee, H.; Ellingson, E.; Hall, P.; Infante, L.
AA(P. Universidad Católica de Chile) AB(Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington) AC(University of Toronto) AD(University of Colorado) AE(P. Universidad Católica de Chile & Princeton University) AF(P. Universidad Católica de Chile)
Abstract:
The Red-Sequence Cluster Survey is an ambitious project designed to identify a large sample of galaxy clusters over a wide range of redshifts (distances). The resulting sample of galaxy clusters will yield answers about the way in which structures formed and grew in the Universe, and will facilitate a number of other projects. The survey is the largest area survey ever conducted on 4-m class telescopes, and as such will yield important new insights on hitherto poorly measured or unknown phenomena. Despite the large area of the survey (90 square degrees of sky - roughly 500 times the apparent area of the full Moon) a very efficient observing strategy allowed this unprecedented area to be covered in only 25 nights of observing time. Two telescopes were used to complete the project (the Canada-France-Hawaii 3.6 m telescope for the northern hemisphere, and the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory 4 m telescope for the southern hemisphere). The survey began in mid-1999, and observations were finished by late 2001. We are currently using the powerful ESO VLT telescopes for following up some of the highest redshift clusters in the sample.
References:
Gladders, M. D., & Yee, H. K. C. 2000, AJ,
120, 2148
Gladders, M. D., Yee, H. K. C., & Ellingson
E. 2002, AJ, 123, 1
Gladders, M. D., Hoekstra, H., Yee, H. K. C.,
Hall, P. H., & Barrientos, L. F. 2003, ApJ,
in press
Franx, M., Illingworth, G. D., Kelson, D. D.,
van Dokkum, P. G., & Tran, K.-V. 1997,
ApJ, 486, L75
43-46 (PDF)
M. Rejkuba et al.
Long period variables in the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5128: the Mira P-L relation at 4 Mpc

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...43R
Section:
Reports from Observers
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Rejkuba, M.; Minniti, D.; Silva, D. R.; Bedding, T. R.
AA(ESO, Garching, Germany & Department of Astronomy, P. Universidad Católica, Chile) AB(Department of Astronomy, P. Universidad Católica, Chile) AC(ESO, Garching, Germany) AD(School of Physics, University of Sydney, Australia)
Abstract:
ISAAC multi-epoch K-band photometry of two fields in the halo of NGC 5128 was used to detect variable stars. We derived periods for most of these variables via Fourier analysis of the K-band light curves and sine-wave fitting. Their magnitudes indicate that they are in the AGB phase and their periods and amplitudes are consistent with being LPVs. The long-period (400≥P≥100 d) large-amplitude (0.5<ΔK<1.5 mag) Mira variables were used to determine the distance of NGC 5128 from a P-L relation. Adopting a LMC distance modulus of 18.50, we derive the distance modulus of 28.1±0.3, corresponding to D = 4.2±0.6 Mpc. In closing, we would like to note that such programs that require numerous (>10) and relatively short (~1.5 h per Field) observations benefit greatly from the availability of service mode observations. All the images were taken in excellent seeing conditions, ranging from 0'.35-0'.65, enabling us to detect variable stars in a giant elliptical galaxy for the first time and construct the first Mira period-luminosity diagram outside the Local Group. The catalogue with light curve parameters and near-IR photometry of all the variable stars is available through Astronomy & Astrophysics (Rejkuba et al. 2003).
References:
Alves, D.R., Rejkuba, M., Minniti, D., Cook,
K.H., 2002, ApJ, 573, L51
Cioni, M.-R.L., et al., 2003, A&A, in press,
astro-ph/0304143
Feast M.W., Glass, I.S., Whitelock, P.A.,
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47-50 (PDF)
H. Dejonghe et al.
The dynamics of dwarf elliptical galaxies

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...47D
Section:
Reports from Observers
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Dejonghe, H.; de Rijcke, S.; Zeilinger, W. W.; Hau, G. K. T.
AA(Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Ghent University, Belgium) AB(Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Ghent University, Belgium) AC(Institut für Astronomie, University of Vienna, Austria) AD(ESO, Santiago, Chile)
Abstract:
In the course of this Large Program, we have assembled kinematics of unprecedented high quality of a sample of 15 dEs. All data have been reduced and analysed, and the last few objects are being modelled. Thanks to the high spatial and spectral resolution of our observations, we have uncovered the existence of dEs with complex behavior and internal structures (such as embedded stellar discs) that are hard to fit into a simple scenario in which dEs form through the collpase of primordial density fluctuations, like the wind model. Clearly, dEs are anything but small 'island universes' that evolve in splendid isolation: their evolution appears determined, at least in part, by their environment. Thus, the harassment scenario offers an attractive explanation for many observed features that are hard to explain with the wind model.
References:
De Rijcke S., Dejonghe H., Zeilinger W. W.,
Hau G. K. T., 2001, ApJL, 559, L21-L24
De Rijcke S., Zeilinger W. W., Dejonghe H.,
Hau G. K. T., 2003, MNRAS, 339, 225-234
De Rijcke S., Dejonghe H., Zeilinger W. W.,
Hau G. K. T., 2003, A&A, 400, 119-125
Ferguson H. C., Binggeli B., A&ARv, 6, 67-
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Moore B., Katz N, Lake G., Dressler A.,
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Mori M., Yoshii Y., Tsujimoto T., Nomoto K.,
ApJL, 478, L21-L24
Simien F., Prugniel P., A&A, 384, 371-382

Other Astronomical News

51-52 (PDF)
U. Grothkopf
From books to bytes: changes in the ESO libraries over the past decade

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...51G
Section:
Other Astronomical News
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Grothkopf, U.
AA(ESO Library Garching, esolib@eso.org)
Abstract:
Ten years in the lifetime of an astronomy library may not be much, but the past decade brought many changes, and it may be worthwhile to pause for a moment and look back. Ten years ago, we spent most of our time doing paper work, dealing with incoming invoices and processing new books. Our tasks centred on the publications physically located in the libraries. Today, the physical library sites have decreased in importance, and the virtual library is about to take their place. The Internet has become the essential tool to retrieve information and provide rapid service to our users. Instead of making publications available in the library, it has become more important to provide access through the library so that astronomers can reach them conveniently from their desktops.
53-55 (PDF)
O. Hainaut
International Workshop on First Decadal Review of the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt: Toward new Frontiers

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...53H
Section:
Other Astronomical News
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Hainaut, O.
AA(ESO/Chile)
Abstract:
On March 11 to 14, 2003, an international conference on the Minor Bodies in the Outer Solar System was held in Antofagasta, Chile. The conference, which was organized by ESO and Universidad Catolica del Norte (UCN) of Antofagasta, gathered about 70 participants from 20 countries. Originally, it was supposed to take place on the UCN campus. However, a student strike forced us to relocate at the last minute to the Carrera Club Hotel. Thanks to the efforts of A. Lagarini, the conference secretary (and ESO/Chile Science secretary) and to the Hotel staff, this did not cause any disruption. The traditional group photo (opposite) was shot in front of the Geological Museum of UCN. This short summary highlights some of the results presented at this conference; the proceedings, which are currently being edited, will be published as a special issue of “Earth, Moon and Planets.”
55-56 (PDF)
ESO
Fellows at ESO

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...55.
Section:
Other Astronomical News
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
ESO
AA(ESO)
Abstract:
Stefano Ettori; Lisa Germany; Linda Schmidtobreick; Manuela Zoccali
56-56 (PDF)
R. West
High honour to Ray Wilson [Order of the French Legion of Honour]

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...56W
Section:
Other Astronomical News
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
West, R.
AA(ESO)
Abstract:
On May 7, 2003, the planet Mercury passed in front of the Sun. This transit, that occurs approximately once every 7 years, was visible from Europe, Africa and Asia and lasted more than five hours. European observers were particularly at their advantage to follow the event as the Sun was relatively high in the sky during the entire transit. And, luckily, the weather did cooperate over most of Europe.

Announcements

57-57 (PDF)
ESO
ESO Fellowship Programme 2003/2004

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...57.
Section:
Announcements
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
ESO
AA(ESO)
Abstract:
The European Southern Observatory awards several postdoctoral fellowships to provide young scientists opportunities and facilities to enhance their research programmes. Its goal is to bring them into close contact with the instruments, activities, and people at one of the world's foremost observatories. For more information about ESO's astronomical research activities please consult http://www.eso.org/science/

Other Astronomical News

57-57 (PDF)
H. Boffin, R. West
The May 7 Mercury Transit

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...57B
Section:
Other Astronomical News
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Boffin, H.; West, R.
AA(ESO) AB(ESO)
Abstract:
On May 7, 2003, the planet Mercury passed in front of the Sun. This transit, that occurs approximately once every 7 years, was visible from Europe, Africa and Asia and lasted more than five hours. European observers were particularly at their advantage to follow the event as the Sun was relatively high in the sky during the entire transit. And, luckily, the weather did cooperate over most of Europe.

Announcements

58-58 (PDF)
R. West
Kurt Kjär retires from ESO

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...58W
Section:
Announcements
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
West, R.
AA(ESO)
Abstract:
After a long and dedicated service to ESO, Kurt Kjär is retiring from the post of Technical Editor which he has held during an unprecedented period of almost 30 years.
58-58 (PDF)
ESO
Call for Proposals for a Third Generation Instrument for the NTT

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...58.
Section:
Announcements
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
ESO
AA(ESO)
Abstract:
The scientific mission of the La Silla Observatory is periodically reviewed (typically every 3 years) by special ad-hoc Committees, appointed by the ESO Director General and composed of members of the User’s Committee (UC), the Scientific Technical Committee (STC), and ESO staff. The reports of these Committees have been presented to STC and Council and used in planning the long range strategy of ESO. The three successive La Silla Committee reports (LS2000, LS2000+, and LS2006+) have been widely distributed in the community, and one of them (LS2000+) is available on-line through the ESO web site (www.eso.org).
59-59 (PDF)
ESO
Personnel Movements

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112Q..59.
Section:
Announcements
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
ESO
AA(ESO)
59-59 (PDF)
ESO
Head of the Instrumentation Division - Career Path: VII

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...59.
Section:
Announcements
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
ESO
AA(ESO)
Abstract:
Assignment: The Head of the Instrumentation Division directs all ESO-activities pertaining to optical and infrared astronomical instrumentation and reports directly to the Director General. As a member of the ESO Management, the Head of Divison contributes directly to the development of the overall policy, strategic planning and maintains professional contacts at highest level outside the Organisation. The Instrumentation Division consists of about 30 astronomers, physicists and engineers, who work in groups or teams developing infrared and optical instruments and detectors. They also receive extensive support from the ESO Technical Division e.g. in the areas of optical design, electronics hardware and software. The main tasks of the Division are:

60-60 (PDF)
ESO
Contents

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...60.
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
ESO
AA(ESO)
60-60 (PDF)
S. Wagner, B. Leibundgut
ESO Workshop on Large Programmes and Surveys

ADS BibCode:
2003Msngr.112...60W
Section:
Announcements
Author(s)/Affiliation(s):
Wagner, S.; Leibundgut, B.
AA(OPC) AB(ESO)
Abstract:
On 19 to 21 May, 2003, the scientific impact of Large Programmes was assessed at a workshop in Garching. Several members of the OPC and STC actively participated in the workshop.